Suchergebnis: Katalogdaten im Frühjahrssemester 2020

Data Science Master Information
Kernfächer
Datenanalyse
Information and Learning
NummerTitelTypECTSUmfangDozierende
227-0434-10LMathematics of Information Information W8 KP3V + 2U + 2AH. Bölcskei
KurzbeschreibungThe class focuses on mathematical aspects of

1. Information science: Sampling theorems, frame theory, compressed sensing, sparsity, super-resolution, spectrum-blind sampling, subspace algorithms, dimensionality reduction

2. Learning theory: Approximation theory, uniform laws of large numbers, Rademacher complexity, Vapnik-Chervonenkis dimension
LernzielThe aim of the class is to familiarize the students with the most commonly used mathematical theories in data science, high-dimensional data analysis, and learning theory. The class consists of the lecture, exercise sessions with homework problems, and of a research project, which can be carried out either individually or in groups. The research project consists of either 1. software development for the solution of a practical signal processing or machine learning problem or 2. the analysis of a research paper or 3. a theoretical research problem of suitable complexity. Students are welcome to propose their own project at the beginning of the semester. The outcomes of all projects have to be presented to the entire class at the end of the semester.
InhaltMathematics of Information

1. Signal representations: Frame theory, wavelets, Gabor expansions, sampling theorems, density theorems

2. Sparsity and compressed sensing: Sparse linear models, uncertainty relations in sparse signal recovery, matching pursuits, super-resolution, spectrum-blind sampling, subspace algorithms (MUSIC, ESPRIT, matrix pencil), estimation in the high-dimensional noisy case, Lasso

3. Dimensionality reduction: Random projections, the Johnson-Lindenstrauss Lemma

Mathematics of Learning

4. Approximation theory: Nonlinear approximation theory, fundamental limits on compressibility of signal classes, Kolmogorov-Tikhomirov epsilon-entropy of signal classes, optimal compression of signal classes, recovery from incomplete data, information-based complexity, curse of dimensionality

5. Uniform laws of large numbers: Rademacher complexity, Vapnik-Chervonenkis dimension, classes with polynomial discrimination, blessings of dimensionality
SkriptDetailed lecture notes will be provided at the beginning of the semester and as we go along.
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesThis course is aimed at students with a background in basic linear algebra, analysis, statistics, and probability.

We encourage students who are interested in mathematical data science to take both this course and "401-4944-20L Mathematics of Data Science" by Prof. A. Bandeira. The two courses are designed to be complementary.

H. Bölcskei and A. Bandeira
Statistics
NummerTitelTypECTSUmfangDozierende
401-3632-00LComputational StatisticsW8 KP3V + 1UM. H. Maathuis
KurzbeschreibungWe discuss modern statistical methods for data analysis, including methods for data exploration, prediction and inference. We pay attention to algorithmic aspects, theoretical properties and practical considerations. The class is hands-on and methods are applied using the statistical programming language R.
LernzielThe student obtains an overview of modern statistical methods for data analysis, including their algorithmic aspects and theoretical properties. The methods are applied using the statistical programming language R.
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesAt least one semester of (basic) probability and statistics.

Programming experience is helpful but not required.
Datenmanagement und Datenverarbeitung
NummerTitelTypECTSUmfangDozierende
261-5110-00LOptimization for Data Science Information W8 KP3V + 2U + 2AB. Gärtner, D. Steurer
KurzbeschreibungThis course provides an in-depth theoretical treatment of optimization methods that are particularly relevant in data science.
LernzielUnderstanding the theoretical guarantees (and their limits) of relevant optimization methods used in data science. Learning general paradigms to deal with optimization problems arising in data science.
InhaltThis course provides an in-depth theoretical treatment of optimization methods that are particularly relevant in machine learning and data science.

In the first part of the course, we will first give a brief introduction to convex optimization, with some basic motivating examples from machine learning. Then we will analyse classical and more recent first and second order methods for convex optimization: gradient descent, projected gradient descent, subgradient descent, stochastic gradient descent, Nesterov's accelerated method, Newton's method, and Quasi-Newton methods. The emphasis will be on analysis techniques that occur repeatedly in convergence analyses for various classes of convex functions. We will also discuss some classical and recent theoretical results for nonconvex optimization.

In the second part, we discuss convex programming relaxations as a powerful and versatile paradigm for designing efficient algorithms to solve computational problems arising in data science. We will learn about this paradigm and develop a unified perspective on it through the lens of the sum-of-squares semidefinite programming hierarchy. As applications, we are discussing non-negative matrix factorization, compressed sensing and sparse linear regression, matrix completion and phase retrieval, as well as robust estimation.
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesAs background, we require material taught in the course "252-0209-00L Algorithms, Probability, and Computing". It is not necessary that participants have actually taken the course, but they should be prepared to catch up if necessary.
Wählbare Kernfächer
NummerTitelTypECTSUmfangDozierende
151-0566-00LRecursive Estimation Information W4 KP2V + 1UR. D'Andrea
KurzbeschreibungEstimation of the state of a dynamic system based on a model and observations in a computationally efficient way.
LernzielLearn the basic recursive estimation methods and their underlying principles.
InhaltIntroduction to state estimation; probability review; Bayes' theorem; Bayesian tracking; extracting estimates from probability distributions; Kalman filter; extended Kalman filter; particle filter; observer-based control and the separation principle.
SkriptLecture notes available on course website: http://www.idsc.ethz.ch/education/lectures/recursive-estimation.html
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesRequirements: Introductory probability theory and matrix-vector algebra.
227-0150-00LSystems-on-chip for Data Analytics and Machine Learning
Previously "Energy-Efficient Parallel Computing Systems for Data Analytics"
W6 KP4GL. Benini
KurzbeschreibungSystems-on-chip architecture and related design issues with a focus on machine learning and data analytics applications. It will cover multi-cores, many-cores, vector engines, GP-GPUs, application-specific processors and heterogeneous compute accelerators. Special emphasis given to energy-efficiency issues and hardware-software techniques for power and energy minimization.
LernzielGive in-depth understanding of the links and dependencies between architectures and their energy-efficient implementation and to get a comprehensive exposure to state-of-the-art systems-on-chip platforms for machine learning and data analytics. Practical experience will also be gained through practical exercises and mini-projects (hardware and software) assigned on specific topics.
InhaltThe course will cover advanced system-on-chip architectures, with an in-depth view on design challenges related to advanced silicon technology and state-of-the-art system integration options (nanometer silicon technology, novel storage devices, three-dimensional integration, advanced system packaging). The emphasis will be on programmable parallel architectures with application focus on machine learning and data analytics. The main SoC architectural families will be covered: namely, multi and many- cores, GPUs, vector accelerators, application-specific processors, heterogeneous platforms. The course will cover the complex design choices required to achieve scalability and energy proportionality. The course will will also delve into system design, touching on hardware-software tradeoffs and full-system analysis and optimization taking into account non-functional constraints and quality metrics, such as power consumption, thermal dissipation, reliability and variability. The application focus will be on machine learning both in the cloud and at the edges (near-sensor analytics).
SkriptSlides will be provided to accompany lectures. Pointers to scientific literature will be given. Exercise scripts and tutorials will be provided.
LiteraturJohn L. Hennessy, David A. Patterson, Computer Architecture: A Quantitative Approach (The Morgan Kaufmann Series in Computer Architecture and Design) 6th Edition, 2017.
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesKnowledge of digital design at the level of "Design of Digital Circuits SS12" is required.

Knowledge of basic VLSI design at the level of "VLSI I: Architectures of VLSI Circuits" is required
227-0155-00LMachine Learning on Microcontrollers Belegung eingeschränkt - Details anzeigen
Registration in this class requires the permission of the instructors. Class size will be limited to 30.
Preference is given to students in the MSc EEIT.
W6 KP3G + 2AM. Magno, L. Benini
KurzbeschreibungMachine Learning (ML) and artificial intelligence are pervading the digital society. Today, even low power embedded systems are incorporating ML, becoming increasingly “smart”. This lecture gives an overview of ML methods and algorithms to process and extract useful near-sensor information in end-nodes of the “internet-of-things”, using low-power microcontrollers/ processors (ARM-Cortex-M; RISC-V)
LernzielLearn how to Process data from sensors and how to extract useful information with low power microprocessors using ML techniques. We will analyze data coming from real low-power sensors (accelerometers, microphones, ExG bio-signals, cameras…). The main objective is to study in details how Machine Learning algorithms can be adapted to the performance constraints and limited resources of low-power microcontrollers.
InhaltThe final goal of the course is a deep understanding of machine learning and its practical implementation on single- and multi-core microcontrollers, coupled with performance and energy efficiency analysis and optimization. The main topics of the course include:

- Sensors and sensor data acquisition with low power embedded systems

- Machine Learning: Overview of supervised and unsupervised learning and in particular supervised learning (Bayes Decision Theory, Decision Trees, Random Forests, kNN-Methods, Support Vector Machines, Convolutional Networks and Deep Learning)

- Low-power embedded systems and their architecture. Low Power microcontrollers (ARM-Cortex M) and RISC-V-based Parallel Ultra Low Power (PULP) systems-on-chip.

- Low power smart sensor system design: hardware-software tradeoffs, analysis, and optimization. Implementation and performance evaluation of ML in battery-operated embedded systems.

The laboratory exercised will show how to address concrete design problems, like motion, gesture recognition, emotion detection, image and sound classification, using real sensors data and real MCU boards.

Presentations from Ph.D. students and the visit to the Digital Circuits and Systems Group will introduce current research topics and international research projects.
SkriptScript and exercise sheets. Books will be suggested during the course.
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesPrerequisites: Good experience in C language programming. Microprocessors and computer architecture. Basics of Digital Signal Processing. Some exposure to machine learning concepts is also desirable.
227-0224-00LStochastic SystemsW4 KP2V + 1UF. Herzog
KurzbeschreibungProbability. Stochastic processes. Stochastic differential equations. Ito. Kalman filters. St Stochastic optimal control. Applications in financial engineering.
LernzielStochastic dynamic systems. Optimal control and filtering of stochastic systems. Examples in technology and finance.
Inhalt- Stochastic processes
- Stochastic calculus (Ito)
- Stochastic differential equations
- Discrete time stochastic difference equations
- Stochastic processes AR, MA, ARMA, ARMAX, GARCH
- Kalman filter
- Stochastic optimal control
- Applications in finance and engineering
SkriptH. P. Geering et al., Stochastic Systems, Measurement and Control Laboratory, 2007 and handouts
227-0420-00LInformation Theory II Information
Findet dieses Semester nicht statt.
W6 KP2V + 2UA. Lapidoth
KurzbeschreibungThis course builds on Information Theory I. It introduces additional topics in single-user communication, connections between Information Theory and Statistics, and Network Information Theory.
LernzielThe course has two objectives: to introduce the students to the key information theoretic results that underlay the design of communication systems and to equip the students with the tools that are needed to conduct research in Information Theory.
InhaltDifferential entropy, maximum entropy, the Gaussian channel and water filling, the entropy-power inequality, Sanov's Theorem, Fisher information, the broadcast channel, the multiple-access channel, Slepian-Wolf coding, and the Gelfand-Pinsker problem.
Skriptn/a
LiteraturT.M. Cover and J.A. Thomas, Elements of Information Theory, second edition, Wiley 2006
227-0558-00LPrinciples of Distributed Computing Information W7 KP2V + 2U + 2AR. Wattenhofer, M. Ghaffari
KurzbeschreibungWe study the fundamental issues underlying the design of distributed systems: communication, coordination, fault-tolerance, locality, parallelism, self-organization, symmetry breaking, synchronization, uncertainty. We explore essential algorithmic ideas and lower bound techniques.
LernzielDistributed computing is essential in modern computing and communications systems. Examples are on the one hand large-scale networks such as the Internet, and on the other hand multiprocessors such as your new multi-core laptop. This course introduces the principles of distributed computing, emphasizing the fundamental issues underlying the design of distributed systems and networks: communication, coordination, fault-tolerance, locality, parallelism, self-organization, symmetry breaking, synchronization, uncertainty. We explore essential algorithmic ideas and lower bound techniques, basically the "pearls" of distributed computing. We will cover a fresh topic every week.
InhaltDistributed computing models and paradigms, e.g. message passing, shared memory, synchronous vs. asynchronous systems, time and message complexity, peer-to-peer systems, small-world networks, social networks, sorting networks, wireless communication, and self-organizing systems.

Distributed algorithms, e.g. leader election, coloring, covering, packing, decomposition, spanning trees, mutual exclusion, store and collect, arrow, ivy, synchronizers, diameter, all-pairs-shortest-path, wake-up, and lower bounds
SkriptAvailable. Our course script is used at dozens of other universities around the world.
LiteraturLecture Notes By Roger Wattenhofer. These lecture notes are taught at about a dozen different universities through the world.

Distributed Computing: Fundamentals, Simulations and Advanced Topics
Hagit Attiya, Jennifer Welch.
McGraw-Hill Publishing, 1998, ISBN 0-07-709352 6

Introduction to Algorithms
Thomas Cormen, Charles Leiserson, Ronald Rivest.
The MIT Press, 1998, ISBN 0-262-53091-0 oder 0-262-03141-8

Disseminatin of Information in Communication Networks
Juraj Hromkovic, Ralf Klasing, Andrzej Pelc, Peter Ruzicka, Walter Unger.
Springer-Verlag, Berlin Heidelberg, 2005, ISBN 3-540-00846-2

Introduction to Parallel Algorithms and Architectures: Arrays, Trees, Hypercubes
Frank Thomson Leighton.
Morgan Kaufmann Publishers Inc., San Francisco, CA, 1991, ISBN 1-55860-117-1

Distributed Computing: A Locality-Sensitive Approach
David Peleg.
Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics (SIAM), 2000, ISBN 0-89871-464-8
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesCourse pre-requisites: Interest in algorithmic problems. (No particular course needed.)
227-0560-00LDeep Learning for Autonomous Driving Information Belegung eingeschränkt - Details anzeigen
Registration in this class requires the permission of the instructors. Class size will be limited to 80 students.
Preference is given to EEIT, INF and RSC students.
W6 KP3V + 2PD. Dai, A. Liniger
KurzbeschreibungAutonomous driving has moved from the realm of science fiction to a very real possibility during the past twenty years, largely due to rapid developments of deep learning approaches, automotive sensors, and microprocessor capacity. This course covers the core techniques required for building a self-driving car, especially the practical use of deep learning through this theme.
LernzielStudents will learn about the fundamental aspects of a self-driving car. They will also learn to use modern automotive sensors and HD navigational maps, and to implement, train and debug their own deep neural networks in order to gain a deep understanding of cutting-edge research in autonomous driving tasks, including perception, localization and control.

