Search result: Catalogue data in Spring Semester 2021

Earth Sciences Master Information
Major in Geology
Compulsory Module in Analytical Methods in Earth Sciences
Students need to register for 6 credits in part A, and 6 credits in part B.
Part A: Microscopy Courses
Courses for this Module take place in autumn semester.
Part B: Methods
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
651-4038-00LMicrostructures and Rock Rheology
Does not take place this semester.
W3 credits2GW. Behr
Abstract
Objective
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequisite includes Structural Geology. Petrology or Petrography course is strongly recommended.
Restricted Choice Modules Geology
A minimum of two restricted choice modules must be completed for the major Geology.
Biogeochemistry
Biogeochemistry: Compulsory Courses
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
651-4044-04LMicropalaeontology and Molecular PalaeontologyW+3 credits2GH. Stoll, C. De Jonge, T. I. Eglinton, I. Hernández Almeida
AbstractThe course aims to provide an introduction to the key micropaleontological and molecular fossils from marine and terrestrial niches, and the use of these fossils for reconstructing environmental and evolutionary changes.
ObjectiveThe course aims to provide an introduction to the key micropaleontological and molecular fossils from marine and terrestrial niches, and the use of these fossils for reconstructing environmental and evolutionary changes.

The course will include laboratory exercises with microscopy training: identification of plantonic foraminifera and the application of transfer functions, identification of calcareous nannoliths and estimation of water column structure and productivity with n-ratio, identification of major calcareous nannofossils for Mesozoic-cenozoic biostratigraphy, Quaternary radiolarian assemblages and estimation of diversity indices.
The course will include laboratory exercises on molecular markers include study of chlorin extracts, alkenone and TEX86 distributions and temperature reconstruction, and terrestrial leaf wax characterization, using GC-FID, LC-MS, and spectrophotometry.
ContentMicropaleontology and Molecular paleontology
1. Introduction to the domains of life and molecular and mineral fossils. Genomic classifications of domains of life. Biosynthesis and molecular fossils and preservation/degradation. Biomineralization and mineral fossils and preservation/dissolution. Review of stable isotopes in biosynthesis.
2. The planktic niche – primary producers. Resources and challenges of primary production in the marine photic zone – light supply, nutrient supply, water column structure and niche partitioning. Ecological strategies and specialization, bloom succession, diversity and size gradients in the modern ocean. Introduction to principal mineralizing phytoplankton – diatoms, coccolithophores, dynoflagellates, as well as cyanobacteria. Molecular markers including alkenones, long-chain diols and sterols, IP25, pigments, diatom UV-absorbing compounds. Application of fossils and markers as environmental proxies. Long term evolutionary evidence for originations, radiations, and extinctions in microfossils and biomarkers; evolution of size trends in phytoplankton over Cenozoic, geochemical evidence for evolution of carbon concentrating mechanisms. Introduction to nannofossil biostratigraphy.
3. The planktic niche – heterotrophy from bacteria to zooplankton. Resources and challenges of planktic heterotrophy – food supply, oxygen availability, seasonal cycles, seasonal and vertical niche partitioning. Introduction to principal mineralizing zooplankton planktic foraminifera and radiolaria: ecological strategies and specialization, succession, diversity and size gradients in the modern ocean. Morphometry and adaptations for symbiont hosting. Molecular records such as isorenieratene and Crenoarcheota GDGT; the debate of TEX86 temperature production. Long term evolutionary evidence for originations, radiations, and extinctions in microfossils; evolution of size and form, basic biostratigraphy. Molecular evidence of evolution including diversification of sterol/sterine assemblages.
4. The benthic niche – continental margins. Resources and challenges of benthic heterotrophy – food supply, oxygen, turbulence and substrate. Principal mineralizing benthic organisms – benthic foraminifera and ostracods. Benthic habitat gradients (infaunal and epifaunal; shallow to deep margin. Microbial redox ladder in sediments. Molecular markers of methanogenesis and methanotrophy, Anamox markers, pristine/phytane redox indicator. Applications of benthic communities for sea level reconstructions. Major originations and extinctions.
5. The benthic niche in the abyssal ocean. Resources and challenges of deep benthic heterotrophy. Benthic foraminifera, major extinctions and turnover events. Relationship to deep oxygen level and productivity.
6. Terrestrial dry niches -soils and trees. Resources and challenges - impacts of temperature, humidity, CO2 and soil moisture on terrestrial vegetation and microbial reaction and turnover. Introduction to pollen and molecular markers for soil pH, humidity, leaf wax C3-C4 community composition and hydrology. Long term evolution of C4 pathway, markers for angiosperm and gymnosperm evolution.
7. Terrestrial aquatic environments – resources and challenges. Lake systems, seasonal mixing regimes, eutrophication, closed/open systems. Introduction to lacustrine diatoms, chironomids, testate amoeba. Molecular markers in lake/box environments including paleogenomics of communities.
Lecture notesA lab and lecture manual will be distributed at the start of the course and additional material will be available in the course Moodle
LiteratureKey references from primary literature will be provided as pdf on the course moodle.
Prerequisites / NoticeTiming: The course starts on February 19 and ends on May 28. Prerequisites: Recall and remember what you learned in introductory chemistry and biology
651-4004-00LThe Global Carbon Cycle - ReducedW+3 credits2GT. I. Eglinton, L. Bröder, R. G. Hilton
AbstractThe carbon cycle connects different reservoirs of C, including life on Earth, atmospheric CO2, and economically important geological reserves of C. Much of this C is in reduced (organic) form, and is composed of complex chemical structures that reflect diverse biological activity, processes and transformations.
ObjectiveA wealth of information is held within the complex organic molecules, both in the context of the contemporary carbon cycle and its links to is other biogeochemical cycles, as well as in relation to Earth's history, the evolution of life and climate on this planet.

In this course we will learn about the role of reduced forms of carbon in the global cycle, how these forms of carbon are produced, move around the planet, and become sequestered in the geological record, and how they can be used to infer biological activity and conditions on this planet in the geologic past. The course encompasses a range of spatial and temporal scales, from molecular to global, and from the contemporary environment to earliest life.
Prerequisites / NoticeThis course is good preparation for the combined Field-Lab Course: "651-4044-02 P Geomicrobiology and Biogeochemistry Field Course" and "651-4044-01 P Geomicrobiology and Biogeochemistry Lab Practical"
Biogeochemistry: Courses of Choice
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
651-4044-02LGeomicrobiology and Biogeochemistry Field Course Information
Lectures from "Micropalaeontology and Molecular Palaeontology" and "The Global Carbon Cycle - Reduced" are recommended but not mandatory for participation in the field course.

Priority is given to D-ERDW students. If space is available UZH Geography and Earth System Sciences students may attend this field course at full cost.

No registration through myStudies. The registration for excursions and field courses goes through http://exkursionen.erdw.ethz.ch only.
W2 credits4PT. I. Eglinton, A. Gilli
AbstractGeochemistry: C-sequestration in glacial flood plains, soil formation on different bedrocks, nutrient scavenging in lakes
Geo-Ecology: Geochemical, hydrologic, atmospheric interactions
Geo-Microbiology: Pioneering organisms in "new" habitats in glacial retreat areas, their role in carbon cycling. Microbes dissolving/forming minerals
Lifestyles: Physiological adaptation to extreme conditions
ObjectiveIllustrating basic geological, chemical and geo-biological topics under natural conditions and relating them to past, present and future global environmental conditions in high mountain habitats.
Each course participant focuses on a scientific question related to one of the course topics, searches for details in the literature and presents a short summary of his / her course research on the last day of the course.

Didactic Approach: Preparation lectures, investigation of field sites, sampling and sample preservation and follow-up analyses for the lab module (651-4044-01L), studying papers, exercises on concept formulation, ecosystem modeling, presentation of field results.
The preparation for the fieldwork is designed as a partial distance-learning course via the internet. Field Guides along with other course material can be viewed before the field course. Detailed introduction to the topics takes place during the course week. Students will need to complete a variety of assignments and participate at discussion forums on OLAT before and during the field course.
ContentThe field course (651-4044-02L) will take place from September 4 to September 9, 2021, in the Biogeoscience Arena Silvretta. It can be followed by a semester project in the laboratory (independent sign-up under 651-4044-01L).
Which sites will be visited in the Biogeoscience Arena Silvretta depends on the weather, accessibility in case of early snow, and the time. Selection of topics depending on course focus:
1. Biogeochemical processes in rock weathering and the formation of minerals: Gonzen, former iron mine; Alvaneu, sulfur springs. Chemical and microbially mediated transformation of carbonates and gypsum: Albula valley region.
2. Geomicrobiology and hydrogeochemistry in thermal spring (Tamina gorge, Pfäffers) and cold water mineral springs of the Lower Engadin Window: Highly mineralized spring water emerging from low-grade metamorphic rocks (Bündner shist) by ion exchange processes and release of rock interstitial fluids.
3. Geochemical nutrient sequestration in high mountain lakes and in snow and ice: Joeri lake area (Silvretta gneiss).
4. Coupled processes in biogeochemical iron, manganese, and phosphorus cycling: Jöri lake XIII.
5. Primary processes in soil and peat formation (inorganic to organic transition, carbon sequestration) and microbial colonization: Glacial retreat flood plains, early vegetation on deltas, and moraine soils.
6. Lifestyles under extreme conditions: Microorganisms and small invertebrates in ice (Cryoconite holes, Silvretta glacier), snow, and highly mineralized spring water.
7. Formation and weathering of serpentinite (Totalp), effects on soil formation, and on vegetation.
8. Economic aspects of geo-hydrology: mineral water market, wellness tourism, and geo-medical aspects.
(not all sites listed will be visited every year. The topics might vary depending on the course focus and the participants.)
Lecture notesThe new field guides and details about the course logistics will become available on OLAT in June via Details under https://lms.uzh.ch/url/RepositoryEntry/16318464010?guest=true&lang=de
(The course site will be renewed as soon as all details are available). Participants who are enrolled for this course in the excursion sign-up tool will receive further instructions during the spring semester.
LiteratureLecture slides and literature references are available on the corresponding OLAT site: Details under https://lms.uzh.ch/url/RepositoryEntry/16318464010?guest=true&lang=de
Prerequisites / NoticeSites visited and course contents can vary from year to year depending on interest, accessibility and weather conditions.
Field-work can last up to 8 hours daily and will take place at altitudes up to 3000m. This requires endurance and a certain physical fitness. Participants need to be prepared.
Target Groups: Field course and semester project work for the upper level Bachelor curriculum and for Master students.