After attending this course, students will:
1) understand the core technologies of building a self-driving car;
2) have a good overview over the current state of the art in self-driving cars;
3) be able to critically analyze and evaluate current research in this area;
4) be able to implement basic systems for multiple autonomous driving tasks.
InhaltWe will focus on teaching the following topics centered on autonomous driving: deep learning, automotive sensors, multimodal driving datasets, road scene perception, ego-vehicle localization, path planning, and control.

The course covers the following main areas:

I) Foundation
a) Fundamentals of a self-driving car
b) Fundamentals of deep-learning


II) Perception
a) Semantic segmentation and lane detection
b) Depth estimation with images and sparse LiDAR data
c) 3D object detection with images and LiDAR data
d) Object tracking and motion prediction

III) Localization
a) GPS-based and Vision-based Localization
b) Visual Odometry and Lidar Odometry

IV) Path Planning and Control
a) Path planning for autonomous driving
b) Motion planning and vehicle control
c) Imitation learning and reinforcement learning for self driving cars

The exercise projects will involve training complex neural networks and applying them on real-world, multimodal driving datasets. In particular, students should be able to develop systems that deal with the following problems:
- Sensor calibration and synchronization to obtain multimodal driving data;
- Semantic segmentation and depth estimation with deep neural networks ;
- Learning to drive with images and map data directly (a.k.a. end-to-end driving)
SkriptThe lecture slides will be provided as a PDF.
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesThis is an advanced grad-level course. Students must have taken courses on machine learning and computer vision or have acquired equivalent knowledge. Students are expected to have a solid mathematical foundation, in particular in linear algebra, multivariate calculus, and probability. All practical exercises will require basic knowledge of Python and will use libraries such as PyTorch, scikit-learn and scikit-image.
252-0211-00LInformation Security Information W8 KP4V + 3UD. Basin, S. Capkun, R. Sasse
KurzbeschreibungThis course provides an introduction to Information Security. The focus
is on fundamental concepts and models, basic cryptography, protocols and system security, and privacy and data protection. While the emphasis is on foundations, case studies will be given that examine different realizations of these ideas in practice.
LernzielMaster fundamental concepts in Information Security and their
application to system building. (See objectives listed below for more details).
Inhalt1. Introduction and Motivation (OBJECTIVE: Broad conceptual overview of information security) Motivation: implications of IT on society/economy, Classical security problems, Approaches to
defining security and security goals, Abstractions, assumptions, and trust, Risk management and the human factor, Course verview. 2. Foundations of Cryptography (OBJECTIVE: Understand basic
cryptographic mechanisms and applications) Introduction, Basic concepts in cryptography: Overview, Types of Security, computational hardness, Abstraction of channel security properties, Symmetric
encryption, Hash functions, Message authentication codes, Public-key distribution, Public-key cryptosystems, Digital signatures, Application case studies, Comparison of encryption at different layers, VPN, SSL, Digital payment systems, blind signatures, e-cash, Time stamping 3. Key Management and Public-key Infrastructures (OBJECTIVE: Understand the basic mechanisms relevant in an Internet context) Key management in distributed systems, Exact characterization of requirements, the role of trust, Public-key Certificates, Public-key Infrastructures, Digital evidence and non-repudiation, Application case studies, Kerberos, X.509, PGP. 4. Security Protocols (OBJECTIVE: Understand network-oriented security, i.e.. how to employ building blocks to secure applications in (open) networks) Introduction, Requirements/properties, Establishing shared secrets, Principal and message origin authentication, Environmental assumptions, Dolev-Yao intruder model and
variants, Illustrative examples, Formal models and reasoning, Trace-based interleaving semantics, Inductive verification, or model-checking for falsification, Techniques for protocol design,
Application case study 1: from Needham-Schroeder Shared-Key to Kerberos, Application case study 2: from DH to IKE. 5. Access Control and Security Policies (OBJECTIVES: Study system-oriented security, i.e., policies, models, and mechanisms) Motivation (relationship to CIA, relationship to Crypto) and examples Concepts: policies versus models versus mechanisms, DAC and MAC, Modeling formalism, Access Control Matrix Model, Roll Based Access Control, Bell-LaPadula, Harrison-Ruzzo-Ullmann, Information flow, Chinese Wall, Biba, Clark-Wilson, System mechanisms: Operating Systems, Hardware Security Features, Reference Monitors, File-system protection, Application case studies 6. Anonymity and Privacy (OBJECTIVE: examine protection goals beyond standard CIA and corresponding mechanisms) Motivation and Definitions, Privacy, policies and policy languages, mechanisms, problems, Anonymity: simple mechanisms (pseudonyms, proxies), Application case studies: mix networks and crowds. 7. Larger application case study: GSM, mobility
252-0526-00LStatistical Learning Theory Information W7 KP3V + 2U + 1AJ. M. Buhmann, C. Cotrini Jimenez
KurzbeschreibungThe course covers advanced methods of statistical learning:

- Variational methods and optimization.
- Deterministic annealing.
- Clustering for diverse types of data.
- Model validation by information theory.
LernzielThe course surveys recent methods of statistical learning. The fundamentals of machine learning, as presented in the courses "Introduction to Machine Learning" and "Advanced Machine Learning", are expanded from the perspective of statistical learning.
Inhalt- Variational methods and optimization. We consider optimization approaches for problems where the optimizer is a probability distribution. We will discuss concepts like maximum entropy, information bottleneck, and deterministic annealing.

- Clustering. This is the problem of sorting data into groups without using training samples. We discuss alternative notions of "similarity" between data points and adequate optimization procedures.

- Model selection and validation. This refers to the question of how complex the chosen model should be. In particular, we present an information theoretic approach for model validation.

- Statistical physics models. We discuss approaches for approximately optimizing large systems, which originate in statistical physics (free energy minimization applied to spin glasses and other models). We also study sampling methods based on these models.
SkriptA draft of a script will be provided. Lecture slides will be made available.
LiteraturHastie, Tibshirani, Friedman: The Elements of Statistical Learning, Springer, 2001.

L. Devroye, L. Gyorfi, and G. Lugosi: A probabilistic theory of pattern recognition. Springer, New York, 1996
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesKnowledge of machine learning (introduction to machine learning and/or advanced machine learning)
Basic knowledge of statistics.
252-0538-00LShape Modeling and Geometry Processing Information W6 KP2V + 1U + 2AO. Sorkine Hornung
KurzbeschreibungThis course covers the fundamentals and some of the latest developments in geometric modeling and geometry processing. Topics include surface modeling based on point clouds and polygonal meshes, mesh generation, surface reconstruction, mesh fairing and parameterization, discrete differential geometry, interactive shape editing, topics in digital shape fabrication.
LernzielThe students will learn how to design, program and analyze algorithms and systems for interactive 3D shape modeling and geometry processing.
InhaltRecent advances in 3D geometry processing have created a plenitude of novel concepts for the mathematical representation and interactive manipulation of geometric models. This course covers the fundamentals and some of the latest developments in geometric modeling and geometry processing. Topics include surface modeling based on point clouds and triangle meshes, mesh generation, surface reconstruction, mesh fairing and parameterization, discrete differential geometry, interactive shape editing and digital shape fabrication.
SkriptSlides and course notes
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesPrerequisites:
Visual Computing, Computer Graphics or an equivalent class. Experience with C++ programming. Solid background in linear algebra and analysis. Some knowledge of differential geometry, computational geometry and numerical methods is helpful but not a strict requirement.
252-0579-00L3D Vision Information W5 KP3G + 1AM. Pollefeys, V. Larsson
KurzbeschreibungThe course covers camera models and calibration, feature tracking and matching, camera motion estimation via simultaneous localization and mapping (SLAM) and visual odometry (VO), epipolar and mult-view geometry, structure-from-motion, (multi-view) stereo, augmented reality, and image-based (re-)localization.
LernzielAfter attending this course, students will:
1. understand the core concepts for recovering 3D shape of objects and scenes from images and video.
2. be able to implement basic systems for vision-based robotics and simple virtual/augmented reality applications.
3. have a good overview over the current state-of-the art in 3D vision.
4. be able to critically analyze and asses current research in this area.
InhaltThe goal of this course is to teach the core techniques required for robotic and augmented reality applications: How to determine the motion of a camera and how to estimate the absolute position and orientation of a camera in the real world. This course will introduce the basic concepts of 3D Vision in the form of short lectures, followed by student presentations discussing the current state-of-the-art. The main focus of this course are student projects on 3D Vision topics, with an emphasis on robotic vision and virtual and augmented reality applications.
252-3005-00LNatural Language Understanding Information
Findet dieses Semester nicht statt.
Findet im HS20 wieder statt.
W5 KP2V + 1U + 1ANoch nicht bekannt
KurzbeschreibungThis course presents topics in natural language processing with an emphasis on modern techniques, primarily focusing on statistical and deep learning approaches. The course provides an overview of the primary areas of research in language processing as well as a detailed exploration of the models and techniques used both in research and in commercial natural language systems.
LernzielThe objective of the course is to learn the basic concepts in the statistical processing of natural languages. The course will be project-oriented so that the students can also gain hands-on experience with state-of-the-art tools and techniques.
InhaltThis course presents an introduction to general topics and techniques used in natural language processing today, primarily focusing on statistical approaches. The course provides an overview of the primary areas of research in language processing as well as a detailed exploration of the models and techniques used both in research and in commercial natural language systems.
LiteraturLectures will make use of textbooks such as the one by Jurafsky and Martin where appropriate, but will also make use of original research and survey papers.
261-5130-00LResearch in Data Science Belegung eingeschränkt - Details anzeigen
Only for Data Science MSc.
W6 KP13AProfessor/innen
KurzbeschreibungIndependent work under the supervision of a core or adjunct faculty of data science.
LernzielIndependent work under the supervision of a core or adjunct faculty of data science.
An approval of the director of studies is required for a non DS professor.
InhaltProject done under supervision of an approved professor.
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesOnly students who have passed at least one core course in Data Management and Processing, and one core course in Data Analysis can start with a research project.

A project description must be submitted at the start of the project to the studies administration.
263-0007-00LAdvanced Systems Lab Information Belegung eingeschränkt - Details anzeigen
Only for master students, otherwise a special permission by the study administration of D-INFK is required.
W8 KP3V + 2U + 2AM. Püschel, C. Zhang
KurzbeschreibungThis course introduces the student to the foundations and state-of-the-art techniques in developing high performance software for mathematical functionality occurring in various fields in computer science. The focus is on optimizing for a single core and includes optimizing for the memory hierarchy, for special instruction sets, and the possible use of automatic performance tuning.
LernzielSoftware performance (i.e., runtime) arises through the complex interaction of algorithm, its implementation, the compiler used, and the microarchitecture the program is run on. The first goal of the course is to provide the student with an understanding of this "vertical" interaction, and hence software performance, for mathematical functionality. The second goal is to teach a systematic strategy how to use this knowledge to write fast software for numerical problems. This strategy will be trained in several homeworks and a semester-long group project.
InhaltThe fast evolution and increasing complexity of computing platforms pose a major challenge for developers of high performance software for engineering, science, and consumer applications: it becomes increasingly harder to harness the available computing power. Straightforward implementations may lose as much as one or two orders of magnitude in performance. On the other hand, creating optimal implementations requires the developer to have an understanding of algorithms, capabilities and limitations of compilers, and the target platform's architecture and microarchitecture.

This interdisciplinary course introduces the student to the foundations and state-of-the-art techniques in high performance mathematical software development using important functionality such as matrix operations, transforms, filters, and others as examples. The course will explain how to optimize for the memory hierarchy, take advantage of special instruction sets, and other details of current processors that require optimization. The concept of automatic performance tuning is introduced. The focus is on optimization for a single core; thus, the course complements others on parallel and distributed computing.

Finally a general strategy for performance analysis and optimization is introduced that the students will apply in group projects that accompany the course.
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesSolid knowledge of the C programming language and matrix algebra.
263-0008-00LComputational Intelligence Lab
Only for master students, otherwise a special permission by the study administration of D-INFK is required.
W8 KP2V + 2U + 3AT. Hofmann
KurzbeschreibungThis laboratory course teaches fundamental concepts in computational science and machine learning with a special emphasis on matrix factorization and representation learning. The class covers techniques like dimension reduction, data clustering, sparse coding, and deep learning as well as a wide spectrum of related use cases and applications.
LernzielStudents acquire fundamental theoretical concepts and methodologies from machine learning and how to apply these techniques to build intelligent systems that solve real-world problems. They learn to successfully develop solutions to application problems by following the key steps of modeling, algorithm design, implementation and experimental validation.

This lab course has a strong focus on practical assignments. Students work in groups of three to four people, to develop solutions to three application problems: 1. Collaborative filtering and recommender systems, 2. Text sentiment classification, and 3. Road segmentation in aerial imagery.

For each of these problems, students submit their solutions to an online evaluation and ranking system, and get feedback in terms of numerical accuracy and computational speed. In the final part of the course, students combine and extend one of their previous promising solutions, and write up their findings in an extended abstract in the style of a conference paper.

(Disclaimer: The offered projects may be subject to change from year to year.)
Inhaltsee course description
263-2925-00LProgram Analysis for System Security and Reliability Information W6 KP2V + 1U + 2AP. Tsankov
KurzbeschreibungSecurity issues in modern systems (blockchains, datacenters, AI) result in billions of losses due to hacks. This course introduces the security issues in modern systems and state-of-the-art automated techniques for building secure and reliable systems. The course has a practical focus and covers systems built by successful ETH spin-offs.
Lernziel* Learn about security issues in modern systems -- blockchains, smart contracts, AI-based systems (e.g., autonomous cars), data centers -- and why they are challenging to address.

* Understand how the latest automated analysis techniques work, both discrete and probabilistic.

* Understand how these techniques combine with machine-learning methods, both supervised and unsupervised.

* Understand how to use these methods to build reliable and secure modern systems.

* Learn about new open problems that if solved can lead to research and commercial impact.
InhaltPart I: Security of Blockchains

- We will cover existing blockchains (e.g., Ethereum, Bitcoin), how they work, what the core security issues are, and how these have led to massive financial losses.
- We will show how to extract useful information about smart contracts and transactions using interactive analysis frameworks for querying blockchains (e.g. Google's Ethereum BigQuery).
- We will discuss the state-of-the-art security tools (e.g., https://securify.ch) for ensuring that smart contracts are free of security vulnerabilities.
- We will study the latest automated reasoning systems (e.g., https://verx.ch) for checking custom (temporal) properties of smart contracts and illustrate their operation on real-world use cases.
- We will study the underlying methods for automated reasoning and testing (e.g., abstract interpretation, symbolic execution, fuzzing) are used to build such tools.


Part II: Security of Datacenters and Networks

- We will show how to ensure that datacenters and ISPs are secured using declarative reasoning methods (e.g., Datalog). We will also see how to automatically synthesize secure configurations (e.g. using SyNET and NetComplete) which lead to desirable behaviors, thus automating the job of the network operator and avoiding critical errors.
- We will discuss how to apply modern discrete probabilistic inference (e.g., PSI and Bayonet) so to reason about probabilistic network properties (e.g., the probability of a packet reaching a destination if links fail).


Part III: Machine Learning for Security

- We will discuss how machine learning models for structured prediction are used to address security tasks, including de-obfuscation of binaries (Debin: https://debin.ai), Android APKs (DeGuard: http://apk-deguard.com) and JavaScript (JSNice: http://jsnice.org).
- We will study to leverage program abstractions in combination with clustering techniques to learn security rules for cryptography APIs from large codebases.
- We will study how to automatically learn to identify security vulnerabilities related to the handling of untrusted inputs (cross-Site scripting, SQL injection, path traversal, remote code execution) from large codebases.


To gain a deeper understanding, the course will involve a hands-on programming project where the methods studied in the class will be applied.
263-3710-00LMachine Perception Information Belegung eingeschränkt - Details anzeigen
Number of participants limited to 200.
W5 KP2V + 1U + 1AO. Hilliges
KurzbeschreibungRecent developments in neural networks (aka “deep learning”) have drastically advanced the performance of machine perception systems in a variety of areas including computer vision, robotics, and intelligent UIs. This course is a deep dive into deep learning algorithms and architectures with applications to a variety of perceptual tasks.
LernzielStudents will learn about fundamental aspects of modern deep learning approaches for perception. Students will learn to implement, train and debug their own neural networks and gain a detailed understanding of cutting-edge research in learning-based computer vision, robotics and HCI. The final project assignment will involve training a complex neural network architecture and applying it on a real-world dataset of human activity.

The core competency acquired through this course is a solid foundation in deep-learning algorithms to process and interpret human input into computing systems. In particular, students should be able to develop systems that deal with the problem of recognizing people in images, detecting and describing body parts, inferring their spatial configuration, performing action/gesture recognition from still images or image sequences, also considering multi-modal data, among others.
InhaltWe will focus on teaching: how to set up the problem of machine perception, the learning algorithms, network architectures and advanced deep learning concepts in particular probabilistic deep learning models

The course covers the following main areas:
I) Foundations of deep-learning.
II) Probabilistic deep-learning for generative modelling of data (latent variable models, generative adversarial networks and auto-regressive models).
III) Deep learning in computer vision, human-computer interaction and robotics.

Specific topics include: 
I) Deep learning basics:
a) Neural Networks and training (i.e., backpropagation)
b) Feedforward Networks
c) Timeseries modelling (RNN, GRU, LSTM)
d) Convolutional Neural Networks for classification
II) Probabilistic Deep Learning:
a) Latent variable models (VAEs)
b) Generative adversarial networks (GANs)
c) Autoregressive models (PixelCNN, PixelRNN, TCNs)
III) Deep Learning techniques for machine perception:
a) Fully Convolutional architectures for dense per-pixel tasks (i.e., instance segmentation)
b) Pose estimation and other tasks involving human activity
c) Deep reinforcement learning
IV) Case studies from research in computer vision, HCI, robotics and signal processing
LiteraturDeep Learning
Book by Ian Goodfellow and Yoshua Bengio
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesThis is an advanced grad-level course that requires a background in machine learning. Students are expected to have a solid mathematical foundation, in particular in linear algebra, multivariate calculus, and probability. The course will focus on state-of-the-art research in deep-learning and will not repeat basics of machine learning

Please take note of the following conditions:
1) The number of participants is limited to 200 students (MSc and PhDs).
2) Students must have taken the exam in Machine Learning (252-0535-00) or have acquired equivalent knowledge
3) All practical exercises will require basic knowledge of Python and will use libraries such as TensorFlow, scikit-learn and scikit-image. We will provide introductions to TensorFlow and other libraries that are needed but will not provide introductions to basic programming or Python.

The following courses are strongly recommended as prerequisite:
* "Visual Computing" or "Computer Vision"

The course will be assessed by a final written examination in English. No course materials or electronic devices can be used during the examination. Note that the examination will be based on the contents of the lectures, the associated reading materials and the exercises.
263-4400-00LAdvanced Graph Algorithms and Optimization Information Belegung eingeschränkt - Details anzeigen
Number of participants limited to 30.
W5 KP3G + 1AR. Kyng
KurzbeschreibungThis course will cover a number of advanced topics in optimization and graph algorithms.
LernzielThe course will take students on a deep dive into modern approaches to
graph algorithms using convex optimization techniques.

By studying convex optimization through the lens of graph algorithms,
students should develop a deeper understanding of fundamental
phenomena in optimization.

The course will cover some traditional discrete approaches to various graph
problems, especially flow problems, and then contrast these approaches
with modern, asymptotically faster methods based on combining convex
optimization with spectral and combinatorial graph theory.
InhaltStudents should leave the course understanding key
concepts in optimization such as first and second-order optimization,
convex duality, multiplicative weights and dual-based methods,
acceleration, preconditioning, and non-Euclidean optimization.

Students will also be familiarized with central techniques in the
development of graph algorithms in the past 15 years, including graph
decomposition techniques, sparsification, oblivious routing, and
spectral and combinatorial preconditioning.
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesThis course is targeted toward masters and doctoral students with an
interest in theoretical computer science.

Students should be comfortable with design and analysis of algorithms, probability, and linear algebra.

Having passed the course Algorithms, Probability, and Computing (APC) is highly recommended, but not formally required. If you are not
sure whether you're ready for this class or not, please consult the
instructor.
263-5300-00LGuarantees for Machine Learning Information Belegung eingeschränkt - Details anzeigen W5 KP2V + 2AF. Yang
KurzbeschreibungThis course teaches classical and recent methods in statistics and optimization commonly used to prove theoretical guarantees for machine learning algorithms. The knowledge is then applied in project work that focuses on understanding phenomena in modern machine learning.
LernzielThis course is aimed at advanced master and doctorate students who want to understand and/or conduct independent research on theory for modern machine learning. For this purpose, students will learn common mathematical techniques from statistical learning theory. In independent project work, they then apply their knowledge and go through the process of critically questioning recently published work, finding relevant research questions and learning how to effectively present research ideas to a professional audience.
InhaltThis course teaches some classical and recent methods in statistical learning theory aimed at proving theoretical guarantees for machine learning algorithms, including topics in

- concentration bounds, uniform convergence
- high-dimensional statistics (e.g. Lasso)
- prediction error bounds for non-parametric statistics (e.g. in kernel spaces)
- minimax lower bounds
- regularization via optimization

The project work focuses on active theoretical ML research that aims to understand modern phenomena in machine learning, including but not limited to

- how overparameterization could help generalization ( interpolating models, linearized NN )
- how overparameterization could help optimization ( non-convex optimization, loss landscape )
- complexity measures and approximation theoretic properties of randomly initialized and
trained NN
- generalization of robust learning ( adversarial robustness, standard and robust error tradeoff )
- prediction with calibrated confidence ( conformal prediction, calibration )
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesIt’s absolutely necessary for students to have a strong mathematical background (basic real analysis, probability theory, linear algebra) and good knowledge of core concepts in machine learning taught in courses such as “Introduction to Machine Learning”, “Regression”/ “Statistical Modelling”. It's also helpful to have heard an optimization course or approximation theoretic course. In addition to these prerequisites, this class requires a certain degree of mathematical maturity—including abstract thinking and the ability to understand and write proofs.
401-0674-00LNumerical Methods for Partial Differential Equations
Nicht für Studierende BSc/MSc Mathematik
W10 KP2G + 2U + 2P + 4AR. Hiptmair
KurzbeschreibungDerivation, properties, and implementation of fundamental numerical methods for a few key partial differential equations: convection-diffusion, heat equation, wave equation, conservation laws. Implementation in C++ based on a finite element library.
LernzielMain skills to be acquired in this course:
* Ability to implement fundamental numerical methods for the solution of partial differential equations efficiently.
* Ability to modify and adapt numerical algorithms guided by awareness of their mathematical foundations.
* Ability to select and assess numerical methods in light of the predictions of theory
* Ability to identify features of a PDE (= partial differential equation) based model that are relevant for the selection and performance of a numerical algorithm.
* Ability to understand research publications on theoretical and practical aspects of numerical methods for partial differential equations.
* Skills in the efficient implementation of finite element methods on unstructured meshes.

This course is neither a course on the mathematical foundations and numerical analysis of methods nor an course that merely teaches recipes and how to apply software packages.
Inhalt1 Second-Order Scalar Elliptic Boundary Value Problems
1.2 Equilibrium Models: Examples
1.3 Sobolev spaces
1.4 Linear Variational Problems
1.5 Equilibrium Models: Boundary Value Problems
1.6 Diffusion Models (Stationary Heat Conduction)
1.7 Boundary Conditions
1.8 Second-Order Elliptic Variational Problems
1.9 Essential and Natural Boundary Conditions
2 Finite Element Methods (FEM)
2.2 Principles of Galerkin Discretization
2.3 Case Study: Linear FEM for Two-Point Boundary Value Problems
2.4 Case Study: Triangular Linear FEM in Two Dimensions
2.5 Building Blocks of General Finite Element Methods
2.6 Lagrangian Finite Element Methods
2.7 Implementation of Finite Element Methods
2.7.1 Mesh Generation and Mesh File Format
2.7.2 Mesh Information and Mesh Data Structures
2.7.2.1 L EHR FEM++ Mesh: Container Layer
2.7.2.2 L EHR FEM++ Mesh: Topology Layer
2.7.2.3 L EHR FEM++ Mesh: Geometry Layer
2.7.3 Vectors and Matrices
2.7.4 Assembly Algorithms
2.7.4.1 Assembly: Localization
2.7.4.2 Assembly: Index Mappings
2.7.4.3 Distribute Assembly Schemes
2.7.4.4 Assembly: Linear Algebra Perspective
2.7.5 Local Computations
2.7.5.1 Analytic Formulas for Entries of Element Matrices
2.7.5.2 Local Quadrature
2.7.6 Treatment of Essential Boundary Conditions
2.8 Parametric Finite Element Methods
3 FEM: Convergence and Accuracy
3.1 Abstract Galerkin Error Estimates
3.2 Empirical (Asymptotic) Convergence of Lagrangian FEM
3.3 A Priori (Asymptotic) Finite Element Error Estimates
3.4 Elliptic Regularity Theory
3.5 Variational Crimes
3.6 FEM: Duality Techniques for Error Estimation
3.7 Discrete Maximum Principle
3.8 Validation and Debugging of Finite Element Codes
4 Beyond FEM: Alternative Discretizations [dropped]
5 Non-Linear Elliptic Boundary Value Problems [dropped]
6 Second-Order Linear Evolution Problems
6.1 Time-Dependent Boundary Value Problems
6.2 Parabolic Initial-Boundary Value Problems
6.3 Linear Wave Equations
7 Convection-Diffusion Problems [dropped]
8 Numerical Methods for Conservation Laws
8.1 Conservation Laws: Examples
8.2 Scalar Conservation Laws in 1D
8.3 Conservative Finite Volume (FV) Discretization
8.4 Timestepping for Finite-Volume Methods
8.5 Higher-Order Conservative Finite-Volume Schemes
SkriptThe lecture will be taught in flipped classroom format:
- Video tutorials for all thematic units will be published online.
- Tablet notes accompanying the videos will be made available to the audience as PDF.
- A comprehensive lecture document will cover all aspects of the course.
LiteraturChapters of the following books provide supplementary reading
(detailed references in course material):

* D. Braess: Finite Elemente,
Theorie, schnelle Löser und Anwendungen in der Elastizitätstheorie, Springer 2007 (available online).
* S. Brenner and R. Scott. Mathematical theory of finite element methods, Springer 2008 (available online).
* A. Ern and J.-L. Guermond. Theory and Practice of Finite Elements, volume 159 of Applied Mathematical Sciences. Springer, New York, 2004.
* Ch. Großmann and H.-G. Roos: Numerical Treatment of Partial Differential Equations, Springer 2007.
* W. Hackbusch. Elliptic Differential Equations. Theory and Numerical Treatment, volume 18 of Springer Series in Computational Mathematics. Springer, Berlin, 1992.
* P. Knabner and L. Angermann. Numerical Methods for Elliptic and Parabolic Partial Differential Equations, volume 44 of Texts in Applied Mathematics. Springer, Heidelberg, 2003.
* S. Larsson and V. Thomée. Partial Differential Equations with Numerical Methods, volume 45 of Texts in Applied Mathematics. Springer, Heidelberg, 2003.
* R. LeVeque. Finite Volume Methods for Hyperbolic Problems. Cambridge Texts in Applied Mathematics. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, UK, 2002.