This field course is coupled to a semester project work "651-4044-01 P Geomicrobiology and Biogeochemistry Lab Practical", when samples collected during the field work will be analyzed. Students who sign up for both, the field and the lab component, have priority. It is possible, however, to participate at the field section only.
The lecture course "651-4004-00L Organic Geochemistry and the Global Carbon Cycle" is a good preparations for the combined Field-Lab Course.

Students registering for the course confirm having read and accepted the terms and conditions for excursions and field courses of D-ERDW Link
651-4056-00LLimnogeologyW3 credits2GN. Dubois, A. Gilli, K. Kremer
AbstractThis course links lakes, their subsurface and their environment. It will be discussed how lake sediments record past environmental changes (e.g. climate, human impact, natural hazards) and how lake sediments can be used to reconstruct these changes. Emphasis is also given on the modern limnologic processes essential in interpreting the fossil record. Field and laboratory work is foreseen.
ObjectiveStudents are able to
- explain and discuss the role of lake sediments as archives of environmental change.
- plan an own limnogeologic campaign, i.e. finding, recovering, analyzing and interpreting the sedimentary lake archive to solve a particular scientific question.
- examine the complexity of a lake system with all its connection to the environment.
- relate subaerial processes with subaquatic processes.
- identify processes around and in lakes causing natural hazards.
ContentContent of the course:
Introduction - Lakes, the small oceans
History of Limnogeology.
Limnogeologic campaigns
The water column: Aquatic physics (currents, waves, oscillations, etc.).
Sediments caught in the water: sediment traps
Geophysical survey methods (multibeam bathymetry, seismics)
Large open perialpine lakes.
Laminations in lake sediments: Clastic vs. biochemical varves.
Hydrologically closed lake systems
Chronostratigraphic dating of lake sediments
Lake sediments as proxies for climate change
Lake sediments as recorder of anthropogenic impact

The class includes 2 lectures as field work on Lake Zurich.
Introduction to themes of Lake Zurich field work.
Limnogeological methods on the lake and in the laboratory: various sampling and surveying techniques (water analysis, seismic surveying, sediment coring, laboratory analyses).
Seismic-to-core correlation and interpretation
Lecture notesWill be distributed in each class unit.
LiteratureWill be distributed in each class unit.
Prerequisites / NoticeCredit points and grade will be given based on a individually written report about the project and a group presentation.
651-4226-00LGeochemical and Isotopic Tracers of the Earth System Restricted registration - show details W+3 credits2VD. Vance
AbstractThe unit will investigate the geochemical approaches used to understand the dynamics of the surface Earth, with an emphasis on geochemical archives preserved in ocean sediments. The class will be organised into four themes, each treating a different aspect of surface Earth chemistry and how it is recorded in archives - mainly ocean sediments but also including others ice-cores and loess.
ObjectiveThe unit is designed with the particular aim of providing a firm grounding in the geochemical methods used to observe and trace the Earth System, now and in the past. Students will gain a basic understanding of the relevant geochemical techniques through at least one 1.5 hour lecture for each theme, and will encourage students to think about their application and interpretation from first principles. But the emphasis will be placed on independent learning by the student through their own research, and the presentation of that research to the class. For each theme, we will use particular time periods in Earth history as case studies. All students will investigate one of these tools in depth themselves, including the application of that tool to problems and questions in the history of the surface Earth.
ContentThe themes covered in the class will include:
Tracing the large-scale controls on ocean chemistry through time using analytical tools, mass balance and box models;
How ocean physics, chemistry and biology can explain the record of atmospheric chemistry preserved in Quaternary ice-cores;
Tracking global-scale aspects of the carbon cycle through time, concentrating on processes on the continents, such as chemical weathering, how their record is preserved in the oceans, and using the Cenozoic as a case study;
What secular variation in ocean redox tells us about large-scale biogeochemical cycles, using the Mesozoic as a case study.

Students will be encouraged to become familiar with the range of modern geochemical tools used to investigate key scientific questions within the above themes, such as radiogenic isotopes, stable isotopes, speciation of elements in the oceans and in sediments.
Lecture notesFor lectures on the basic aspects of each theme, slides will be available in advance of the lectures.
LiteratureAbout two thirds of the class will be devoted to student presentations of particular geochemical methods they have researched themselves, with the aid of published papers available online and as guided by the teaching team.
Prerequisites / NoticeThis class builds on ETH Bachelors classes in oceanography, in geochemistry and in earth system science. Those who have not taken similar classes in their Bachelors may need to familiarise themselves with basic concepts in order to take full advantage of this class. Basic reading material will be compiled that those who might need them can consult - but it is the responsibility of the student to do the catching up.
Palaeoclimatology
Palaeoclimatology: Compulsory Courses
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
651-4004-00LThe Global Carbon Cycle - ReducedO3 credits2GT. I. Eglinton, L. Bröder, R. G. Hilton
AbstractThe carbon cycle connects different reservoirs of C, including life on Earth, atmospheric CO2, and economically important geological reserves of C. Much of this C is in reduced (organic) form, and is composed of complex chemical structures that reflect diverse biological activity, processes and transformations.
ObjectiveA wealth of information is held within the complex organic molecules, both in the context of the contemporary carbon cycle and its links to is other biogeochemical cycles, as well as in relation to Earth's history, the evolution of life and climate on this planet.

In this course we will learn about the role of reduced forms of carbon in the global cycle, how these forms of carbon are produced, move around the planet, and become sequestered in the geological record, and how they can be used to infer biological activity and conditions on this planet in the geologic past. The course encompasses a range of spatial and temporal scales, from molecular to global, and from the contemporary environment to earliest life.
Prerequisites / NoticeThis course is good preparation for the combined Field-Lab Course: "651-4044-02 P Geomicrobiology and Biogeochemistry Field Course" and "651-4044-01 P Geomicrobiology and Biogeochemistry Lab Practical"
Palaeoclimatology: Courses of Choice
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
651-4226-00LGeochemical and Isotopic Tracers of the Earth System Restricted registration - show details W+3 credits2VD. Vance
AbstractThe unit will investigate the geochemical approaches used to understand the dynamics of the surface Earth, with an emphasis on geochemical archives preserved in ocean sediments. The class will be organised into four themes, each treating a different aspect of surface Earth chemistry and how it is recorded in archives - mainly ocean sediments but also including others ice-cores and loess.
ObjectiveThe unit is designed with the particular aim of providing a firm grounding in the geochemical methods used to observe and trace the Earth System, now and in the past. Students will gain a basic understanding of the relevant geochemical techniques through at least one 1.5 hour lecture for each theme, and will encourage students to think about their application and interpretation from first principles. But the emphasis will be placed on independent learning by the student through their own research, and the presentation of that research to the class. For each theme, we will use particular time periods in Earth history as case studies. All students will investigate one of these tools in depth themselves, including the application of that tool to problems and questions in the history of the surface Earth.
ContentThe themes covered in the class will include:
Tracing the large-scale controls on ocean chemistry through time using analytical tools, mass balance and box models;
How ocean physics, chemistry and biology can explain the record of atmospheric chemistry preserved in Quaternary ice-cores;
Tracking global-scale aspects of the carbon cycle through time, concentrating on processes on the continents, such as chemical weathering, how their record is preserved in the oceans, and using the Cenozoic as a case study;
What secular variation in ocean redox tells us about large-scale biogeochemical cycles, using the Mesozoic as a case study.

Students will be encouraged to become familiar with the range of modern geochemical tools used to investigate key scientific questions within the above themes, such as radiogenic isotopes, stable isotopes, speciation of elements in the oceans and in sediments.
Lecture notesFor lectures on the basic aspects of each theme, slides will be available in advance of the lectures.
LiteratureAbout two thirds of the class will be devoted to student presentations of particular geochemical methods they have researched themselves, with the aid of published papers available online and as guided by the teaching team.
Prerequisites / NoticeThis class builds on ETH Bachelors classes in oceanography, in geochemistry and in earth system science. Those who have not taken similar classes in their Bachelors may need to familiarise themselves with basic concepts in order to take full advantage of this class. Basic reading material will be compiled that those who might need them can consult - but it is the responsibility of the student to do the catching up.
651-4056-00LLimnogeologyW+3 credits2GN. Dubois, A. Gilli, K. Kremer
AbstractThis course links lakes, their subsurface and their environment. It will be discussed how lake sediments record past environmental changes (e.g. climate, human impact, natural hazards) and how lake sediments can be used to reconstruct these changes. Emphasis is also given on the modern limnologic processes essential in interpreting the fossil record. Field and laboratory work is foreseen.
ObjectiveStudents are able to
- explain and discuss the role of lake sediments as archives of environmental change.
- plan an own limnogeologic campaign, i.e. finding, recovering, analyzing and interpreting the sedimentary lake archive to solve a particular scientific question.
- examine the complexity of a lake system with all its connection to the environment.
- relate subaerial processes with subaquatic processes.
- identify processes around and in lakes causing natural hazards.
ContentContent of the course:
Introduction - Lakes, the small oceans
History of Limnogeology.
Limnogeologic campaigns
The water column: Aquatic physics (currents, waves, oscillations, etc.).
Sediments caught in the water: sediment traps
Geophysical survey methods (multibeam bathymetry, seismics)
Large open perialpine lakes.
Laminations in lake sediments: Clastic vs. biochemical varves.
Hydrologically closed lake systems
Chronostratigraphic dating of lake sediments
Lake sediments as proxies for climate change
Lake sediments as recorder of anthropogenic impact

The class includes 2 lectures as field work on Lake Zurich.
Introduction to themes of Lake Zurich field work.
Limnogeological methods on the lake and in the laboratory: various sampling and surveying techniques (water analysis, seismic surveying, sediment coring, laboratory analyses).
Seismic-to-core correlation and interpretation
Lecture notesWill be distributed in each class unit.
LiteratureWill be distributed in each class unit.
Prerequisites / NoticeCredit points and grade will be given based on a individually written report about the project and a group presentation.
651-4004-00LThe Global Carbon Cycle - ReducedW+3 credits2GT. I. Eglinton, L. Bröder, R. G. Hilton
AbstractThe carbon cycle connects different reservoirs of C, including life on Earth, atmospheric CO2, and economically important geological reserves of C. Much of this C is in reduced (organic) form, and is composed of complex chemical structures that reflect diverse biological activity, processes and transformations.
ObjectiveA wealth of information is held within the complex organic molecules, both in the context of the contemporary carbon cycle and its links to is other biogeochemical cycles, as well as in relation to Earth's history, the evolution of life and climate on this planet.