However, study of supplementary literature is not important for for following the course.
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesMastery of basic calculus and linear algebra is taken for granted.
Familiarity with fundamental numerical methods (solution methods for linear systems of equations, interpolation, approximation, numerical quadrature, numerical integration of ODEs) is essential.

Important: Coding skills and experience in C++ are essential.

Homework assignments involve substantial coding, partly based on a C++ finite element library. The written examination will be computer based and will comprise coding tasks.
401-3052-05LGraph Theory Information W5 KP2V + 1UB. Sudakov
KurzbeschreibungBasic notions, trees, spanning trees, Caley's formula, vertex and edge connectivity, 2-connectivity, Mader's theorem, Menger's theorem, Eulerian graphs, Hamilton cycles, Dirac's theorem, matchings, theorems of Hall, König and Tutte, planar graphs, Euler's formula, basic non-planar graphs, graph colorings, greedy colorings, Brooks' theorem, 5-colorings of planar graphs
LernzielThe students will get an overview over the most fundamental questions concerning graph theory. We expect them to understand the proof techniques and to use them autonomously on related problems.
SkriptLecture will be only at the blackboard.
LiteraturWest, D.: "Introduction to Graph Theory"
Diestel, R.: "Graph Theory"

Further literature links will be provided in the lecture.
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesStudents are expected to have a mathematical background and should be able to write rigorous proofs.


NOTICE: This course unit was previously offered as 252-1408-00L Graphs and Algorithms.
401-3052-10LGraph Theory Information W10 KP4V + 1UB. Sudakov
KurzbeschreibungBasics, trees, Caley's formula, matrix tree theorem, connectivity, theorems of Mader and Menger, Eulerian graphs, Hamilton cycles, theorems of Dirac, Ore, Erdös-Chvatal, matchings, theorems of Hall, König, Tutte, planar graphs, Euler's formula, Kuratowski's theorem, graph colorings, Brooks' theorem, 5-colorings of planar graphs, list colorings, Vizing's theorem, Ramsey theory, Turán's theorem
LernzielThe students will get an overview over the most fundamental questions concerning graph theory. We expect them to understand the proof techniques and to use them autonomously on related problems.
SkriptLecture will be only at the blackboard.
LiteraturWest, D.: "Introduction to Graph Theory"
Diestel, R.: "Graph Theory"

Further literature links will be provided in the lecture.
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesStudents are expected to have a mathematical background and should be able to write rigorous proofs.
401-3602-00LApplied Stochastic Processes Information
Findet dieses Semester nicht statt.
W8 KP3V + 1Ukeine Angaben
KurzbeschreibungPoisson-Prozesse; Erneuerungsprozesse; Markovketten in diskreter und in stetiger Zeit; einige Beispiele und Anwendungen.
LernzielStochastische Prozesse dienen zur Beschreibung der Entwicklung von Systemen, die sich in einer zufälligen Weise entwickeln. In dieser Vorlesung bezieht sich die Entwicklung auf einen skalaren Parameter, der als Zeit interpretiert wird, so dass wir die zeitliche Entwicklung des Systems studieren. Die Vorlesung präsentiert mehrere Klassen von stochastischen Prozessen, untersucht ihre Eigenschaften und ihr Verhalten und zeigt anhand von einigen Beispielen, wie diese Prozesse eingesetzt werden können. Die Hauptbetonung liegt auf der Theorie; "applied" ist also im Sinne von "applicable" zu verstehen.
LiteraturR. N. Bhattacharya and E. C. Waymire, "Stochastic Processes with Applications", SIAM (2009), available online: http://epubs.siam.org/doi/book/10.1137/1.9780898718997
R. Durrett, "Essentials of Stochastic Processes", Springer (2012), available online: http://link.springer.com/book/10.1007/978-1-4614-3615-7/page/1
M. Lefebvre, "Applied Stochastic Processes", Springer (2007), available online: http://link.springer.com/book/10.1007/978-0-387-48976-6/page/1
S. I. Resnick, "Adventures in Stochastic Processes", Birkhäuser (2005)
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesPrerequisites are familiarity with (measure-theoretic) probability theory as it is treated in the course "Probability Theory" (401-3601-00L).
401-4632-15LCausality Information W4 KP2GC. Heinze-Deml
KurzbeschreibungIn statistics, we are used to search for the best predictors of some random variable. In many situations, however, we are interested in predicting a system's behavior under manipulations. For such an analysis, we require knowledge about the underlying causal structure of the system. In this course, we study concepts and theory behind causal inference.
LernzielAfter this course, you should be able to
- understand the language and concepts of causal inference
- know the assumptions under which one can infer causal relations from observational and/or interventional data
- describe and apply different methods for causal structure learning
- given data and a causal structure, derive causal effects and predictions of interventional experiments
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesPrerequisites: basic knowledge of probability theory and regression
401-4944-20LMathematics of Data ScienceW8 KP4GA. Bandeira
KurzbeschreibungMostly self-contained, but fast-paced, introductory masters level course on various theoretical aspects of algorithms that aim to extract information from data.
LernzielIntroduction to various mathematical aspects of Data Science.
InhaltThese topics lie in overlaps of (Applied) Mathematics with: Computer Science, Electrical Engineering, Statistics, and/or Operations Research. Each lecture will feature a couple of Mathematical Open Problem(s) related to Data Science. The main mathematical tools used will be Probability and Linear Algebra, and a basic familiarity with these subjects is required. There will also be some (although knowledge of these tools is not assumed) Graph Theory, Representation Theory, Applied Harmonic Analysis, among others. The topics treated will include Dimension reduction, Manifold learning, Sparse recovery, Random Matrices, Approximation Algorithms, Community detection in graphs, and several others.
Skripthttps://people.math.ethz.ch/~abandeira/TenLecturesFortyTwoProblems.pdf
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesThe main mathematical tools used will be Probability, Linear Algebra (and real analysis), and a working knowledge of these subjects is required. In addition
to these prerequisites, this class requires a certain degree of mathematical maturity--including abstract thinking and the ability to understand and write proofs.


We encourage students who are interested in mathematical data science to take both this course and ``227-0434-10L Mathematics of Information'' taught by Prof. H. Bölcskei. The two courses are designed to be
complementary.
A. Bandeira and H. Bölcskei
401-6102-00LMultivariate Statistics
Findet dieses Semester nicht statt.
W4 KP2Gkeine Angaben
KurzbeschreibungMultivariate Statistics deals with joint distributions of several random variables. This course introduces the basic concepts and provides an overview over classical and modern methods of multivariate statistics. We will consider the theory behind the methods as well as their applications.
LernzielAfter the course, you should be able to:
- describe the various methods and the concepts and theory behind them
- identify adequate methods for a given statistical problem
- use the statistical software "R" to efficiently apply these methods
- interpret the output of these methods
InhaltVisualization / Principal component analysis / Multidimensional scaling / The multivariate Normal distribution / Factor analysis / Supervised learning / Cluster analysis
SkriptNone
LiteraturThe course will be based on class notes and books that are available electronically via the ETH library.
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesTarget audience: This course is the more theoretical version of "Applied Multivariate Statistics" (401-0102-00L) and is targeted at students with a math background.

Prerequisite: A basic course in probability and statistics.

Note: The courses 401-0102-00L and 401-6102-00L are mutually exclusive. You may register for at most one of these two course units.
402-0448-01LQuantum Information Processing I: Concepts
Dieser theoretisch ausgerichtete Teil QIP I bildet zusammen mit dem experimentell ausgerichteten Teil 402-0448-02L QIP II, die beide im Frühjahrssemester angeboten werden, im Master-Studiengang Physik das experimentelle Kernfach "Quantum Information Processing" mit total 10 ECTS-Kreditpunkten.
W5 KP2V + 1UP. Kammerlander
KurzbeschreibungThe course will cover the key concepts and ideas of quantum information processing, including descriptions of quantum algorithms which give the quantum computer the power to compute problems outside the reach of any classical supercomputer.
Key concepts such as quantum error correction will be described. These ideas provide fundamental insights into the nature of quantum states and measurement.
LernzielWe aim to provide an overview of the central concepts in Quantum Information Processing, including insights into the advantages to be gained from using quantum mechanics and the range of techniques based on quantum error correction which enable the elimination of noise.
InhaltThe topics covered in the course will include quantum circuits, gate decomposition and universal sets of gates, efficiency of quantum circuits, quantum algorithms (Shor, Grover, Deutsch-Josza,..), error correction, fault-tolerant design, entanglement, teleportation and dense conding, teleportation of gates, and cryptography.
SkriptMore details to follow.
LiteraturQuantum Computation and Quantum Information
Michael Nielsen and Isaac Chuang
Cambridge University Press
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesBasic knowledge in the formalism of quantum states, unitary evolution and quantum measurement is recommended.
701-0104-00LStatistical Modelling of Spatial DataW3 KP2GA. J. Papritz
KurzbeschreibungIn environmental sciences one often deals with spatial data. When analysing such data the focus is either on exploring their structure (dependence on explanatory variables, autocorrelation) and/or on spatial prediction. The course provides an introduction to geostatistical methods that are useful for such analyses.
LernzielThe course will provide an overview of the basic concepts and stochastic models that are used to model spatial data. In addition, participants will learn a number of geostatistical techniques and acquire familiarity with R software that is useful for analyzing spatial data.
InhaltAfter an introductory discussion of the types of problems and the kind of data that arise in environmental research, an introduction into linear geostatistics (models: stationary and intrinsic random processes, modelling large-scale spatial patterns by linear regression, modelling autocorrelation by variogram; kriging: mean square prediction of spatial data) will be taught. The lectures will be complemented by data analyses that the participants have to do themselves.
SkriptSlides, descriptions of the problems for the data analyses and solutions to them will be provided.
LiteraturP.J. Diggle & P.J. Ribeiro Jr. 2007. Model-based Geostatistics. Springer.

Bivand, R. S., Pebesma, E. J. & Gómez-Rubio, V. 2013. Applied Spatial Data Analysis with R. Springer.
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesFamiliarity with linear regression analysis (e.g. equivalent to the first part of the course 401-0649-00L Applied Statistical Regression) and with the software R (e.g. 401-6215-00L Using R for Data Analysis and Graphics (Part I), 401-6217-00L Using R for Data Analysis and Graphics (Part II)) are required for attending the course.
Interdisziplinäre Wahlfächer
NummerTitelTypECTSUmfangDozierende
101-0478-00LMeasurement and Modelling of Travel BehaviourW6 KP4GK. W. Axhausen
KurzbeschreibungComprehensive introduction to survey methods in transport planning and modeling of travel behavior, using advanced discrete choice models.
LernzielEnabling the student to understand and apply the various measurement approaches and models of modelling travel behaviour.
InhaltBehavioral model and measurement; travel diary, design process, hypothetical markets, discrete choice model, parameter estimation, pattern of travel behaviour, market segments, simulation, advanced discrete choice models
SkriptVarious papers and notes are distributed during the course.
103-0228-00LMultimedia Cartography
Voraussetzung: Erfolgreicher Abschluss der Lerneinheit Cartography III (103-0227-00L).
W4 KP3GH.‑R. Bär, R. Sieber
KurzbeschreibungFocus of this course is on the realization of an atlas project in a small team. During the first part of the course, the necessary organizational, creative and technological basics will be provided. At the end of the course, the interactive atlas projects will be presented by the team members.
LernzielThe goal of this course is to provide the students the theoretical background, knowledge and practical skills necessary to plan, design and create an interactive Web atlas based on modern Web technologies.
InhaltThis course will cover the following topics:

- Web map design
- Project management
- Graphical user interfaces in Web atlases
- Interactions in map and atlas applications
- Web standards
- Programming interactive Web applications
- Use of software libraries
- Cartographic Web services
- Code repository
- Copyright and the Internet
SkriptLecture notes and additional material are available on Moodle.
Literatur- Cartwright, William; Peterson, Michael P. and Georg Gartner (2007); Multimedia Cartography, Springer, Heidelberg
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesPrerequisites: Successful completion of Cartography III (103-0227-00L).
Previous knowledge in Web programming.

The students are expected to
- present their work in progress on a regular basis
- present their atlas project at the end of the course
- keep records of all the work done
- document all individual contributions to the project
103-0247-00LMobile GIS and Location-Based ServicesW5 KP4GP. Kiefer
KurzbeschreibungThe course introduces students to the theoretical and technological background of mobile geographic information systems and location-based services. In lab sessions students acquire competences in mobile GIS design and implementation.
LernzielStudents will
- learn about the implications of mobility on GIS
- get a detailed overview on research fields related to mobile GIS
- get an overview on current mobile GIS and LBS technology, and learn how to assess new technologies in this fast-moving field
- achieve an integrated view of Geospatial Web Services and mobile GIS
- acquire competences in mobile GIS design and implementation
Inhalt- LBS and mobile GIS: architectures, market, applications, and application development
- Development for Android
- Introduction to augmented reality development (HoloLens)
- Mobile decision-making, context, personalization, and privacy
- Mobile human computer interaction and user interfaces
- Mobile behavior interpretation
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesElementary programming skills (Java)
103-0255-01LGeodatenanalyseW2 KP2GK. Kurzhals
KurzbeschreibungDie Lehrveranstaltung behandelt weiterführende Methoden der Geodatenanalyse.
Lernziel- Verstehen der theoretischen Grundlagen räumlicher Analyseverfahren.
- Verstehen und Anwenden von Methoden zur raumbezogenen Datenanalyse.
- Erkennen häufiger Fehlerquellen bei der Geodatenanalyse.
- Vertiefende praktische Kenntnisse in der Anwendung entsprechender GIS-Tools.
- Erlernen der Fähigkeit, raumbezogene Probleme jenseits klassischer GIS Software zu lösen.
InhaltIn der Lehrveranstaltung werden weiterführende Methoden räumlicher Analyseverfahren theoretisch behandelt sowie anhand von Übungsaufgaben angewendet.
Skriptkein Skript.
LiteraturEine Literaturliste wird in der Lehrveranstaltung zur Verfügung gestellt.
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesVoraussetzungen:
Basiswissen im Bereich der Geoinformationstechnologien und der Verwendung von Geoinformationssystemen entsprechend den Vorlesungen GIS I und GIS II im Bachelor-Studiengang Geomatik und Planung.
227-0945-10LCell and Molecular Biology for Engineers II
This course is part II of a two-semester course.
Knowledge of part I is required.
W3 KP2GC. Frei
KurzbeschreibungThe course gives an introduction into cellular and molecular biology, specifically for students with a background in engineering. The focus will be on the basic organization of eukaryotic cells, molecular mechanisms and cellular functions. Textbook knowledge will be combined with results from recent research and technological innovations in biology.
LernzielAfter completing this course, engineering students will be able to apply their previous training in the quantitative and physical sciences to modern biology. Students will also learn the principles how biological models are established, and how these models can be tested.
InhaltLectures will include the following topics: DNA, chromosomes, RNA, protein, genetics, gene expression, membrane structure and function, vesicular traffic, cellular communication, energy conversion, cytoskeleton, cell cycle, cellular growth, apoptosis, autophagy, cancer, development and stem cells.

In addition, 4 journal clubs will be held, where recent publications will be discussed (2 journal clubs in part I and 2 journal clubs in part II). For each journal club, students (alone or in groups of up to three students) have to write a summary and discussion of the publication. These written documents will be graded and count as 40% for the final grade.
SkriptScripts of all lectures will be available.
Literatur"Molecular Biology of the Cell" (6th edition) by Alberts, Johnson, Lewis, Morgan, Raff, Roberts, and Walter.
227-0391-00LMedical Image Analysis
Basic knowledge of computer vision would be helpful.
W3 KP2GE. Konukoglu, M. A. Reyes Aguirre
KurzbeschreibungIt is the objective of this lecture to introduce the basic concepts used
in Medical Image Analysis. In particular the lecture focuses on shape
representation schemes, segmentation techniques, machine learning based predictive models and various image registration methods commonly used in Medical Image Analysis applications.
LernzielThis lecture aims to give an overview of the basic concepts of Medical Image Analysis and its application areas.
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesPrerequisites:
Basic concepts of mathematical analysis and linear algebra.

Preferred:
Basic knowledge of computer vision and machine learning would be helpful.

The course will be held in English.
261-5113-00LComputational Challenges in Medical Genomics Information Belegung eingeschränkt - Details anzeigen
Number of participants limited to 20.
W2 KP2SA. Kahles, G. Rätsch
KurzbeschreibungThis seminar discusses recent relevant contributions to the fields of computational genomics, algorithmic bioinformatics, statistical genetics and related areas. Each participant will hold a presentation and lead the subsequent discussion.
LernzielPreparing and holding a scientific presentation in front of peers is a central part of working in the scientific domain. In this seminar, the participants will learn how to efficiently summarize the relevant parts of a scientific publication, critically reflect its contents, and summarize it for presentation to an audience. The necessary skills to succesfully present the key points of existing research work are the same as needed to communicate own research ideas.
In addition to holding a presentation, each student will both contribute to as well as lead a discussion section on the topics presented in the class.
InhaltThe topics covered in the seminar are related to recent computational challenges that arise from the fields of genomics and biomedicine, including but not limited to genomic variant interpretation, genomic sequence analysis, compressive genomics tasks, single-cell approaches, privacy considerations, statistical frameworks, etc.
Both recently published works contributing novel ideas to the areas mentioned above as well as seminal contributions from the past are amongst the list of selected papers.
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesKnowledge of algorithms and data structures and interest in applications in genomics and computational biomedicine.
261-5120-00LMachine Learning for Health Care Information Belegung eingeschränkt - Details anzeigen
Number of participants limited to 150.
W5 KP3P + 1AG. Rätsch, J. Vogt, V. Boeva
KurzbeschreibungThe course will review the most relevant methods and applications of Machine Learning in Biomedicine, discuss the main challenges they present and their current technical problems.
LernzielDuring the last years, we have observed a rapid growth in the field of Machine Learning (ML), mainly due to improvements in ML algorithms, the increase of data availability and a reduction in computing costs. This growth is having a profound impact in biomedical applications, where the great variety of tasks and data types enables us to get benefit of ML algorithms in many different ways. In this course we will review the most relevant methods and applications of ML in biomedicine, discuss the main challenges they present and their current technical solutions.
InhaltThe course will consist of four topic clusters that will cover the most relevant applications of ML in Biomedicine:
1) Structured time series: Temporal time series of structured data often appear in biomedical datasets, presenting challenges as containing variables with different periodicities, being conditioned by static data, etc.
2) Medical notes: Vast amount of medical observations are stored in the form of free text, we will analyze stategies for extracting knowledge from them.
3) Medical images: Images are a fundamental piece of information in many medical disciplines. We will study how to train ML algorithms with them.
4) Genomics data: ML in genomics is still an emerging subfield, but given that genomics data are arguably the most extensive and complex datasets that can be found in biomedicine, it is expected that many relevant ML applications will arise in the near future. We will review and discuss current applications and challenges.
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesData Structures & Algorithms, Introduction to Machine Learning, Statistics/Probability, Programming in Python, Unix Command Line

Relation to Course 261-5100-00 Computational Biomedicine: This course is a continuation of the previous course with new topics related to medical data and machine learning. The format of Computational Biomedicine II will also be different. It is helpful but not essential to attend Computational Biomedicine before attending Computational Biomedicine II.
262-0200-00LBayesian PhylodynamicsW4 KP2G + 2AT. Stadler, T. Vaughan
KurzbeschreibungHow fast was Ebola spreading in West Africa? Where and when did the epidemic outbreak start? How can we construct the phylogenetic tree of great apes, and did gene flow occur between different apes? At the end of the course, students will have designed, performed, presented, and discussed their own phylodynamic data analysis to answer such questions.
LernzielAttendees will extend their knowledge of Bayesian phylodynamics obtained in the “Computational Biology” class (636-0017-00L) and will learn how to apply this theory to real world data. The main theoretical concepts introduced are:
* Bayesian statistics
* Phylogenetic and phylodynamic models
* Markov Chain Monte Carlo methods
Attendees will apply these concepts to a number of applications yielding biological insight into:
* Epidemiology
* Pathogen evolution
* Macroevolution of species
InhaltIn the first part of the semester, in each week, we will first present the theoretical concepts of Bayesian phylodynamics. The presentation will be followed by attendees using the software package BEAST v2 to apply these theoretical concepts to empirical data. We use previously published datasets on e.g. Ebola, Zika, Yellow Fever, Apes, and Penguins for analysis. Examples of these practical tutorials are available on https://taming-the-beast.org/.
In the second part of the semester, the students choose an empirical dataset of genetic sequencing data and possibly some non-genetic metadata. They then design and conduct a research project in which they perform Bayesian phylogenetic analyses of their dataset. The weekly class is intended to discuss and monitor progress and to address students’ questions very interactively. At the end of the semester, the students present their research project in an oral presentation. The content of the presentation, the style of the presentation, and the performance in answering the questions after the presentation will be marked.
SkriptLecture slides will be available on moodle.
LiteraturThe following books provide excellent background material:
• Drummond, A. & Bouckaert, R. 2015. Bayesian evolutionary analysis with BEAST.
• Yang, Z. 2014. Molecular Evolution: A Statistical Approach.
• Felsenstein, J. 2003. Inferring Phylogenies.
The tutorials in this course are based on our Summer School “Taming the BEAST”: https://taming-the-beast.org/
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesThis class builds upon the content which we teach in the Computational Biology class (636-0017-00L). Attendees must have either taken the Computational Biology class or acquired the content elsewhere.
636-0702-00LStatistical Models in Computational BiologyW6 KP2V + 1U + 2AN. Beerenwinkel
KurzbeschreibungThe course offers an introduction to graphical models and their application to complex biological systems. Graphical models combine a statistical methodology with efficient algorithms for inference in settings of high dimension and uncertainty. The unifying graphical model framework is developed and used to examine several classical and topical computational biology methods.
LernzielThe goal of this course is to establish the common language of graphical models for applications in computational biology and to see this methodology at work for several real-world data sets.
InhaltGraphical models are a marriage between probability theory and graph theory. They combine the notion of probabilities with efficient algorithms for inference among many random variables. Graphical models play an important role in computational biology, because they explicitly address two features that are inherent to biological systems: complexity and uncertainty. We will develop the basic theory and the common underlying formalism of graphical models and discuss several computational biology applications. Topics covered include conditional independence, Bayesian networks, Markov random fields, Gaussian graphical models, EM algorithm, junction tree algorithm, model selection, Dirichlet process mixture, causality, the pair hidden Markov model for sequence alignment, probabilistic phylogenetic models, phylo-HMMs, microarray experiments and gene regulatory networks, protein interaction networks, learning from perturbation experiments, time series data and dynamic Bayesian networks. Some of the biological applications will be explored in small data analysis problems as part of the exercises.
Skriptno
Literatur- Airoldi EM (2007) Getting started in probabilistic graphical models. PLoS Comput Biol 3(12): e252. doi:10.1371/journal.pcbi.0030252
- Bishop CM. Pattern Recognition and Machine Learning. Springer, 2007.
- Durbin R, Eddy S, Krogh A, Mitchinson G. Biological Sequence Analysis. Cambridge university Press, 2004
263-3501-00LFuture Internet Information W6 KP1V + 1U + 3AA. Singla
KurzbeschreibungThis course will discuss recent advances in networking, with a focus on the Internet, with topics ranging from the algorithmic design of applications like video streaming to the likely near-future of satellite-based networking.
LernzielThe goals of the course are to build on basic undergraduate-level networking, and provide an understanding of the tradeoffs and existing technology in the design of large, complex networked systems, together with concrete experience of the challenges through a series of lab exercises.
InhaltThe focus of the course is on principles, architectures, protocols, and applications used in modern networked systems. Example topics include:

- How video streaming services like Netflix work, and research on improving their performance.
- How Web browsing could be made faster
- How the Internet's protocols are improving
- Exciting developments in satellite-based networking (ala SpaceX)
- The role of data centers in powering Internet services

A series of programming assignments will form a substantial part of the course grade.
SkriptLecture slides will be made available at the course Web site: https://ndal.ethz.ch/courses/fi.html
LiteraturNo textbook is required, but there will be regularly assigned readings from research literature, liked to the course Web site: https://ndal.ethz.ch/courses/fi.html.
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesAn undergraduate class covering the basics of networking, such as Internet routing and TCP. At ETH, Computer Networks (252-0064-00L) and Communication Networks (227-0120-00L) suffice. Similar courses from other universities are acceptable too.
261-5111-00LAsset Management: Advanced Investments (University of Zurich)
Der Kurs muss direkt an der UZH belegt werden.
UZH Modulkürzel: MFOEC207

Beachten Sie die Einschreibungstermine an der UZH: http://www.uzh.ch/studies/application/mobilitaet.html
W3 KP2VUni-Dozierende
KurzbeschreibungComprehension and application of advanced portfolio theory
LernzielComprehension and application of advanced portfolio theory
InhaltThe theoretical part of the lecture consists of the topics listed below.

- Standard Markowitz Model and Extensions MV Optimization, MV with Liabilities and CAPM.
- The Crux with MV
Resampling, regression, Black-Litterman, Bayesian, shrinkage, constrained and robust optimization.
- Downside and Coherent Risk Measures
Definition of risk measures, MV optimization under VaR and ES constraints.
- Risk Budgeting
Equal risk contribution, most diversified portfolio and other concentration indices
- Regime Switching and Asset Allocation
An introduction to regime switching models and its intuition.
- Strategic Asset Allocation
Introducing a continuous-time framework, solving the HJB equation and the classical Merton problem.
363-1000-00LFinancial EconomicsW3 KP2VA. Bommier
KurzbeschreibungThis is a theoretical course on the economics of financial decision making, at the crossroads between Microeconomics and Finance. It discusses portfolio choice theory, risk sharing, market equilibrium and asset pricing.
LernzielThe objective is to make students familiar with the economics of financial decision making and develop their intuition regarding the determination of asset prices, the notions of optimal risk sharing. However this is not a practical formation for traders. Moreover, the lecture doesn't cover topics such as market irrationality or systemic risk.

After completing this course:
1. Students will be familiar with the economics of financial decision making and develop their intuition regarding the determination of asset prices;
2. Students will understand the intuition of market equilibrium. They will be able to solve the market equilibrium in a simple model and derive the prices of assets.
3. Students will be familiar with the representation of attitudes towards risk. They will be able to explain how risk, wealth and agents’ preferences affect the demand for assets.
4. Students will understand the notion of risk diversification.
5. Students will understand the notion of optimal risk sharing.
InhaltThe following topics will be discussed:
1. Introduction to financial assets: The first lecture provides an overview of most common financial assets. We will also discuss the formation of asset prices and the role of markets in the valuation of these assets.

2. Option valuation: this lecture focuses on options, which are a certain type of financial asset. You will learn about arbitrage, which is a key notion to understand the valuation of options. This lecture will give you the intuition of the mechanisms underlying the pricing of assets in more general settings.

3. Introduction to the economic analysis of asset markets: this chapter will familiarize you with the notion of market equilibrium and the role it plays concerning asset pricing. Relying on economic theory, we will consider the properties of the market equilibrium: In which cases does the equilibrium exist? Is it optimal? How does it depend on individual’s wealth and preferences? The concepts defined in this chapter are essential to understand the following parts of the course.

4. A simplified approach to asset markets: based on the notions introduced in the previous lectures, you will learn about the key concepts necessary to understand financial markets, such as market completeness and the no-arbitrage theorem.

5. Choice under uncertainty: this class covers fundamental concepts concerning agents’ decisions when facing risk. These models are crucial to understand how the demand for financial assets originates.