In this course we will learn about the role of reduced forms of carbon in the global cycle, how these forms of carbon are produced, move around the planet, and become sequestered in the geological record, and how they can be used to infer biological activity and conditions on this planet in the geologic past. The course encompasses a range of spatial and temporal scales, from molecular to global, and from the contemporary environment to earliest life.
Prerequisites / NoticeThis course is good preparation for the combined Field-Lab Course: "651-4044-02 P Geomicrobiology and Biogeochemistry Field Course" and "651-4044-01 P Geomicrobiology and Biogeochemistry Lab Practical"
651-4044-04LMicropalaeontology and Molecular PalaeontologyW3 credits2GH. Stoll, C. De Jonge, T. I. Eglinton, I. Hernández Almeida
AbstractThe course aims to provide an introduction to the key micropaleontological and molecular fossils from marine and terrestrial niches, and the use of these fossils for reconstructing environmental and evolutionary changes.
ObjectiveThe course aims to provide an introduction to the key micropaleontological and molecular fossils from marine and terrestrial niches, and the use of these fossils for reconstructing environmental and evolutionary changes.

The course will include laboratory exercises with microscopy training: identification of plantonic foraminifera and the application of transfer functions, identification of calcareous nannoliths and estimation of water column structure and productivity with n-ratio, identification of major calcareous nannofossils for Mesozoic-cenozoic biostratigraphy, Quaternary radiolarian assemblages and estimation of diversity indices.
The course will include laboratory exercises on molecular markers include study of chlorin extracts, alkenone and TEX86 distributions and temperature reconstruction, and terrestrial leaf wax characterization, using GC-FID, LC-MS, and spectrophotometry.
ContentMicropaleontology and Molecular paleontology
1. Introduction to the domains of life and molecular and mineral fossils. Genomic classifications of domains of life. Biosynthesis and molecular fossils and preservation/degradation. Biomineralization and mineral fossils and preservation/dissolution. Review of stable isotopes in biosynthesis.
2. The planktic niche – primary producers. Resources and challenges of primary production in the marine photic zone – light supply, nutrient supply, water column structure and niche partitioning. Ecological strategies and specialization, bloom succession, diversity and size gradients in the modern ocean. Introduction to principal mineralizing phytoplankton – diatoms, coccolithophores, dynoflagellates, as well as cyanobacteria. Molecular markers including alkenones, long-chain diols and sterols, IP25, pigments, diatom UV-absorbing compounds. Application of fossils and markers as environmental proxies. Long term evolutionary evidence for originations, radiations, and extinctions in microfossils and biomarkers; evolution of size trends in phytoplankton over Cenozoic, geochemical evidence for evolution of carbon concentrating mechanisms. Introduction to nannofossil biostratigraphy.
3. The planktic niche – heterotrophy from bacteria to zooplankton. Resources and challenges of planktic heterotrophy – food supply, oxygen availability, seasonal cycles, seasonal and vertical niche partitioning. Introduction to principal mineralizing zooplankton planktic foraminifera and radiolaria: ecological strategies and specialization, succession, diversity and size gradients in the modern ocean. Morphometry and adaptations for symbiont hosting. Molecular records such as isorenieratene and Crenoarcheota GDGT; the debate of TEX86 temperature production. Long term evolutionary evidence for originations, radiations, and extinctions in microfossils; evolution of size and form, basic biostratigraphy. Molecular evidence of evolution including diversification of sterol/sterine assemblages.
4. The benthic niche – continental margins. Resources and challenges of benthic heterotrophy – food supply, oxygen, turbulence and substrate. Principal mineralizing benthic organisms – benthic foraminifera and ostracods. Benthic habitat gradients (infaunal and epifaunal; shallow to deep margin. Microbial redox ladder in sediments. Molecular markers of methanogenesis and methanotrophy, Anamox markers, pristine/phytane redox indicator. Applications of benthic communities for sea level reconstructions. Major originations and extinctions.
5. The benthic niche in the abyssal ocean. Resources and challenges of deep benthic heterotrophy. Benthic foraminifera, major extinctions and turnover events. Relationship to deep oxygen level and productivity.
6. Terrestrial dry niches -soils and trees. Resources and challenges - impacts of temperature, humidity, CO2 and soil moisture on terrestrial vegetation and microbial reaction and turnover. Introduction to pollen and molecular markers for soil pH, humidity, leaf wax C3-C4 community composition and hydrology. Long term evolution of C4 pathway, markers for angiosperm and gymnosperm evolution.
7. Terrestrial aquatic environments – resources and challenges. Lake systems, seasonal mixing regimes, eutrophication, closed/open systems. Introduction to lacustrine diatoms, chironomids, testate amoeba. Molecular markers in lake/box environments including paleogenomics of communities.
Lecture notesA lab and lecture manual will be distributed at the start of the course and additional material will be available in the course Moodle
LiteratureKey references from primary literature will be provided as pdf on the course moodle.
Prerequisites / NoticeTiming: The course starts on February 19 and ends on May 28. Prerequisites: Recall and remember what you learned in introductory chemistry and biology
Sedimentology
Sedimentology: Compulsory Courses
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
651-4150-00LSedimentary Rocks and Processes Information
Geography and Earth System Sciences students UZH may attend this field course at full costs (no subsidies).

No registration through myStudies. The registration for excursions and field courses goes through http://exkursionen.erdw.ethz.ch only.
O4 credits3PV. Picotti, S. Willett
AbstractStudents will be trained for 10 days in the field analysis of sedimentary rocks. They will learn how to measure sections, they will combine facies analysis with analysis of sedimentary structures in the field. The area of study selected for this course changes from year to year.
ObjectiveThe students will be able to analyse and describe marine sedimentary rocks in the field and they will be able to reconstruct their depositional setting.
ContentThe students will learn how to analyze sedimentary rocks in the field. The field course will include investigations of marine carbonates and siliciclastics in an alpine setting.
LiteratureWill be distributed before the course
Prerequisites / NoticeBSc in Earth Sciences
Some experience in geological field mapping (Geological Field Course 1 and 2 or equivalent)
Sedimentology: Courses of Choice
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
651-4134-00LTectonic Geomorphology Information Restricted registration - show details
Prerequisite for 651-4134-01L Tectonic Geomorphology Field Course

Priority is given to D-ERDW students. If space is available UZH Geography and Earth System Sciences students may attend this field course at full cost.
W3 credits2VE. Deal
AbstractCourse covers the theory and applications of tectonic geomorphology. Topics include the landscape response to an earthquake, use of fluvial terraces and other geomorphic markers to map uplift, methods of dating surfaces and landscapes, topographic evolution over active structures and landscape evolution of active mountain ranges. Methods include field mapping, DEM analysis and computer modeling.
ObjectiveTo learn theoretical and practical aspects of modern tectonic geomorphology. Classroom and computer-based analysis will be combined to provide hands-on experience with geomorphic data, analysis and modeling techniques. We will work through a series of practicals based on real world case studies that will build on the concepts learned in class.
ContentCourse includes a lecture component (in second half-semester) and a series of classroom practicals. Students should also register for the associated fieldtrip component, which will hopefully be able to take place. The fieldtrip will involve collecting field data from active structures in the Northern Apennines. Lecture component will include theoretical background and analysis of real world data.
LiteratureRequired Textbook: Tectonic Geomorphology, Burbank and Anderson, Blackwell.
Prerequisites / NoticeStudents should register for both lecture and field components (blockcourse). If the fieldtrip is able to take place, they will be graded together. Fieldtrip will be held during 1 week of the semester.

Geography and Earth System Sciences students UZH may attend the lecture but will have to pay the full amount for this field course (no subsidies from UZH).
651-4134-01LTectonic Geomorphology Field Course Information Restricted registration - show details
Prerequisite: 651-4134-00L Tectonic Geomorphology (lecture)

Priority is given to D-ERDW students. If space is available UZH Geography and Earth System Sciences students may attend this field course at full cost.
W3 credits6PV. Picotti
AbstractCourse covers the applications of tectonic geomorphology. Topics include the landscape response to an earthquake, use of fluvial terraces and other geomorphic markers to map uplift, topographic evolution over active structures and landscape evolution of active mountain ranges. Methods include field mapping and description of key outcrops.
ObjectiveTo learn practical aspects of modern tectonic geomorphology. The field course will be combined with classroom and computer-based analysis to provide hands-on experience with geomorphic data, analysis and modelling techniques. We will work as a group to address the practical questions regarding evidence for recent deformation of the northern Apennines as an integrated field and modeling study. We will learn to use a variety of geomorphic and tectonic data to map uplift rates and patterns and use this to infer subsurface faulting kinematics.
ContentCourse includes a 9 day fieldtrip (in second half-semester) to be integrated with the lecture component. Students are invited to register for both components. Fieldtrip will involve collecting geologic and geomorphic field data from active structures in the Northern Apennines.
LiteratureRequired Textbook: Tectonic Geomorphology, Burbank and Anderson, Blackwell.
Prerequisites / NoticeAlthough separated from the theory part for practical reasons, students have to register for both lecture and field course. Fieldtrip will be held during 1 week of the semester, typically in early May.