6. Demand for risk: Building up on the previous chapters, we will study portfolio choice in a simplified setting. We will discuss how asset demand varies with risk, agent’s preferences and wealth.

7. Asset prices in a simplified context: We will focus on the portfolio choices of an investor, in a particular setting called mean-variance analysis. The mean-variance analysis will be a first step to introduce the notion of risk diversification, which is essential in finance.

8. Risk sharing and insurance: in this lecture, you will understand that risk can be shared among different agents and how, under certain conditions, this sharing can be optimal. You will learn about the distinction between individual idiosyncratic risk and macroeconomic risk.

9. Risk sharing and asset prices in a market equilibrium: this course builds up on previous lessons and presents the consumption-based Capital Asset Pricing Model (CAPM). The focus will be on how consumption, assets and prices are determined in equilibrium.
LiteraturMain reading material:

- "Investments", by Z. Bodie, A. Kane and A. Marcus, for the
introductory part of the course (see chapters 20 and 21 in
particular).
- "Finance and the Economics of Uncertainty" by G. Demange and G. Laroque, Blackwell, 2006.
- "The Economics of Risk and Time", by C. Gollier, MIT Press, 2001.

Other readings:
- "Intermediate Financial Theory" by J.-P. Danthine and J.B. Donaldson.
- Ingersoll, J., E., Theory of Financial Decision Making, Rowman and Littlefield Publishers.
- Leroy S and J. Werner, Principles of Financial Economics, Cambridge University Press, 2001
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesBasic mathematical skills needed (calculus, linear algebra, convex analysis). Students must be able to solve simple optimization problems (e.g. Lagrangian methods). Some knowledge in microeconomics would help but is not compulsory. The bases will be covered in class.
401-3629-00LQuantitative Risk Management Information W4 KP2V + 1UP. Cheridito
KurzbeschreibungThis course introduces methods from probability theory and statistics that can be used to model financial risks. Topics addressed include loss distributions, risk measures, extreme value theory, multivariate models, copulas, dependence structures and operational risk.
LernzielThe goal is to learn the most important methods from probability theory and statistics used in financial risk modeling.
Inhalt1. Introduction
2. Basic Concepts in Risk Management
3. Empirical Properties of Financial Data
4. Financial Time Series
5. Extreme Value Theory
6. Multivariate Models
7. Copulas and Dependence
8. Operational Risk
SkriptCourse material is available on https://people.math.ethz.ch/~patrickc/qrm
LiteraturQuantitative Risk Management: Concepts, Techniques and Tools
AJ McNeil, R Frey and P Embrechts
Princeton University Press, Princeton, 2015 (Revised Edition)
http://press.princeton.edu/titles/10496.html
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesThe course corresponds to the Risk Management requirement for the SAA ("Aktuar SAV Ausbildung") as well as for the Master of Science UZH-ETH in Quantitative Finance.
401-3888-00LIntroduction to Mathematical Finance Information
Ein verwandter Kurs ist 401-3913-01L Mathematical Foundations for Finance (3V+2U, 4 ECTS-KP). Obwohl beide Kurse unabhängig voneinander belegt werden können, darf nur einer ans gesamte Mathematik-Studium (Bachelor und Master) angerechnet werden.
W10 KP4V + 1UC. Czichowsky
KurzbeschreibungThis is an introductory course on the mathematics for investment, hedging, portfolio management, asset pricing and financial derivatives in discrete-time financial markets. We discuss arbitrage, completeness, risk-neutral pricing and utility maximisation. We prove the fundamental theorem of asset pricing and the hedging duality theorems, and also study convex duality in utility maximization.
LernzielThis is an introductory course on the mathematics for investment, hedging, portfolio management, asset pricing and financial derivatives in discrete-time financial markets. We discuss arbitrage, completeness, risk-neutral pricing and utility maximisation, and maybe other topics. We prove the fundamental theorem of asset pricing and the hedging duality theorems in discrete time, and also study convex duality in utility maximization.
InhaltThis course focuses on discrete-time financial markets. It presumes a knowledge of measure-theoretic probability theory (as taught e.g. in the course "Probability Theory"). The course is offered every year in the Spring semester.

This course is the first of a sequence of two courses on mathematical finance. The second course "Mathematical Finance" (MF II), 401-4889-00, focuses on continuous-time models. It is advisable that the present course, MF I, is taken prior to MF II.

For an overview of courses offered in the area of mathematical finance, see Link.
SkriptThe course is based on different parts from different textbooks as well as on original research literature. Lecture notes will not be available.
LiteraturLiterature:

Michael U. Dothan, "Prices in Financial Markets", Oxford University Press

Hans Föllmer and Alexander Schied, "Stochastic Finance: An Introduction in Discrete Time", de Gruyter

Marek Capinski and Ekkehard Kopp, "Discrete Models of Financial Markets", Cambridge University Press

Robert J. Elliott and P. Ekkehard Kopp, "Mathematics of Financial Markets", Springer
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesA related course is "Mathematical Foundations for Finance" (MFF), 401-3913-01. Although both courses can be taken independently of each other, only one will be given credit points for the Bachelor and the Master degree. In other words, it is also not possible to earn credit points with one for the Bachelor and with the other for the Master degree.

This course is the first of a sequence of two courses on mathematical finance. The second course "Mathematical Finance" (MF II), 401-4889-00, focuses on continuous-time models. It is advisable that the present course, MF I, is taken prior to MF II.

For an overview of courses offered in the area of mathematical finance, see Link.
401-3936-00LData Analytics for Non-Life Insurance PricingW4 KP2VC. M. Buser, M. V. Wüthrich
KurzbeschreibungWe study statistical methods in supervised learning for non-life insurance pricing such as generalized linear models, generalized additive models, Bayesian models, neural networks, classification and regression trees, random forests and gradient boosting machines.
LernzielThe student is familiar with classical actuarial pricing methods as well as with modern machine learning methods for insurance pricing and prediction.
InhaltWe present the following chapters:
- generalized linear models (GLMs)
- generalized additive models (GAMs)
- neural networks
- credibility theory
- classification and regression trees (CARTs)
- bagging, random forests and boosting
SkriptThe lecture notes are available from:
https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=2870308
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesThis course will be held in English and counts towards the diploma of "Aktuar SAV".
For the latter, see details under www.actuaries.ch

Good knowledge in probability theory, stochastic processes and statistics is assumed.
401-4658-00LComputational Methods for Quantitative Finance: PDE Methods Information Belegung eingeschränkt - Details anzeigen W6 KP3V + 1UC. Schwab
KurzbeschreibungIntroduction to principal methods of option pricing. Emphasis on PDE-based methods. Prerequisite MATLAB programming
and knowledge of numerical mathematics at ETH BSc level.
LernzielIntroduce the main methods for efficient numerical valuation of derivative contracts in a
Black Scholes as well as in incomplete markets due Levy processes or due to stochastic volatility
models. Develop implementation of pricing methods in MATLAB.
Finite-Difference/ Finite Element based methods for the solution of the pricing integrodifferential equation.
Inhalt1. Review of option pricing. Wiener and Levy price process models. Deterministic, local and stochastic
volatility models.
2. Finite Difference Methods for option pricing. Relation to bi- and multinomial trees.
European contracts.
3. Finite Difference methods for Asian, American and Barrier type contracts.
4. Finite element methods for European and American style contracts.
5. Pricing under local and stochastic volatility in Black-Scholes Markets.
6. Finite Element Methods for option pricing under Levy processes. Treatment of
integrodifferential operators.
7. Stochastic volatility models for Levy processes.
8. Techniques for multidimensional problems. Baskets in a Black-Scholes setting and
stochastic volatility models in Black Scholes and Levy markets.
9. Introduction to sparse grid option pricing techniques.
SkriptThere will be english, typed lecture notes as well as MATLAB software for registered participants in the course.
LiteraturR. Cont and P. Tankov : Financial Modelling with Jump Processes, Chapman and Hall Publ. 2004.

Y. Achdou and O. Pironneau : Computational Methods for Option Pricing, SIAM Frontiers in Applied Mathematics, SIAM Publishers, Philadelphia 2005.

D. Lamberton and B. Lapeyre : Introduction to stochastic calculus Applied to Finance (second edition), Chapman & Hall/CRC Financial Mathematics Series, Taylor & Francis Publ. Boca Raton, London, New York 2008.

J.-P. Fouque, G. Papanicolaou and K.-R. Sircar : Derivatives in financial markets with stochastic volatility, Cambridge Univeristy Press, Cambridge, 2000.

N. Hilber, O. Reichmann, Ch. Schwab and Ch. Winter: Computational Methods for Quantitative Finance, Springer Finance, Springer, 2013.
401-8915-00LAdvanced Financial Economics (University of Zurich)
Der Kurs muss direkt an der UZH belegt werden.
UZH Modulkürzel: MFOEC206

Beachten Sie die Einschreibungstermine an der UZH: https://www.uzh.ch/cmsssl/de/studies/application/mobilitaet.html
W6 KP4GUni-Dozierende
KurzbeschreibungPortfolio Theory, CAPM, Financial Derivatives, Incomplete Markets, Corporate Finance, Behavioural Finance, Evolutionary Finance
LernzielStudents should get familiar with the cornerstones of modern financial economics.
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesThis course replaces "Advanced Financial Economics" (MFOEC105), which will be discontinued. Students who have taken "Advanced Financial Economics" (MFOEC105) in the past, are not allowed to book this course "Advanced Financial Economics" (MFOEC206).

There will be a podcast for this lecture.
701-0412-00LKlimasystemeW3 KP2GS. I. Seneviratne, L. Gudmundsson
KurzbeschreibungDie wichtigsten physikalischen Komponenten des Klimasystems und deren Wechselwirkungen werden eingeführt. Vor dem Hintergrund der Klimageschichte - und variabilität werden die Mechanismen des anthropogenen Klimawandels analysiert. Absolvierende des Kurses sind in der Lage, einfache Problemstellungen aus dem Bereich der Klimasysteme zu identifizieren und erläutern.
LernzielStudierende können:
- die wichtigsten physikalischen Komponenten des goblaben Klimasystems beschreiben und ihre Wechselwirkungen skizzieren.
- die Mechanismen des anthropogenen Klimawandels erklären.
einfache Problemstellungen aus dem Bereich der Klimasysteme identifizieren und erläutern.
SkriptKopien der Folien werden elektronisch zur Verfuegung gestellt.
LiteraturEine vollständige Literaturliste wird abgegeben. Insbesondere empfohlen sind:
- Hartmann, D., 2016: Global Physical Climatology. Academic Press, London, 485 pp.
- Peixoto, J.P. and A.H. Oort, 1992: Physics of Climate. American Institute of Physics, New York, 520 pp.
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesDozierende: Sonia I. Seneviratne & Lukas Gudmundsson, mehrere Vorträge zu Spezialthemen von anderen Dozenten
Unterrichtssprache: deutsch/englisch
Sprache der Folien: englisch
701-1216-00LNumerical Modelling of Weather and Climate Information W4 KP3GC. Schär, S. Soerland, J. Vergara Temprado
KurzbeschreibungThe course provides an introduction to weather and climate models. It discusses how these models are built addressing both the dynamical core and the physical parameterizations, and it provides an overview of how these models are used in numerical weather prediction and climate research. As a tutorial, students conduct a term project and build a simple atmospheric model using the language PYTHON.
LernzielAt the end of this course, students understand how weather and climate models are formulated from the governing physical principles, and how they are used for climate and weather prediction purposes.
InhaltThe course provides an introduction into the following themes: numerical methods (finite differences and spectral methods); adiabatic formulation of atmospheric models (vertical coordinates, hydrostatic approximation); parameterization of physical processes (e.g. clouds, convection, boundary layer, radiation); atmospheric data assimilation and weather prediction; predictability (chaos-theory, ensemble methods); climate models (coupled atmospheric, oceanic and biogeochemical models); climate prediction. Hands-on experience with simple models will be acquired in the tutorials.
SkriptSlides and lecture notes will be made available at
Link
LiteraturList of literature will be provided.
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesPrerequisites: to follow this course, you need some basic background in atmospheric science, numerical methods (e.g., "Numerische Methoden in der Umweltphysik", 701-0461-00L) as well as experience in programming. Previous experience with PYTHON is useful but not required.
701-1226-00LInter-Annual Phenomena and Their Prediction Information W2 KP2GC. Appenzeller
KurzbeschreibungThis course provides an overview of the current ability to understand and predict intra-seasonal and inter-annual climate variability in the tropical and extra-tropical region and provides insights on how operational weather and climate services are organized.
LernzielStudents will acquire an understanding of the key atmosphere and ocean processes involved, will gain experience in analyzing and predicting sub-seasonal to inter-annual variability and learn how operational weather and climate services are organised and how scientific developments can improve these services.
InhaltThe course covers the following topics:

Part 1:
- Introduction, some basic concepts and examples of sub-seasonal and inter-annual variability
- Weather and climate data and the statistical concepts used for analysing inter-annual variability (e.g. correlation analysis, teleconnection maps, EOF analysis)

Part 2:
- Inter-annual variability in the tropical region (e.g. ENSO, MJO)
- Inter-annual variability in the extra-tropical region (e.g. Blocking, NAO, PNA, regimes)

Part 3:
- Prediction of inter-annual variability (statistical methods, ensemble prediction systems, monthly and seasonal forecasts, seamless forecasts)
- Verification and interpretation of probabilistic forecast systems
- Climate change and inter-annual variability

Part 4:
- Scientific challenges for operational weather and climate services
- A visit to the forecasting centre of MeteoSwiss
SkriptA pdf version of the slides will be available at
http://www.iac.ethz.ch/edu/courses/master/modules/interannual-phenomena.html
LiteraturReferences are given during the lecture.
701-1252-00LClimate Change Uncertainty and Risk: From Probabilistic Forecasts to Economics of Climate Adaptation Belegung eingeschränkt - Details anzeigen W3 KP2V + 1UD. N. Bresch, R. Knutti
KurzbeschreibungThe course introduces the concepts of predictability, probability, uncertainty and probabilistic risk modelling and their application to climate modeling and the economics of climate adaptation.
LernzielStudents will acquire knowledge in uncertainty and risk quantification (probabilistic modelling) and an understanding of the economics of climate adaptation. They will become able to construct their own uncertainty and risk assessment models (in Python), hence basic understanding of scientific programming forms a prerequisite of the course.
InhaltThe first part of the course covers methods to quantify uncertainty in detecting and attributing human influence on climate change and to generate probabilistic climate change projections on global to regional scales. Model evaluation, calibration and structural error are discussed. In the second part, quantification of risks associated with local climate impacts and the economics of different baskets of climate adaptation options are assessed – leading to informed decisions to optimally allocate resources. Such pre-emptive risk management allows evaluating a mix of prevention, preparation, response, recovery, and (financial) risk transfer actions, resulting in an optimal balance of public and private contributions to risk management, aiming at a more resilient society.
The course provides an introduction to the following themes:
1) basics of probabilistic modelling and quantification of uncertainty from global climate change to local impacts of extreme events
2) methods to optimize and constrain model parameters using observations
3) risk management from identification (perception) and understanding (assessment, modelling) to actions (prevention, preparation, response, recovery, risk transfer)
4) basics of economic evaluation, economic decision making in the presence of climate risks and pre-emptive risk management to optimally allocate resources
SkriptPowerpoint slides will be made available.
LiteraturMany papers for in-depth study will be referred to during the lecture.
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesHands-on experience with probabilistic climate models and risk models will be acquired in the tutorials; hence good understanding of scientific programming forms a prerequisite of the course, in Python (teaching language, object oriented) or similar. Basic understanding of the climate system, e.g. as covered in the course 'Klimasysteme' is required.