Students registering for the course confirm having read and accepted the terms and conditions for excursions and field courses of D-ERDW Link

Geography and Earth System Sciences students UZH may attend the lecture but will have to pay the full amount for this field course (no subsidies from UZH).
101-0302-00LClays in Geotechnics: Problems and ApplicationsW3 credits2GM. Plötze
AbstractThis course gives a comprehensive introduction in clay mineralogy, properties, characterising and testing methods as well as applied aspects and problems of clays and clay minerals in geotechnics.
ObjectiveUpon successful completion of this course the student is able to:
- Describe clay minerals and their fundamental properties
- Describe/propose methods for characterisation of clays and clay minerals
- Draw conclusion about specific properties of clays with a focus to their potential use, problematics and things to consider in geotechnics and engineering geology.
Content- Introduction to clays and clay minerals (importance and application in geosciences, industry and everyday life)
- Origin of clays (formation of clays and clay minerals, geological origin)
- Clay mineral structure, classification and identification incl. methods for investigation (e.g., XRD)
- Properties of clay materials, characterisation and quantification incl. methods for investigation (e.g., cation exchange, rheology, plasticity, shearing, swelling, permeability, retardation and diffusion)
- Clay Minerals in geotechnics: Problems and applications (e.g. soil mechanics, barriers, slurry walls, tunnelling)
Lecture notesLecture slides and further documents will be provided.
651-4080-00LFluvial SedimentologyW2 credits2GP. Huggenberger
AbstractUnderstanding the relationship between sediment transport, sediment sorting and sedimentary structures in coarse fluvial deposts.
ObjectiveDescription of coarse fluvial sediments, to understand the sedimentary processes of braided river systems, to get familiar with modeling concepts of braided river systems and sediment sorting processes, description and comparison of modern river sediments (systems) and ancient systems, discussion of applied aspects of fluvial sedimentology
Audiance: Students in Geo- or Earth Sciences, Environmental Sciences and Geography
Content- Advanced methods for the description of fluvial sediments of coarse fluvial systems, including geophysical methods
- Facies analysis and interpretation, description of sediment sorting, textures and structures of coarse fluvial systems
- Understanding sediment sorting and sediment transport processes of coarse gravelly rivers (the role of turbulence)
- Recognition of the relation between surface morphology (earth surface) and geological structures to recognize in outcrops or along cliffs
- Influence of preservation potential of sedimentary units in dynamic environments
- Landscape shaping processes
- Applied fluvial sedimentology
- recent developments in investigation methods
Lecture notesHandouts will be provided during semester (Text, Appendix, Figures)
LiteratureBridge, John S., 2003, Rivers and Floodplains; Forms, Processes and Sedimentary RecordCalow,

Best, J. L. and Bristow, C. S., 1993, Braided Rivers, Geological Society Special Publication, No 75.

Clifford, N. J. et al. 1993, Turbulence, Perspectives on Flow and Sediment Transport, Wiley, 360 p.

P. and Petts, G., 1995, The Rivers Handbook: Hydrological and Ecological Principles, Volume I and II

Miall, A. D., 1985, The Geology of Fluvial Deposits, Sedimentary Facies Analysis, Basin Analysis, and Petroleum Geology

Chiang, H. H. 1992, Fluvial Processes in River Engineering
Prerequisites / NoticeStudy of selected papers related to the course
Requirements: Basic courses in Geo- or Earth Sciences

Working Excursions as important topic of the course (according to the ETH Corona protection Measures)

Students registering for the course confirm having read and accepted the terms and conditions for excursions and field courses of D-ERDW Link
651-4902-00LQuaternary Geology and Geomorphology of the Alps Information Restricted registration - show details
Geography and Earth System Sciences students UZH may attend the lecture but will have to pay the full amount for the excursion (no subsidies from UZH).
W3 credits2VS. Ivy Ochs, N. Akçar, U. H. Fischer
AbstractAfter a brief introduction to the scientific principles of glaciology, we survey the present state of knowledge on Pleistocene glacial periods and post-glacial landscape modification in the Alps. Emphasis is on understanding modes of formation of landscape elements attributable to glacial, glaciofluvial, periglacial, fluvial, hillslope, and mass wasting processes.
ObjectiveThrough a combination of lectures, classroom practical exercises, and field mapping of Quaternary landforms, an intuitive understanding of the formation and evolution of the landscape of the Alps and the forelands will be built up.
We focus on development of the following skills: landform recognition on remote imagery and in the field; depositional process identification based on sediment characterization; reconstruction of valley-scale geomorphological evolutionary sequences.
ContentThe following topics will be covered: glacier mass and energy balance; glacier motion; glacier hydrology; glacial erosion; glacial sediment balance; piedmont and valley glacier landsystems; till formation; glaciofluvial sediments; alluvial and debris-flow fan processes; Alpine rock slope failure landform/sediment associations; Alpine Quaternary stratigraphy; long-term uplift and denudation of the Alps.
Lecture notesSlides from the lectures will be made available.
LiteratureLists of key scientific articles will be given for each topic.
Relevant scientific articles will be distributed during the course.
Prerequisites / NoticeStudents registering for the course confirm having read and accepted the terms and conditions for excursions and field courses of D-ERDW Link

Required attendance at lectures and excurisions (several 1-day excursions during the semester and one 3-day field mapping session during the summer).

Geography and Earth System Sciences students UZH may attend this excursion at full costs (no subsidies from UZH).

Grading will be a combination of classroom participation, student presentations, practical exercises, field reports, and field maps from the excursions.
651-4004-00LThe Global Carbon Cycle - ReducedW3 credits2GT. I. Eglinton, L. Bröder, R. G. Hilton
AbstractThe carbon cycle connects different reservoirs of C, including life on Earth, atmospheric CO2, and economically important geological reserves of C. Much of this C is in reduced (organic) form, and is composed of complex chemical structures that reflect diverse biological activity, processes and transformations.
ObjectiveA wealth of information is held within the complex organic molecules, both in the context of the contemporary carbon cycle and its links to is other biogeochemical cycles, as well as in relation to Earth's history, the evolution of life and climate on this planet.

In this course we will learn about the role of reduced forms of carbon in the global cycle, how these forms of carbon are produced, move around the planet, and become sequestered in the geological record, and how they can be used to infer biological activity and conditions on this planet in the geologic past. The course encompasses a range of spatial and temporal scales, from molecular to global, and from the contemporary environment to earliest life.
Prerequisites / NoticeThis course is good preparation for the combined Field-Lab Course: "651-4044-02 P Geomicrobiology and Biogeochemistry Field Course" and "651-4044-01 P Geomicrobiology and Biogeochemistry Lab Practical"
Structural Geology
Structural Geology: Compulsory Courses
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
651-4132-00LField Course IV: Non Alpine Field Course Information
Priority is given to D-ERDW students. If space is available UZH Geography and Earth System Sciences students may attend this field course at full cost.

No registration through myStudies. The registration for excursions and field courses goes through http://exkursionen.erdw.ethz.ch only.
O3 credits6PV. Picotti
AbstractGeological Mapping in the Jebel Akhdar window in Oman; unconformity between the Permian cover and the Proterozoic basement; excursion in the Sumail ophiolite.
ObjectiveUnderstanding of the pre-Alpine history of the Arabian Plate (southern margin of Tethys).
ContentGeological mapping in groups of 2 in Proterozoic and Palaeozoic sediments; distinguishing mappable formations and their description; sedimentological and structural analysis; visiting an ophiolite sequence; presentation and discussion of literature material related to the working area; reconstruction of the history of the area.
Final group reports to be handed within the week 10-17 February in ZH.
Lecture notesWill be handed out.
LiteratureWill be distributed
Prerequisites / NoticeSuccessful participation in Field Courses I-III and success to all courses of the Bachelor.

Geography and Earth System Sciences students UZH may attend this field course at full costs (no subsidies).

Students registering for the course confirm having read and accepted the terms and conditions for excursions and field courses of D-ERDW Link
651-4022-00LAdvanced Structural Geology with Field Course Information Restricted registration - show details
Due to the Corona pandemic priority is given to D-ERDW students completing their MSc studies in 2021.

If space is available UZH Geography and Earth System Sciences students may attend this field course at full cost.
O4 credits6PW. Behr
AbstractTo provide a theoretical grounding in advanced aspects of structural geology, as well as the practical application of structural field mapping techniques in complexly deformed areas.
ObjectiveTo learn to map, characterize, measure and analyze complex structures and multiple phases of deformation in the field. The purpose of the course is to give you an experience akin to doing real structural geology and tectonics research while exposing you to advanced aspects of structural analysis.
ContentThis course has shifted from a lecture-based course, to a field course with an associated term project. We will have ~4 introductory lectures prior to the field trip. The core of the class will be a field trip scheduled for Monday, April 22 to Friday, April 26 (1.5 days travel, 3.5 days in field) on Syros Island in Greece where you will learn to map, measure and analyse a wide range of different deformation fabric types related to Aegean subduction, exhumation and metamorphism. After the field trip, the rest of the semester you will be expected to write a journal-manuscript-style report describing and synthesizing your field data. We will likely not have formal lectures after the field trip, but myself and the TAs will have regular office hours where you can access us to discuss your data or ask questions regarding the report.
Prerequisites / NoticePrevious field mapping experience (field courses I, II and III for ETH Bachelor students or the equivalent for students admitted from elsewhere to the Master program); Structural Geology Course; Petrology/Petrography Course is recommended but not required.

Geography and Earth System Sciences students UZH may attend this lecture but will have to pay the full amount for the field course (no subsidies from UZH).

Students registering for the course confirm having read and accepted the terms and conditions for excursions and field courses of D-ERDW Link
Structural Geology: Courses of Choice
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
651-4134-00LTectonic Geomorphology Information Restricted registration - show details
Prerequisite for 651-4134-01L Tectonic Geomorphology Field Course

Priority is given to D-ERDW students. If space is available UZH Geography and Earth System Sciences students may attend this field course at full cost.
W3 credits2VE. Deal
AbstractCourse covers the theory and applications of tectonic geomorphology. Topics include the landscape response to an earthquake, use of fluvial terraces and other geomorphic markers to map uplift, methods of dating surfaces and landscapes, topographic evolution over active structures and landscape evolution of active mountain ranges. Methods include field mapping, DEM analysis and computer modeling.
ObjectiveTo learn theoretical and practical aspects of modern tectonic geomorphology. Classroom and computer-based analysis will be combined to provide hands-on experience with geomorphic data, analysis and modeling techniques. We will work through a series of practicals based on real world case studies that will build on the concepts learned in class.
ContentCourse includes a lecture component (in second half-semester) and a series of classroom practicals. Students should also register for the associated fieldtrip component, which will hopefully be able to take place. The fieldtrip will involve collecting field data from active structures in the Northern Apennines. Lecture component will include theoretical background and analysis of real world data.
LiteratureRequired Textbook: Tectonic Geomorphology, Burbank and Anderson, Blackwell.
Prerequisites / NoticeStudents should register for both lecture and field components (blockcourse). If the fieldtrip is able to take place, they will be graded together. Fieldtrip will be held during 1 week of the semester.

Geography and Earth System Sciences students UZH may attend the lecture but will have to pay the full amount for this field course (no subsidies from UZH).
651-4038-00LMicrostructures and Rock Rheology
Does not take place this semester.
W3 credits2GW. Behr
Abstract
Objective
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequisite includes Structural Geology. Petrology or Petrography course is strongly recommended.
651-4144-00LIntroduction to Finite Element Modelling in Geosciences Restricted registration - show details W2 credits3GA. Rozel, P. Sanan
AbstractIntroduction to programming the Finite Element Method (FEM) in 1D and 2D.
ObjectiveTopics covered include thermal diffusion, elasticity, Stokes flow, isoparametric elements, and code verification using the method of manufactured solutions. The focus is on hands-on programming, and you will learn how to write FEM codes starting with an empty MATLAB script.
ContentCourse content includes brief derivation and implementation details for the Finite Element Method (FEM) for thermal diffusion, linear elasticity, and incompressible Stokes flow, using numerical quadrature and isoparametric elements. 1-dimensional examples are extended to 2 dimensions. Code verification is introduced, using the method of manufactured solutions. The focus is on hands-on programming; course exercises encourage development of a series of increasingly-complex codes, starting with an empty MATLAB script. A final project allows students flexibility to apply the method to an application of interest or to a standard problem.

Note: proficient users of numerical Python are free to use that environment, instead of MATLAB.
Lecture notesThe script will be made available online.
LiteratureThere is no mandatory literature. Some recommended literature will be discussed and made available during the course.
Prerequisites / NoticeGood knowledge of MATLAB (or self-sufficiency with numerical Python), linear algebra, and knowledge of programming the finite difference method.

The following courses are recommended before attending this course:
651-4241-00L Numerical Modelling I and II: Theory and Applications
651-4007-00L Continuum Mechanics
651-4003-00L Numerical Modelling of Rock Deformation
Open Choice Modules Geology
Basin Analysis
Basin Analysis: Compulsory Courses
The compulsory courses of this module take place in autumn semester.
Basin Analysis: Courses of Choice
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
651-4134-00LTectonic Geomorphology Information Restricted registration - show details
Prerequisite for 651-4134-01L Tectonic Geomorphology Field Course

Priority is given to D-ERDW students. If space is available UZH Geography and Earth System Sciences students may attend this field course at full cost.
W3 credits2VE. Deal
AbstractCourse covers the theory and applications of tectonic geomorphology. Topics include the landscape response to an earthquake, use of fluvial terraces and other geomorphic markers to map uplift, methods of dating surfaces and landscapes, topographic evolution over active structures and landscape evolution of active mountain ranges. Methods include field mapping, DEM analysis and computer modeling.
ObjectiveTo learn theoretical and practical aspects of modern tectonic geomorphology. Classroom and computer-based analysis will be combined to provide hands-on experience with geomorphic data, analysis and modeling techniques. We will work through a series of practicals based on real world case studies that will build on the concepts learned in class.
ContentCourse includes a lecture component (in second half-semester) and a series of classroom practicals. Students should also register for the associated fieldtrip component, which will hopefully be able to take place. The fieldtrip will involve collecting field data from active structures in the Northern Apennines. Lecture component will include theoretical background and analysis of real world data.
LiteratureRequired Textbook: Tectonic Geomorphology, Burbank and Anderson, Blackwell.
Prerequisites / NoticeStudents should register for both lecture and field components (blockcourse). If the fieldtrip is able to take place, they will be graded together. Fieldtrip will be held during 1 week of the semester.

Geography and Earth System Sciences students UZH may attend the lecture but will have to pay the full amount for this field course (no subsidies from UZH).
651-4018-00LBorehole GeophysicsW3 credits3GM. Hertrich, X. Ma
AbstractThis introductory course on borehole geophysical methods covers the application of borehole logging and borehole-borehole and borehole-surface seismic, and radar imaging to rock mass and reservoir characterization. The principles of operation of various logging sondes will be covered as well as their application. The emphasis is on geotechnical rather than oil and gas well reservoir engineering.
ObjectiveThe course will introduce students to modern borehole logging techniques with the emphasis on geotechnical rather than oil and gas well reservoir engineering. Although the principles of operation of the various sondes will be covered, the primary focus will be on application. For a given problem in a given environment, the students should be able to design a logging program that will furnish the requisite information. They will also be able to extract information on rock mass/reservoir properties by combining curves from a suite of logs. The students will also learn about surface-to-borehole and borehole-to-borehole seismic methods for rock mass characterisation. This will include VSP and tomography.
Content- General introduction to geophysical logging

- Discussion of various logging types including
- Caliper logs
- Televiewer logs
- Flowmeter and temperature logs
- Resistivity logs
- Nuclear logs
- Sonic logs

- Suface-to-borehole and borehole-to-borehole methods
- Instrumentation
- Vertical seismic profiling
- Crosshole tomography
- Applications
Lecture notesA pdf copy of the lecture will be posted on the course website no later than the day before each class.
LiteratureWell logging for physical properties (A handbook for Geophysicists, Geologists and Engineers), 2nd Edition, Hearst, J.R., Nelson, P.H. and F.L. Paillet, John Wiley and Son, 2001. - Out of print.

Well logging for Earth Scientists, Ellis, D.V. and J.M. Singer, 2nd Edition, Springer, 2007. In print - cost Euro 33.
Prerequisites / NoticeStudents registering for the course confirm having read and accepted the terms and conditions for excursions and field courses of D-ERDW Link
651-4232-00LLow Temperature Thermochronology
Does not take place this semester.
W3 credits2GS. Willett
AbstractThis course presents the basic theory, methods and applications of low temperature thermochronometry, which is a fundamental tool used to study shallow crustal and earth-surface processes like burial and exhumation in orogenic belts and sedimentary basins.
ObjectiveThe objective of this course is to familiarize students with the use of thermochronometry as a tool to study shallow crustal and earth-surface processes such as burial and exhumation, brittle deformation and landform evolution.
ContentThis course presents the basic theory, methods and applications of low temperature thermochronometry. Methods covered include fission track dating, (U-Th)/He dating, and Argon dating. Theoretical aspects of track annealing, diffusion and closure of leaky systems are covered. Course includes laboratory exercises. Applications and modeling studies are presented and discussed based on select case studies.
Earthquake Seismology
Earthquake Seismology: Compulsory Courses
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
651-4103-00LEarthquakes II: Source PhysicsO3 credits2GA. P. Rinaldi, P. A. Selvadurai, E. R. Heimisson
AbstractThis course teaches the fundamental principles to understand physical processes leading to and governing earthquake source ruptures. To obtain that understanding we cover topics ranging from friction and fault mechanics up to earthquake source descriptions. The acquired understanding will be applied to a topic of choice to practice research skills.
ObjectiveThe aim of the course is to gain a fundamental understanding of the physical processes leading to and governing earthquake ruptures. This means that students will be able to:
- describe earthquake sources both conceptually and mathematically
- explain processes affecting earthquake nucleation, propagation and arrest
- explain processes affecting inter-, co-, and postseismic
- differentiate source kinematic and dynamic concepts
- interpret earthquake source properties from both perspectives
- derive fundamental equations in elasto-statistics and dynamics
- interpret earthquake occurrences and put them in perspective
- address fundamental questions in earthquake physics
- critically assess and discuss scientific literature
ContentWe will cover a range of topics, including:
- a summary of basics of earthquake mechanics: definitions, faults, elastic rebound theory, and source parameters
- Mathematical description of the source
- Representation theorem, point and extended sources, source spectra
- Source inversion
- Linear Elastic Fracture Mechanics quasi-static and dynamic
- Rupture nucleation, propagation and arrest
- Energy partitioning
- Fault mechanics and friction laws
- Earthquake statistics and interaction

After a theoretical understanding has been acquired, we invite students to apply this knowledge to their topic of preference by presenting a group of state-of-the-art and/or classical papers as a final project. This will require them to understand and evaluate current challenges and state-of-the-art practices in earthquake physics. Additionally, this stimulates participants to improve their skills to:
- critically analyze (to be) published papers
- disseminate knowledge within their own and neighboring research fields
- formulate their opinion, new ideas and broader implications
- present their findings to an audience
- ask questions and actively participate in discussions on new scientific ideas

An interactive laboratory demonstration will be performed and the data will be used to validate theoretical formulations discussed in class. The experiment will illuminate frictional behaviour and energy partitioning with first hand experience.

The course will be evaluated in 3 parts:
- a report on laboratory demonstration
- a presentation discussing a topic of chose based on a group of suggested papers
- an oral in-class examination with peer interaction

The course is worth 3 credit points, and a satisfactory total grade (4 or better) is needed to obtain 3 ECTS. The lab demonstration report has a weight of 20% and the presentation and oral in-class examination weigh for 40% each.
Lecture notesCourse notes will be made available on a designated course web site. An overview of the discussed principles are available in the three books mentioned below.
Literature- The Mechanics of Earthquakes and Faulting by Ch. Scholz (2002), Cambridge University Press

- Quantitative Seismology by K. Aki and P.G. Richards (2nd edition, 2002), University Science Books.

- Source Mechanisms of Earthquakes, Theory and Practice by Udias, Madariaga and Buforn (2014), Cambridge University Press.
Prerequisites / NoticeWe recommend to have taken Earthquakes 1: Seismotectonics, although a decent understanding of physics, mathematics (i.e. linear algebra, tensor calculus, and differential equations), seismology, and/or continuum mechanics can compensate for that.