Examination: graded tutorials during the semester (benotete Semesterleistung)
701-1270-00LHigh Performance Computing for Weather and ClimateW3 KP3GO. Fuhrer
KurzbeschreibungState-of-the-art weather and climate simulations rely on large and complex software running on supercomputers. This course focuses on programming methods and tools for understanding, developing and optimizing the computational aspects of weather and climate models. Emphasis will be placed on the foundations of parallel computing, practical exercises and emerging trends such as heterogeneous comput
LernzielAfter attending this course, students will be able to:
- understand a broad variety of high performance computing concepts relevant for weather and climate simulations
- work with weather and climate simulation codes that run on large supercomputers
InhaltHPC Overview:
- Why does weather and climate require HPC?
- Today's HPC: Beowulf-style clusters, massively parallel architectures, hybrid computing, accelerators
- Scaling / Parallel efficiency
- Algorithmic motifs in weather and climate

Writing HPC code:
- Data locality and single node efficiency
- Shared memory parallelism with OpenMP
- Distributed memory parallelism with MPI
- GPU computing
- High-level programming and domain-specific languages
Literatur- Introduction to High Performance Computing for Scientists and Engineers, G. Hager and G. Wellein, CRC Press, 2011
- Computer Organization and Design, D.H. Patterson and J.L. Hennessy
- Parallel Computing, A. Grama, A. Gupta, G. Karypis, V. Kumar (https://www-users.cs.umn.edu/~karypis/parbook/)
- Parallel Programming in MPI and OpenMP, V. Eijkhout (http://pages.tacc.utexas.edu/~eijkhout/pcse/html/index.html)
Voraussetzungen / Besonderes- fundamentals of numerical analysis and atmospheric modeling
- basic experience in a programming language (C/C++, Fortran, Python, …)
- experience using command line interfaces in *nix environments (e.g., Unix, Linux)
851-0252-06LIntroduction to Social Networks: Theory, Methods and Applications
This course is intended for students interested in data analysis and with basic knowledge of inferential statistics.
W3 KP2GC. Stadtfeld, T. Elmer
KurzbeschreibungHumans are connected by various social relations. When aggregated, we speak of social networks. This course discusses how social networks are structured, how they change over time and how they affect the individuals that they connect. It integrates social theory with practical knowledge of cutting-edge statistical methods and applications from a number of scientific disciplines.
LernzielThe aim is to enable students to contribute to social networks research and to be discriminating consumers of modern literature on social networks. Students will acquire a thorough understanding of social networks theory (1), practical skills in cutting-edge statistical methods (2) and their applications in a number of scientific fields (3).
In particular, at the end of the course students will
- Know the fundamental theories in social networks research (1)
- Understand core concepts of social networks and their relevance in different contexts (1, 3)
- Be able to describe and visualize networks data in the R environment (2)
- Understand differences regarding analysis and collection of network data and other type of survey data (2)
- Know state-of-the-art inferential statistical methods and how they are used in R (2)
- Be familiar with the core empirical studies in social networks research (2, 3)
- Know how network methods can be employed in a variety of scientific disciplines (3)
363-1091-00LSocial Data ScienceW3 KP2GD. Garcia Becerra
KurzbeschreibungSocial Data Science is introduced as a set of techniques to analyze human behavior and social interaction through digital traces.
The course focuses both on the fundamentals and applications of Data Science in the Social Sciences, including technologies for data retrieval, processing, and analysis with the aim to derive insights that are interpretable from a wider theoretical perspective.
LernzielA successful participant of this course will be able to
- understand a wide variety of techniques to retrieve digital trace data from online data sources
- store, process, and summarize online data for quantitative analysis
- perform statistical analyses to test hypotheses, derive insights, and formulate predictions
- implement streamlined software that integrates data retrieval, processing, statistical analysis, and visualization
- interpret the results of data analysis with respect to theoretical and testable principles of human behavior
- understand the limitations of observational data analysis with respect to data volume, statistical power, and external validity
InhaltSocial Data Science (SDS) provides a broad approach to the quantitative analysis of human behavior through digital trace data.
SDS integrates the implementation of data retrieval and processing, the application of statistical analysis methods, and the interpretation of results to derive insights of human behavior at high resolutions and large scales.
The motivation of SDS stems from theories in the Social Sciences, which are addressed with respect to societal phenomena and formulated as principles that can be tested against empirical data.
Data retrieval in SDS is performed in an automated manner, accessing online databases and programming interfaces that capture the digital traces of human behavior.
Data processing is computerized with calibrated methods that quantify human behavior, for example constructing social networks or measuring emotional expression.
These quantities are used in statistical analyses to both test hypotheses and explore new aspects on human behavior.

The course starts with an introduction to Social Data Science and the R statistical language, followed by three content blocks: collective behavior, sentiment analysis, and social network analysis. The course ends with a datathon that sets the starting point of final student projects.

The course will cover various examples of the application of SDS:
- Search trends to measure information seeking
- Popularity and social impact
- Evaluation of sentiment analysis techniques
- Quantitative analysis of emotions and social media sharing
- Twitter social network analysis

The lectures include theoretical foundations of the application of digital trace data in the Social Sciences, as well as practical examples of data retrieval, processing, and analysis cases in the R statistical language from a literate programming perspective.
The block course contains lectures and exercise sessions during the morning and afternoon of five days.
Exercise classes provide practical skills and discuss the solutions to exercises that build on the concepts and methods presented in the previous lectures.
SkriptThe lecture slides will be available on the Moodle platform, for registered students only.
LiteraturSee handouts. Specific literature is provided for download, for registered students only.
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesParticipants of the course should have some basic background in statistics and programming, and an interest to learn about human behavior from a quantitative perspective.

Prior knowledge of advanced R, information retrieval, or information systems is not necessary.

Exercise sessions build on technical and theoretical content explained in the lectures. Students need a working laptop with Internet access to perform guided exercises.

Course evaluation is based on short quizzes at the end of each day from Monday to Thursday (5% each for a total of 20%), a 45-minute exam during the last session (30%), and on the grade of a final project report (50%). Final projects can be done individually or in pairs. Final projects will be composed of a text report (max 6 pages) and the R code to generate the results. The deadline to deliver the final project will be at the end of the Easter break, approximately 2 months after the course.

The course takes place between Feb 10th and Feb 14th (both inclusive), from 9:15 to 12:00 and from 13:15 to 16:00.
227-0395-00LNeural SystemsW6 KP2V + 1U + 1AR. Hahnloser, M. F. Yanik, B. Grewe
KurzbeschreibungThis course introduces principles of information processing in neural systems. It covers basic neuroscience for engineering students, experiment techniques used in animal research and methods for inferring neural mechanisms. Students learn about neural information processing and basic principles of natural intelligence and their impact on artificially intelligent systems.
LernzielThis course introduces
- Basic neurophysiology and mathematical descriptions of neurons
- Methods for dissecting animal behavior
- Neural recordings in intact nervous systems and information decoding principles
- Methods for manipulating the state and activity in selective neuron types
- Neuromodulatory systems and their computational roles
- Reward circuits and reinforcement learning
- Imaging methods for reconstructing the synaptic networks among neurons
- Birdsong and language
- Neurobiological principles for machine learning.
InhaltFrom active membranes to propagation of action potentials. From synaptic physiology to synaptic learning rules. From receptive fields to neural population decoding. From fluorescence imaging to connectomics. Methods for reading and manipulation neural ensembles. From classical conditioning to reinforcement learning. From the visual system to deep convolutional networks. Brain architectures for learning and memory. From birdsong to computational linguistics.
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesBefore taking this course, students are encouraged to complete "Bioelectronics and Biosensors" (227-0393-10L).

As part of the exercises for this class, students are expected to complete a programming or literature review project to be defined at the beginning of the semester.
227-0973-00LTranslational Neuromodeling Information W8 KP3V + 2U + 1AK. Stephan
KurzbeschreibungThis course provides a systematic introduction to Translational Neuromodeling (the development of mathematical models for diagnostics of brain diseases) and their application to concrete clinical questions (Computational Psychiatry/Psychosomatics). It focuses on a generative modeling strategy and teaches (hierarchical) Bayesian models of neuroimaging data and behaviour, incl. exercises.
LernzielTo obtain an understanding of the goals, concepts and methods of Translational Neuromodeling and Computational Psychiatry/Psychosomatics, particularly with regard to Bayesian models of neuroimaging (fMRI, EEG) and behavioural data.
InhaltThis course provides a systematic introduction to Translational Neuromodeling (the development of mathematical models for diagnostics of brain diseases) and their application to concrete clinical questions (Computational Psychiatry/Psychosomatics). The first part of the course will introduce disease concepts from psychiatry and psychosomatics, their history, and clinical priority problems. The second part of the course concerns computational modeling of neuronal and cognitive processes for clinical applications. A particular focus is on Bayesian methods and generative models, for example, dynamic causal models for inferring neuronal processes from neuroimaging data, and hierarchical Bayesian models for inference on cognitive processes from behavioural data. The course discusses the mathematical and statistical principles behind these models, illustrates their application to various psychiatric diseases, and outlines a general research strategy based on generative models.

Lecture topics include:
1. Introduction to Translational Neuromodeling and Computational Psychiatry/Psychosomatics
2. Psychiatric nosology
3. Pathophysiology of psychiatric disease mechanisms
4. Principles of Bayesian inference and generative modeling
5. Variational Bayes (VB)
6. Bayesian model selection
7. Markov Chain Monte Carlo techniques (MCMC)
8. Bayesian frameworks for understanding psychiatric and psychosomatic diseases
9. Generative models of fMRI data
10. Generative models of electrophysiological data
11. Generative models of behavioural data
12. Computational concepts of schizophrenia, depression and autism
13. Model-based predictions about individual patients

Practical exercises include mathematical derivations and the implementation of specific models and inference methods. In additional project work, students are required to use one of the examples discussed in the course as a basis for developing their own generative model and use it for simulations and/or inference in application to a clinical question. Group work (up to 3 students) is permitted.
LiteraturSee TNU website:
https://www.tnu.ethz.ch/en/teaching.html
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesGood knowledge of principles of statistics, good programming skills (MATLAB or Python)
227-1032-00LNeuromorphic Engineering II Information
Information für UZH Studierende:
Die Lerneinheit kann nur an der ETH belegt werden. Die Belegung des Moduls INI405 ist an der UZH nicht möglich.

Beachten Sie die Einschreibungstermine an der ETH für UZH Studierende: Link
W6 KP5GS.‑C. Liu, T. Delbrück, G. Indiveri
KurzbeschreibungThis course teaches the basics of analog chip design and layout with an emphasis on neuromorphic circuits, which are introduced in the fall semester course "Neuromorphic Engineering I".
LernzielDesign of a neuromorphic circuit for implementation with CMOS technology.
InhaltThis course teaches the basics of analog chip design and layout with an emphasis on neuromorphic circuits, which are introduced in the autumn semester course "Neuromorphic Engineering I".