The course will be given in English.
Earthquake Seismology: Compulsory Courses
One additional elective course of at least 3KP has to be completed for this Module according to prior agreement with the Study Advisor (Autumn or Spring Semester).
Geographic Information Systems
The courses of this module are offered by UZH and must be registered at UZH.
Geographic Information Systems: Compulsory Courses
The compulsory courses of this module take place in autumn semester.
Geographic Information Systems: Courses of Choice
The courses of choice may be chosen from the offerings of the department of Geography UZH according to prior approval by the lecturers of the GIS-group of UZH.
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
651-4278-00LMonitoring the Earth from Satellites: Radar Interferometry Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 30.
W3 credits3GA. Manconi
AbstractA novel and unique course on space-borne SAR tailored to geosciences. Students will develop independently projects on real case-studies by leveraging open source data and software. Students' performance will be assessed by peers and by an international steering committee during a mini-conference. The course is a pilot project in the Innovedum framework.
ObjectiveThe course aims at providing the tools to fully take advantage of space-borne SAR data in geoscience applications. The course will offer the chance to learn a cutting-edge remote sensing technique and to independently apply the methods to real scenarios relevant for their future activities as scientists and/or practitioners.
ContentThe activities of the course will show how to properly select and obtain SAR datasets, process them according to the state-of-art algorithms, interpret the results, evaluate pros and cons on specific geological targets, and integrate the analysis of SAR data with other survey and monitoring approaches. Moreover, practical exercises and field excursions are designed to pursue the “Learning by doing” concept.
Prerequisites / NoticeThis course requires a background in Earth Sciences, thus the tapriority is to MSc students of the D-ERDW. In the case the course attracts the attention of BSc, MSc, and PhD students from other ETH departments and/or other universities, they will be accepted provided that the maximum number of participants does not exceed15 per year.
Glaciology
Glaciology: Obligatorische Fächer
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
651-1504-00LSnowcover: Physics and ModellingO4 credits3GM.  Schneebeli, H. Löwe
AbstractSnow is a fascinating high-temperature material and relevant for applications in glaciology, hydrology, atmospheric sciences, polar climatology, remote sensing and natural hazards. This course introduces key concepts and underlying physical principles of snow, ranging from individual crystals to polar ice sheets.
ObjectiveThe course aims at a cross-disciplinary overview about the phenomenology of relevant processes in the snow cover, traditional and advanced experimental methods for snow measurements and theoretical foundations with key equations required for snow modeling. Tutorials and short presentations will also consider the bigger picture of snow physics with respect to climatology, hydrology and earth science.
ContentThe lectures will treat snow formation, crystal growth, snow microstructure, metamorphism, ice physics, snow mechanics, heat and mass transport in the snowcover, surface energy balance, snow models, wind transport, snow chemistry, electromagnetic properties, experimental techniques.

The tutorials include a demonstration/exercise part and a presentation part. The demonstration/exercise part consolidates key subjects of the lecture by means of small data sets, mathematical toy models, order of magnitude estimates, image analysis and visualization, small simulation examples, etc. The presentation part comprises short presentations (about 15 min) based on selected papers in the subject.

First practical experience with modern methods measuring snow properties can be acquired in a field excursion.
Lecture notesLecture notes and selected publications.
Prerequisites / NoticeWe strongly recommend the field excursion to Davos on Saturday, March 14, 2020, in Davos. We will demonstrate traditional and modern field-techniques (snow profile, Near-infrared photography, SnowMicroPen) and you will have the chance to use the instruments yourself. The excursion includes a visit of the SLF cold laboratories with the micro-tomography setup and the snowmaker.
Glaciology: Courses of Choice
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
101-0288-00LSnow and Avalanches: Processes and Risk ManagementW3 credits2GJ. Schweizer, S. L. Margreth
AbstractThe lecture covers snow and avalanche processes as well as preventive protection measures in the context of integral risk management.
Objective- basics of snow and avalanche mechanics
- methods to model snow and avalanche processes
- interaction of snow and avalanches with structures and forest
- methods of stability evaluation and hazard assessment
- avalanche protection measures in the context of integral risk management
- basics on the design and effectiveness of protection measures
ContentIntroduction, snow precipitation, extreme events, snow loads; snow and snow cover properties; snow-atmosphere interaction; avalanche formation; stability evaluation, avalanche forecasting; avalanche dynamics; avalanche impact on structures; hazard mapping; protection measures (permanent and temporary); integral risk management.
LiteratureArmstrong, R.L. and Brun, E. (Editors), 2008. Snow and Climate - Physical processes, surface energy exchange and modeling. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, U.K., 222 pp.

BUWAL/SLF, 1984. Richtlinien zur Berücksichtigung der Lawinengefahr bei raumwirksamen Tätigkeiten. EDMZ, Bern.

Egli, T., 2005. Wegleitung Objektschutz gegen gravitative Naturgefahren, Vereinigung Kantonaler Feuerversicherungen (Hrsg.), Bern.

Fierz, C., Armstrong, R.L., Durand , Y., Etchevers, P., Greene, E., McClung, D.M., Nishimura, K., Satyawali, P.K. and Sokratov, S.A., 2009. The International Classification for Seasonal Snow on the Ground. HP-VII Technical Documents in Hydrology, 83. UNESCO-IHP, Paris, France, 90 pp.

Furukawa, Y. and Wettlaufer, J.S., 2007. Snow and ice crystals. Physics Today, 60(12): 70-71.

Margreth, S., 2007. Technische Richtlinie für den Lawinenverbau im Anbruchgebiet. Bundesamt für Umwelt, Bern, WSL Eidg. Institut für Schnee- und Lawinenforschung Davos. 134 S.

McClung. D.M. and Schaerer, P. 2006. The Avalanche Handbook, 3rd ed., The Mountaineers, Seattle.

Mears, A.I., 1992. Snow-avalanche hazard analysis for land-use planning and engineering. 49, Colorado Geological Survey.

Schweizer, J., Bartelt, P. and van Herwijnen, A., 2015. Snow avalanches. In: W. Haeberli and C. Whiteman (Editors), Snow and Ice-Related Hazards, Risks and Disasters. Hazards and Disaster Series. Elsevier, pp. 395-436.

Schweizer, J., Jamieson, J.B. and Schneebeli, M., 2003. Snow avalanche formation. Reviews of Geophysics, 41(4): 1016, doi:10.1029/2002RG000123.

Shapiro, L.H., Johnson, J.B., Sturm, M. and Blaisdell, G.L., 1997. Snow mechanics - Review of the state of knowledge and applications. Report 97-3, US Army CRREL, Hanover, NH, U.S.A.
Prerequisites / NoticeFull-day excursion (not mandatory) to Davos, hands-on experience on selected topcis, visit at WSL Institute for Snow and Avalanche Research SLF (early March)
651-4162-00LField Course Glaciology Information
Priority is given to ETHZ students. If space is available UZH Geography and Earth System Sciences students may attend this field course at full cost.

No registration through myStudies. The registration for excursions and field courses goes through http://exkursionen.erdw.ethz.ch only (registration opens end of January 2021).
W3 credits6PA. Bauder, D. Farinotti, M. Werder
AbstractIntroduction to investigation methods in glaciology with both theory and experimental application. The students design, plan, and evaluate their individual projects, and present the results to their colleagues and the instructors.
Objective- Introduction to measurement techniques in glaciology
- Experience with realisation of measurement and data analysis
- Interpretation and presentation of results
ContentThe course covers methodologies and techniques to analyse physical conditions of glaciers and their evolution. Basic measurement techniques of surveying, drilling as well as working with sensors and data loggers are introduced. Covered fields include topographical setting, mass balance, glacier fluctuations, ice flow and glacier hydrology.
The course starts with an introduction toward the end of the spring semester and is followd by 8 days in August/September including lectures at ETH and field work on Rhonegletscher.
Prerequisites / NoticeBasic knowledge in glaciology e.g. course 651-3561-00L Kryosphäre is recommended.
This field course is organized in collaboration with the University of Hokkaido in Sapporo.

Students registering for the course confirm having read and accepted the terms and conditions for excursions and field courses of D-ERDW Link
651-1506-00LThe High-Mountain Cryosphere: Processes and Risks (University of Zurich)
No enrolment to this course at ETH Zurich. Book the corresponding module directly at UZH.
UZH Module Code: GEO856

Mind the enrolment deadlines at UZH:
https://www.uzh.ch/cmsssl/en/studies/application/deadlines.html
W3 credits2GUniversity lecturers
AbstractGlaciers in the climate system, ice ages, ice drill cores, natural hazards in glacier areas, sea level change.
ObjectiveSpecial knowledge about snow and ice, especially in high mountains
651-1513-00LField Studies on High Mountain Processes (University of Zurich)
No enrolment to this course at ETH Zurich. Book the corresponding module directly at UZH.
UZH Module Code: GEO411

Mind the enrolment deadlines at UZH:
https://www.uzh.ch/cmsssl/en/studies/application/deadlines.html
W6 credits2S + 4PUniversity lecturers
AbstractThe preparatory seminar introduces through practicals the theoretical background and methods as well as related equipment for conducting field-studies on processes in high mountain areas.
ObjectiveBesides getting familiar with specific methods and field equipment (including ice-penetrating radar, temperature logging, melt measurements and modelling, geomorphological mapping, sampling strategies, ...) it conveys the development and practical aspects of field-project studies in high mountains areas.
ContentThe module consists of two parts: (i) the preparatory seminar introducing the field-approaches and related background in practical seminars (4h, bi-weekly practicals in FS, compulsory). (ii) the field course (5-day, July, compulsory) in which the students work on their own project in the field (Tiefengletscher area, Albert Heim Hütte) using the methods and tools from the preparatory seminar. This module as a whole will also contribute to a deeper understanding of the physical processes and their interactions in high mountain areas.
Lecture notesCourse information and documents will be provided over OLAT, Fieldcourse guide
Prerequisites / NoticeModul GEO231 or equivalent
Lithosphere Structure and Tectonics
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
651-4096-00LInverse Theory I: BasicsO3 credits2VA. Fichtner
AbstractInverse theory is the art of inferring properties of a physical system from noisy and sparse observations. It is used to transform observations of waves into 3D images of a medium seismic tomography, medical imaging and material science; to constrain density in the Earth from gravity; to obtain probabilities of life on exoplanets ... . Inverse theory is at the heart of many natural sciences.
ObjectiveThe goal of this course is to enable students to develop a mathematical formulation of specific inference (inverse) problems that may arise anywhere in the physical sciences, and to implement suitable solution methods. Furthermore, students should become aware that nearly all relevant inverse problems are ill-posed, and that their meaningful solution requires the addition of prior knowledge in the form of expertise and physical intuition. This is what makes inverse theory an art.
ContentThis first of two courses covers the basics needed to address (and hopefully solve) any kind of inverse problem. Starting from the description of information in terms of probabilities, we will derive Bayes' Theorem, which forms the mathematical foundation of modern scientific inference. This will allow us to formalise the process of gaining information about a physical system using new observations. Following the conceptual part of the course, we will focus on practical solutions of inverse problems, which will lead us to study Monte Carlo methods and the special case of least-squares inversion.

In more detail, we aim to cover the following main topics:

1. The nature of observations and physical model parameters
2. Representing information by probabilities
3. Bayes' theorem and mathematical scientific inference
4. Random walks and Monte Carlo Methods
5. The Metropolis-Hastings algorithm
6. Simulated Annealing
7. Linear inverse problems and the least-squares method
8. Resolution and the nullspace
9. Basic concepts of iterative nonlinear inversion methods

While the concepts introduced in this course are universal, they will be illustrated with numerous simple and intuitive examples. These will be complemented with a collection of computer and programming exercises.

Prerequisites for this course include (i) basic knowledge of analysis and linear algebra, (ii) basic programming skills, for instance in Matlab or Python, and (iii) scientific curiosity.
Lecture notesPresentation slides and detailed lecture notes will be provided.
Prerequisites / NoticeThis course is offered as a half-semester course during the first part of the semester
Palaeontology
Palaeontology: Courses of Choice
Courses to be discussed with Palaeontological Institute (UZH) or Climate Geology Group.
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
651-1380-00LPalaeontological Excursions (University of Zürich) Information
No enrolment to this course at ETH Zurich. Book the corresponding module directly at UZH.
UZH Module Code: BIO279

Mind the enrolment deadlines at UZH:
https://www.uzh.ch/cmsssl/en/studies/application/deadlines.html
W1 credit1PUniversity lecturers
AbstractEin- oder zweitägige Geländeaufenthalte (eventuell mit Museumsbesuch) zum Vertiefen regionalgeologischer und erdgeschichtlicher Kenntnisse sowie zum Sammeln praktischer paläontologischer Erfahrungen.
ObjectiveBesuch von Fossilvorkommen im In- und Ausland, um die Erhaltung der Fossilien, die fazielle Ausbildung und die Stratigraphie der fossilführenden Schichten kennenzulernen und zu diskutieren sowie gegebe- nenfalls Fossilien zu sammeln.
ContentBevorzugte Ziele ein- und zweitägiger Exkursionen sind: Jura der Nordschweiz und von Süddeutschland. Kreide des westlichen Juragebirges und des Helvetikums. Mesozoikum des Südtessins, speziell des Monte San Giorgio. Molasse der weiteren Umgebung von Zürich.
Ziele mehrtägiger Exkursionen sind u. a.: Mesozoikum und Tertiär der Südalpen. Tertiär des Wiener Beckens. Paläozoikum der Eifel, des Barrandiums, von Gotland und von Wales. Jura von Südengland. Jura und Kreide von Südfrankreich. Paläozoikum und Mesozoikum in Spanien. Aktuopaläontologie im Watt der Nordsee.
651-1392-00LPalaeontological Colloquium (University of Zurich)
No enrolment to this course at ETH Zurich. Book the corresponding module directly at UZH.
UZH Module Code: BIO571

Mind the enrolment deadlines at UZH:
https://www.uzh.ch/cmsssl/en/studies/application/deadlines.html
Z0 credits1KUniversity lecturers
AbstractTalks and discussion on current topics in Palaeontology (Palaeobotany, Palaeozoology and Micropalaeontology).
ObjectiveSpezielle Vertiefung paläontologischer Kenntnisse.
ContentVorträge von Institutsangehörigen und eingeladenen Gästen aus dem In- und Ausland über aktuelle Themen aus dem Gesamtgebiet der Paläontologie (Paläobotanik, Paläozoologie und Mikropaläontologie) mit anschliessender Diskussion.
Palaeontology: Compulsory Courses
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
651-4044-04LMicropalaeontology and Molecular PalaeontologyO3 credits2GH. Stoll, C. De Jonge, T. I. Eglinton, I. Hernández Almeida
AbstractThe course aims to provide an introduction to the key micropaleontological and molecular fossils from marine and terrestrial niches, and the use of these fossils for reconstructing environmental and evolutionary changes.
ObjectiveThe course aims to provide an introduction to the key micropaleontological and molecular fossils from marine and terrestrial niches, and the use of these fossils for reconstructing environmental and evolutionary changes.

The course will include laboratory exercises with microscopy training: identification of plantonic foraminifera and the application of transfer functions, identification of calcareous nannoliths and estimation of water column structure and productivity with n-ratio, identification of major calcareous nannofossils for Mesozoic-cenozoic biostratigraphy, Quaternary radiolarian assemblages and estimation of diversity indices.
The course will include laboratory exercises on molecular markers include study of chlorin extracts, alkenone and TEX86 distributions and temperature reconstruction, and terrestrial leaf wax characterization, using GC-FID, LC-MS, and spectrophotometry.
ContentMicropaleontology and Molecular paleontology
1. Introduction to the domains of life and molecular and mineral fossils. Genomic classifications of domains of life. Biosynthesis and molecular fossils and preservation/degradation. Biomineralization and mineral fossils and preservation/dissolution. Review of stable isotopes in biosynthesis.
2. The planktic niche – primary producers. Resources and challenges of primary production in the marine photic zone – light supply, nutrient supply, water column structure and niche partitioning. Ecological strategies and specialization, bloom succession, diversity and size gradients in the modern ocean. Introduction to principal mineralizing phytoplankton – diatoms, coccolithophores, dynoflagellates, as well as cyanobacteria. Molecular markers including alkenones, long-chain diols and sterols, IP25, pigments, diatom UV-absorbing compounds. Application of fossils and markers as environmental proxies. Long term evolutionary evidence for originations, radiations, and extinctions in microfossils and biomarkers; evolution of size trends in phytoplankton over Cenozoic, geochemical evidence for evolution of carbon concentrating mechanisms. Introduction to nannofossil biostratigraphy.
3. The planktic niche – heterotrophy from bacteria to zooplankton. Resources and challenges of planktic heterotrophy – food supply, oxygen availability, seasonal cycles, seasonal and vertical niche partitioning. Introduction to principal mineralizing zooplankton planktic foraminifera and radiolaria: ecological strategies and specialization, succession, diversity and size gradients in the modern ocean. Morphometry and adaptations for symbiont hosting. Molecular records such as isorenieratene and Crenoarcheota GDGT; the debate of TEX86 temperature production. Long term evolutionary evidence for originations, radiations, and extinctions in microfossils; evolution of size and form, basic biostratigraphy. Molecular evidence of evolution including diversification of sterol/sterine assemblages.
4. The benthic niche – continental margins. Resources and challenges of benthic heterotrophy – food supply, oxygen, turbulence and substrate. Principal mineralizing benthic organisms – benthic foraminifera and ostracods. Benthic habitat gradients (infaunal and epifaunal; shallow to deep margin. Microbial redox ladder in sediments. Molecular markers of methanogenesis and methanotrophy, Anamox markers, pristine/phytane redox indicator. Applications of benthic communities for sea level reconstructions. Major originations and extinctions.
5. The benthic niche in the abyssal ocean. Resources and challenges of deep benthic heterotrophy. Benthic foraminifera, major extinctions and turnover events. Relationship to deep oxygen level and productivity.
6. Terrestrial dry niches -soils and trees. Resources and challenges - impacts of temperature, humidity, CO2 and soil moisture on terrestrial vegetation and microbial reaction and turnover. Introduction to pollen and molecular markers for soil pH, humidity, leaf wax C3-C4 community composition and hydrology. Long term evolution of C4 pathway, markers for angiosperm and gymnosperm evolution.
7. Terrestrial aquatic environments – resources and challenges. Lake systems, seasonal mixing regimes, eutrophication, closed/open systems. Introduction to lacustrine diatoms, chironomids, testate amoeba. Molecular markers in lake/box environments including paleogenomics of communities.
Lecture notesA lab and lecture manual will be distributed at the start of the course and additional material will be available in the course Moodle
LiteratureKey references from primary literature will be provided as pdf on the course moodle.
Prerequisites / NoticeTiming: The course starts on February 19 and ends on May 28. Prerequisites: Recall and remember what you learned in introductory chemistry and biology
Quaternary Geology and Geomorphology
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
651-4902-00LQuaternary Geology and Geomorphology of the Alps Information Restricted registration - show details
Geography and Earth System Sciences students UZH may attend the lecture but will have to pay the full amount for the excursion (no subsidies from UZH).
O3 credits2VS. Ivy Ochs, N. Akçar, U. H. Fischer
AbstractAfter a brief introduction to the scientific principles of glaciology, we survey the present state of knowledge on Pleistocene glacial periods and post-glacial landscape modification in the Alps. Emphasis is on understanding modes of formation of landscape elements attributable to glacial, glaciofluvial, periglacial, fluvial, hillslope, and mass wasting processes.
ObjectiveThrough a combination of lectures, classroom practical exercises, and field mapping of Quaternary landforms, an intuitive understanding of the formation and evolution of the landscape of the Alps and the forelands will be built up.
We focus on development of the following skills: landform recognition on remote imagery and in the field; depositional process identification based on sediment characterization; reconstruction of valley-scale geomorphological evolutionary sequences.
ContentThe following topics will be covered: glacier mass and energy balance; glacier motion; glacier hydrology; glacial erosion; glacial sediment balance; piedmont and valley glacier landsystems; till formation; glaciofluvial sediments; alluvial and debris-flow fan processes; Alpine rock slope failure landform/sediment associations; Alpine Quaternary stratigraphy; long-term uplift and denudation of the Alps.
Lecture notesSlides from the lectures will be made available.
LiteratureLists of key scientific articles will be given for each topic.
Relevant scientific articles will be distributed during the course.
Prerequisites / NoticeStudents registering for the course confirm having read and accepted the terms and conditions for excursions and field courses of D-ERDW Link

Required attendance at lectures and excurisions (several 1-day excursions during the semester and one 3-day field mapping session during the summer).

Geography and Earth System Sciences students UZH may attend this excursion at full costs (no subsidies from UZH).

Grading will be a combination of classroom participation, student presentations, practical exercises, field reports, and field maps from the excursions.
651-4134-00LTectonic Geomorphology Information Restricted registration - show details
Prerequisite for 651-4134-01L Tectonic Geomorphology Field Course

Priority is given to D-ERDW students. If space is available UZH Geography and Earth System Sciences students may attend this field course at full cost.
W3 credits2VE. Deal
AbstractCourse covers the theory and applications of tectonic geomorphology. Topics include the landscape response to an earthquake, use of fluvial terraces and other geomorphic markers to map uplift, methods of dating surfaces and landscapes, topographic evolution over active structures and landscape evolution of active mountain ranges. Methods include field mapping, DEM analysis and computer modeling.
ObjectiveTo learn theoretical and practical aspects of modern tectonic geomorphology. Classroom and computer-based analysis will be combined to provide hands-on experience with geomorphic data, analysis and modeling techniques. We will work through a series of practicals based on real world case studies that will build on the concepts learned in class.
ContentCourse includes a lecture component (in second half-semester) and a series of classroom practicals. Students should also register for the associated fieldtrip component, which will hopefully be able to take place. The fieldtrip will involve collecting field data from active structures in the Northern Apennines. Lecture component will include theoretical background and analysis of real world data.
LiteratureRequired Textbook: Tectonic Geomorphology, Burbank and Anderson, Blackwell.
Prerequisites / NoticeStudents should register for both lecture and field components (blockcourse). If the fieldtrip is able to take place, they will be graded together. Fieldtrip will be held during 1 week of the semester.

Geography and Earth System Sciences students UZH may attend the lecture but will have to pay the full amount for this field course (no subsidies from UZH).
651-1513-00LField Studies on High Mountain Processes (University of Zurich)
No enrolment to this course at ETH Zurich. Book the corresponding module directly at UZH.
UZH Module Code: GEO411

Mind the enrolment deadlines at UZH:
https://www.uzh.ch/cmsssl/en/studies/application/deadlines.html
W6 credits2S + 4PUniversity lecturers
AbstractThe preparatory seminar introduces through practicals the theoretical background and methods as well as related equipment for conducting field-studies on processes in high mountain areas.
ObjectiveBesides getting familiar with specific methods and field equipment (including ice-penetrating radar, temperature logging, melt measurements and modelling, geomorphological mapping, sampling strategies, ...) it conveys the development and practical aspects of field-project studies in high mountains areas.
ContentThe module consists of two parts: (i) the preparatory seminar introducing the field-approaches and related background in practical seminars (4h, bi-weekly practicals in FS, compulsory). (ii) the field course (5-day, July, compulsory) in which the students work on their own project in the field (Tiefengletscher area, Albert Heim Hütte) using the methods and tools from the preparatory seminar. This module as a whole will also contribute to a deeper understanding of the physical processes and their interactions in high mountain areas.
Lecture notesCourse information and documents will be provided over OLAT, Fieldcourse guide
Prerequisites / NoticeModul GEO231 or equivalent
Remote Sensing
The courses of this module are offered by UZH and must be registered at UZH.
Remote Sensing: Compulsory Courses
The compulsory courses for this module take place in autumn semester.
Remote Sensing: Courses of Choice
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
651-2332-00LSpecializing in Remote Sensing Seminar and Colloquium (University of Zurich)
No enrolment to this course at ETH Zurich. Book the corresponding module directly at UZH.
UZH Module Code: GEO441

Mind the enrolment deadlines at UZH:
https://www.uzh.ch/cmsssl/en/studies/application/deadlines.html
W6 credits1S + 2KUniversity lecturers
AbstractThis course is composed of the remote sensing colloquium, which offers scientific talks on diverse remote sensing topics, and the seminar, which tackles various research questions in group projects.
Objectivehe colloquium serves the purpose of broadening the view on remote sensing related topics as well as fostering international contacts and cooperation. Furthermore, it offers a forum to engage in scientific discussions on remote sensing topics.
The seminar is a platform to get involved in a group project, which highlights the need for teamwork and collaboration in most working environments. Students will be able to bring all previously acquired skills to the table to develop concepts, analyze datasets and discuss results. Furthermore, they will improve their scientific writing and presentation skills.
ContentThe choice of specific hypotheses being tested on the dataset is more open than in other courses. After the full analysis has been applied (including processing steps developed within the group), the results will be written up in a project report, and also presented in a mini- colloquium. Together with the content of the work, scientific writing and presentation skills will be evaluated and discussed. During the first lecture, groups will be formed and topics distributed. Not attending without notice may result in working alone on a topic.
651-4278-00LMonitoring the Earth from Satellites: Radar Interferometry Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 30.
W3 credits3GA. Manconi
AbstractA novel and unique course on space-borne SAR tailored to geosciences. Students will develop independently projects on real case-studies by leveraging open source data and software. Students' performance will be assessed by peers and by an international steering committee during a mini-conference. The course is a pilot project in the Innovedum framework.
ObjectiveThe course aims at providing the tools to fully take advantage of space-borne SAR data in geoscience applications. The course will offer the chance to learn a cutting-edge remote sensing technique and to independently apply the methods to real scenarios relevant for their future activities as scientists and/or practitioners.
ContentThe activities of the course will show how to properly select and obtain SAR datasets, process them according to the state-of-art algorithms, interpret the results, evaluate pros and cons on specific geological targets, and integrate the analysis of SAR data with other survey and monitoring approaches. Moreover, practical exercises and field excursions are designed to pursue the “Learning by doing” concept.
Prerequisites / NoticeThis course requires a background in Earth Sciences, thus the tapriority is to MSc students of the D-ERDW. In the case the course attracts the attention of BSc, MSc, and PhD students from other ETH departments and/or other universities, they will be accepted provided that the maximum number of participants does not exceed15 per year.
Shallow Earth Geophysics
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
651-4106-03LGeophysical Field Work and Processing: Preparation and Field Work Information O7 credits3V + 11PC. Schmelzbach, P. Nagy, A. Wieser
AbstractThe 'Preparation' and 'Field Work' parts of 'Geophysical Field Work and Processing' involve the planing and conducting of a near-surface geophysical field campaign using common geophysical techniques to study, for example, archeological remains, internal structures of landslides or aquifers. Students work in small groups, and plan, acquire, process and document a field campaign together.
ObjectiveStudents should acquire the knowledge to (1) design and plan a geophysical survey appropriate for the target of investigation, (2) acquire geophysical data, (3) process the data using state-of-the-art techniques and software, (3) analyze and interpret the results, and (4) write a report according to commercial and scientific standards.
ContentThe course is split into two parts:

1. 'Preparation': Introductory lectures and exercises (lab and field) covering Geographical Information Systems (GIS), surveying, and introductions to the field sites. Participation in the 'Preparation' part is a REQUIREMENT to participate in the 'Field Work' part.

2. 'Field Work': Four-weeks field course. The students work in groups on the following topics:
- Planning and design of a comprehensive geophysical survey
- Data acquisition
- Data processing and inversion
- Interpretation of the results
- Report writing
Lecture notesRelevant reading material, manuals and instructions for all methods of the field course will be handed out to each group at the beginning of the 'Field Work' part (beginning of June).
Prerequisites / NoticeA "pass" (Swiss grade 4.0 or higher) in the written examination of 651-4104-00 V Geophysical Fieldwork and Processing: Methods, is an absolute REQUIREMENT to participate in this course.

Students registering for the course confirm having read and accepted the terms and conditions for excursions and field courses of D-ERDW Link
651-4018-00LBorehole GeophysicsO3 credits3GM. Hertrich, X. Ma
AbstractThis introductory course on borehole geophysical methods covers the application of borehole logging and borehole-borehole and borehole-surface seismic, and radar imaging to rock mass and reservoir characterization. The principles of operation of various logging sondes will be covered as well as their application. The emphasis is on geotechnical rather than oil and gas well reservoir engineering.
ObjectiveThe course will introduce students to modern borehole logging techniques with the emphasis on geotechnical rather than oil and gas well reservoir engineering. Although the principles of operation of the various sondes will be covered, the primary focus will be on application. For a given problem in a given environment, the students should be able to design a logging program that will furnish the requisite information. They will also be able to extract information on rock mass/reservoir properties by combining curves from a suite of logs. The students will also learn about surface-to-borehole and borehole-to-borehole seismic methods for rock mass characterisation. This will include VSP and tomography.
Content- General introduction to geophysical logging

- Discussion of various logging types including
- Caliper logs
- Televiewer logs
- Flowmeter and temperature logs
- Resistivity logs
- Nuclear logs
- Sonic logs

- Suface-to-borehole and borehole-to-borehole methods
- Instrumentation
- Vertical seismic profiling
- Crosshole tomography
- Applications
Lecture notesA pdf copy of the lecture will be posted on the course website no later than the day before each class.
LiteratureWell logging for physical properties (A handbook for Geophysicists, Geologists and Engineers), 2nd Edition, Hearst, J.R., Nelson, P.H. and F.L. Paillet, John Wiley and Son, 2001. - Out of print.

Well logging for Earth Scientists, Ellis, D.V. and J.M. Singer, 2nd Edition, Springer, 2007. In print - cost Euro 33.
Prerequisites / NoticeStudents registering for the course confirm having read and accepted the terms and conditions for excursions and field courses of D-ERDW Link
651-4109-00LGeothermal EnergyO3 credits4GM. O. Saar, P. Bayer, E. Rossi, F. Samrock
AbstractThe course will introduce students to the general principles of Geothermics and is suitable for students who have a basic knowledge of Geoscience or Environmental Science (equivalent of a Bachelor degree).
ObjectiveTo provide students with a broad understanding of the systems used to exploit geothermal energy in diverse settings.
ContentThe course will begin with an overview of heat generation and the thermal structure of the Earth. The basic theory describing the flow of heat in the shallow crust will be covered, as will be the methods used to measure it. Petrophysical parameters of relevance to Geothermics, such as thermal conductivity, heat capacity and radiogenic heat productivity, are described together with the laboratory and borehole measurement techniques used to estimate their values. The focus will then shift towards the exploitation of geothermal heat at various depths and temperatures, ranging from electricity and heat production in various types of deep geothermal systems (including high and medium temperature hydrothermal systems, and Engineered Geothermal Systems at depths of 5 km or more), to ground-source heat pumps installed in boreholes at depths of a few tens to hundreds of meters for heating domestic houses.
The subjects covered are as follows:
Week 1: Introduction. Earth's thermal structure. Conductive heat flow
Week 2: Heat flow measurement. Advective heat flow. Petrophysical parameters and their measurement.
Week 3: Temperature measurement. Hydrothermal reservoirs & well productivity
Week 4: Hydrological characterisation of reservoirs. Drilling. Optimized systems
Week 5: Petrothermal or Engineered Geothermal Systems
Week 6: Low-enthalpy systems 1
Week 7: Low-enthalpy systems 2.
Lecture notesThe script for each class will be available for download from the Ilias website no later than 1 day before the class.
Modules from the Engineering Geology Major
» Choice from Engineering Geology Required Modules
Modules from the Geophysics Major
» Choice from Geophysics Compulsory Modules
» Choice from Geophysics Restricted Choice Modules
Modules from the Mineralogy and Geochemistry Major
» Choice from the Mineralogy and Geochemistry Restricted Choice Modules
Modules from the Major Geology Restricted Choice Modules
» Choice from the Geology Restricted Choice Modules