The principles of CMOS processing technology are presented. Using a set of inexpensive software tools for simulation, layout and verification, suitable for neuromorphic circuits, participants learn to simulate circuits on the transistor level and to make their layouts on the mask level. Important issues in the layout of neuromorphic circuits will be explained and illustrated with examples. In the latter part of the semester students simulate and layout a neuromorphic chip. Schematics of basic building blocks will be provided. The layout will then be fabricated and will be tested by students during the following fall semester.
LiteraturS.-C. Liu et al.: Analog VLSI Circuits and Principles; software documentation.
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesPrerequisites: Neuromorphic Engineering I strongly recommended
227-1034-00LComputational Vision (University of Zurich)
No enrolment to this course at ETH Zurich. Book the corresponding module directly at UZH.
UZH Module Code: INI402

Mind the enrolment deadlines at UZH:
https://www.uzh.ch/cmsssl/en/studies/application/mobilitaet.html
W6 KP2V + 1UD. Kiper
KurzbeschreibungThis course focuses on neural computations that underlie visual perception. We study how visual signals are processed in the retina, LGN and visual cortex. We study the morpholgy and functional architecture of cortical circuits responsible for pattern, motion, color, and three-dimensional vision.
LernzielThis course considers the operation of circuits in the process of neural computations. The evolution of neural systems will be considered to demonstrate how neural structures and mechanisms are optimised for energy capture, transduction, transmission and representation of information. Canonical brain circuits will be described as models for the analysis of sensory information. The concept of receptive fields will be introduced and their role in coding spatial and temporal information will be considered. The constraints of the bandwidth of neural channels and the mechanisms of normalization by neural circuits will be discussed.
The visual system will form the basis of case studies in the computation of form, depth, and motion. The role of multiple channels and collective computations for object recognition will
be considered. Coordinate transformations of space and time by cortical and subcortical mechanisms will be analysed. The means by which sensory and motor systems are integrated to allow for adaptive behaviour will be considered.
InhaltThis course considers the operation of circuits in the process of neural computations. The evolution of neural systems will be considered to demonstrate how neural structures and mechanisms are optimised for energy capture, transduction, transmission and representation of information. Canonical brain circuits will be described as models for the analysis of sensory information. The concept of receptive fields will be introduced and their role in coding spatial and temporal information will be considered. The constraints of the bandwidth of neural channels and the mechanisms of normalization by neural circuits will be discussed.
The visual system will form the basis of case studies in the computation of form, depth, and motion. The role of multiple channels and collective computations for object recognition will
be considered. Coordinate transformations of space and time by cortical and subcortical mechanisms will be analysed. The means by which sensory and motor systems are integrated to allow for adaptive behaviour will be considered.
LiteraturBooks: (recommended references, not required)
1. An Introduction to Natural Computation, D. Ballard (Bradford Books, MIT Press) 1997.
2. The Handbook of Brain Theorie and Neural Networks, M. Arbib (editor), (MIT Press) 1995.
851-0739-01LSequencing Legal DNA: NLP for Law and Political Economy
Particularly suitable for students of D-INFK, D-ITET, D-MTEC
W3 KP2VE. Ash
KurzbeschreibungThis course explores the application of natural language processing techniques to texts in law, politics, and the news media. Students will put these tools to work in a course project.
LernzielLaw is embedded in language. An essential task for a judge, therefore, is reading legal texts to interpret case facts and apply legal rules. Can an artificial intelligence learn to do these tasks? The recent and ongoing breakthroughs in natural language processing (NLP) hint at this possibility.

Meanwhile, a vast and growing corpus of legal documents are being digitized and put online for use by the public. No single human could hope to read all of them, yet many of these documents remain untouched by NLP techniques. This course invites students to participate in these new explorations applying NLP to the law -- that is, sequencing legal DNA.
InhaltNLP technologies have the potential to assist judges in their decisions by making them more efficient and consistent. On the other hand, legal language choices -- as in legal choices more generally -- could be biased toward some groups, and automated systems could entrench those biases. We will explore, critique, and integrate the emerging set of tools for debiasing language models and think carefully about how notions of fairness should be applied in this domain.

More generally, we will explore the use of NLP for social science research, not just in the law but also in politics, the economy, and culture. In a semester paper, students (individually or in groups) will conceive and implement their own research project applying natural language tools to legal or political texts.
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesSome programming experience in Python is required, and some experience with NLP is highly recommended.
851-0739-02LSequencing Legal DNA: NLP for Law and Political Economy (Course Project)
This is the optional course project for "Building a Robot Judge: Data Science for the Law."

Please register only if attending the lecture course or with consent of the instructor.

Some programming experience in Python is required, and some experience with text mining is highly recommended.
W2 KP2VE. Ash
KurzbeschreibungThis is the companion course for extra credit for a more substantial project, for the course "Sequencing Legal DNA: NLP for Law and Political Economy".
Lernziel
851-0740-00LBig Data, Law, and Policy Belegung eingeschränkt - Details anzeigen
Number of participants limited to 35

Students will be informed by 1.3.2020 at the latest.
W3 KP2SS. Bechtold
KurzbeschreibungThis course introduces students to societal perspectives on the big data revolution. Discussing important contributions from machine learning and data science, the course explores their legal, economic, ethical, and political implications in the past, present, and future.
LernzielThis course is intended both for students of machine learning and data science who want to reflect on the societal implications of their field, and for students from other disciplines who want to explore the societal impact of data sciences. The course will first discuss some of the methodological foundations of machine learning, followed by a discussion of research papers and real-world applications where big data and societal values may clash. Potential topics include the implications of big data for privacy, liability, insurance, health systems, voting, and democratic institutions, as well as the use of predictive algorithms for price discrimination and the criminal justice system. Guest speakers, weekly readings and reaction papers ensure a lively debate among participants from various backgrounds.
363-1100-00LRisk Case Study Challenge Belegung eingeschränkt - Details anzeigen
Findet dieses Semester nicht statt.
W3 KP2SA. Bommier, S. Feuerriegel
KurzbeschreibungThis seminar provides master students at ETH with the challenging opportunity of working on a real risk modelling and risk management case in close collaboration with a Risk Center Partner Company. For the Spring 2019 Edition the Partner will be Zurich Insurance Group.
LernzielStudents work on a real risk-related case of a business relevant topic provided by experts from Risk Center partners. While gaining substantial insights into the risk modeling and management of the industry, students explore the case or problem on their own, working in teams, and develop possible solutions. The cases allow students to use logical problem solving skills with emphasis on evidence and application and involve the integration of scientific knowledge. Typically, the risk-related cases can be complex, cover ambiguities, and may be addressed in more than one way. During the seminar students visit the partners’ headquarters, conduct interviews with members of the management team as well as internal and external experts, and present their results.
InhaltGet a basic understanding of
o The insurance and reinsurance business
o Risk management and risk modelling
o The role of operational risk management

Get in contact with industry experts and conduct interviews on the topic.

Conduct a small empirical study and present findings to the company
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesPlease apply for this course via the official website (www.riskcenter.ethz.ch/education/lectures/risk-case-study-challenge-.html). Apply no later than February 15, 2019.
The number of participants is limited to 14.
Seminar
NummerTitelTypECTSUmfangDozierende
261-5113-00LComputational Challenges in Medical Genomics Information Belegung eingeschränkt - Details anzeigen
Number of participants limited to 20.
W2 KP2SA. Kahles, G. Rätsch
KurzbeschreibungThis seminar discusses recent relevant contributions to the fields of computational genomics, algorithmic bioinformatics, statistical genetics and related areas. Each participant will hold a presentation and lead the subsequent discussion.
LernzielPreparing and holding a scientific presentation in front of peers is a central part of working in the scientific domain. In this seminar, the participants will learn how to efficiently summarize the relevant parts of a scientific publication, critically reflect its contents, and summarize it for presentation to an audience. The necessary skills to succesfully present the key points of existing research work are the same as needed to communicate own research ideas.
In addition to holding a presentation, each student will both contribute to as well as lead a discussion section on the topics presented in the class.
InhaltThe topics covered in the seminar are related to recent computational challenges that arise from the fields of genomics and biomedicine, including but not limited to genomic variant interpretation, genomic sequence analysis, compressive genomics tasks, single-cell approaches, privacy considerations, statistical frameworks, etc.
Both recently published works contributing novel ideas to the areas mentioned above as well as seminal contributions from the past are amongst the list of selected papers.
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesKnowledge of algorithms and data structures and interest in applications in genomics and computational biomedicine.
263-3840-00LHardware Architectures for Machine Learning Information
The deadline for deregistering expires at the end of the second week of the semester. Students who are still registered after that date, but do not attend the seminar, will officially fail the seminar.
W2 KP2SG. Alonso, T. Hoefler, C. Zhang
KurzbeschreibungThe seminar covers recent results in the increasingly important field of hardware acceleration for data science and machine learning, both in dedicated machines or in data centers.
LernzielThe seminar aims at students interested in the system aspects of machine learning, who are willing to bridge the gap across traditional disciplines: machine learning, databases, systems, and computer architecture.
InhaltThe seminar is intended to cover recent results in the increasingly important field of hardware acceleration for data science and machine learning, both in dedicated machines or in data centers.
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesThe seminar should be of special interest to students intending to complete a master's thesis or a doctoral dissertation in related topics.
263-5225-00LAdvanced Topics in Machine Learning and Data Science Belegung eingeschränkt - Details anzeigen
Number of participants limited to 20.

The deadline for deregistering expires at the end of the fourth week of the semester. Students who are still registered after that date, but do not attend the seminar, will officially fail the seminar.
W2 KP2SF. Perez Cruz
KurzbeschreibungIn this seminar, recent papers of the machine learning and data science literature are presented and discussed. Possible topics cover statistical models, machine learning algorithms and its applications.
LernzielThe seminar “Advanced Topics in Machine Learning and Data Science” familiarizes students with recent developments in machine learning and data science. Recently published articles, as well as influential papers, have to be presented and critically reviewed. The students will learn how to structure a scientific presentation, which covers the motivation, key ideas and main results of a scientific paper. An important goal of the seminar presentation is to summarize the essential ideas of the paper in sufficient depth for the audience to be able to follow its main conclusion, especially why the article is (or is not) worth attention. The presentation style will play an important role and should reach the level of professional scientific presentations.
InhaltThe seminar will cover a number of recent papers which have emerged as important contributions to the machine learning and data science literatures. The topics will vary from year to year but they are centered on methodological issues in machine learning and its application, not only to text or images, but other scientific
domains like medicine, climate or physics.
LiteraturThe papers will be presented in the first session of the seminar.
401-3620-20LStudent Seminar in Statistics: Inference in Non-Classical Regression Models Belegung eingeschränkt - Details anzeigen
Maximale Teilnehmerzahl: 24
Hauptsächlich für Studierende der Bachelor- und Master-Studiengänge Mathematik, welche nach der einführenden Lerneinheit 401-2604-00L Wahrscheinlichkeit und Statistik (Probability and Statistics) mindestens ein Kernfach oder Wahlfach in Statistik besucht haben. Das Seminar wird auch für Studierende der Master-Studiengänge Statistik bzw. Data Science angeboten.
W4 KP2SF. Balabdaoui
KurzbeschreibungReview of some non-standard regression models and the statistical properties of estimation methods in such models.
LernzielThe main goal is the students get to discover some less known regression models which either generalize the well-known linear model (for example monotone regression) or violate some of the most fundamental assumptions (as in shuffled or unlinked regression models).
InhaltLinear regression is one of the most used models for prediction and hence one of the most understood in statistical literature. However, linearity might too simplistic to capture the actual relationship between some response and given covariates. Also, there are many real data problems where linearity is plausible but the actual pairing between the observed covariates and responses is completely lost or at partially. In this seminar, we review some of the non-classical regression models and the statistical properties of the estimation methods considered by well-known statisticians and machine learners. This will encompass:
1. Monotone regression
2. Single index model
3. Unlinked regression
4. Partially unlinked regression
SkriptNo script is necessary for this seminar
LiteraturIn the following is the material that will read and studied by each pair of students (all the items listed below are available through the ETH electronic library or arXiv):

1. Chapter 2 from the book "Nonparametric estimation under shape constraints" by P. Groeneboom and G. Jongbloed, 2014, Cambridge University Press

2. "Nonparametric shape-restricted regression" by A. Guntuoyina and B. Sen, 2018, Statistical Science, Volume 33, 568-594

3. "Asymptotic distributions for two estimators of the single index model" by Y. Xia, 2006, Econometric Theory, Volume 22, 1112-1137

4. "Least squares estimation in the monotone single index model" by F. Balabdaoui, C. Durot and H. K. Jankowski, Journal of Bernoulli, 2019, Volume 4B, 3276-3310

5. "Least angle regression" by B. Efron, T. Hastie, I. Johnstone, and R. Tibshirani, 2004, Annals of Statsitics, Volume 32, 407-499.

6. "Sharp thresholds for high dimensional and noisy sparsity recovery using l1-constrained quadratic programming (Lasso)" by M. Wainwright, 2009, IEEE transactions in Information Theory, Volume 55, 1-19

7."Denoising linear models with permuted data" by A. Pananjady, M. Wainwright and T. A. Courtade and , 2017, IEEE International Symposium on Information Theory, 446-450.

8. "Linear regression with shuffled data: statistical and computation limits of permutation recovery" by A. Pananjady, M. Wainwright and T. A. Courtade , 2018, IEEE transactions in Information Theory, Volume 64, 3286-3300

9. "Linear regression without correspondence" by D. Hsu, K. Shi and X. Sun, 2017, NIPS

10. "A pseudo-likelihood approach to linear regression with partially shuffled data" by M. Slawski, G. Diao, E. Ben-David, 2019, arXiv.

11. "Uncoupled isotonic regression via minimum Wasserstein deconvolution" by P. Rigollet and J. Weed, 2019, Information and Inference, Volume 00, 1-27
GESS Wissenschaft im Kontext
NummerTitelTypECTSUmfangDozierende
851-0740-00LBig Data, Law, and Policy Belegung eingeschränkt - Details anzeigen
Number of participants limited to 35

Students will be informed by 1.3.2020 at the latest.
W3 KP2SS. Bechtold
KurzbeschreibungThis course introduces students to societal perspectives on the big data revolution. Discussing important contributions from machine learning and data science, the course explores their legal, economic, ethical, and political implications in the past, present, and future.
LernzielThis course is intended both for students of machine learning and data science who want to reflect on the societal implications of their field, and for students from other disciplines who want to explore the societal impact of data sciences. The course will first discuss some of the methodological foundations of machine learning, followed by a discussion of research papers and real-world applications where big data and societal values may clash. Potential topics include the implications of big data for privacy, liability, insurance, health systems, voting, and democratic institutions, as well as the use of predictive algorithms for price discrimination and the criminal justice system. Guest speakers, weekly readings and reaction papers ensure a lively debate among participants from various backgrounds.
» siehe Studiengang Wissenschaft im Kontext: Typ A: Förderung allgemeiner Reflexionsfähigkeiten
» Empfehlungen aus dem Bereich Wissenschaft im Kontext (Typ B) für das D-INFK
» siehe Studiengang Wissenschaft im Kontext: Sprachkurse ETH/UZH
Master-Arbeit
NummerTitelTypECTSUmfangDozierende
261-0800-00LMaster's Thesis
Zur Master-Arbeit wird nur zugelassen, wer:
- das Bachelor-Studium erfolgreich abgeschlossen hat;
- allfällige Auflagen für die Zulassung zum Studiengang erfüllt hat
- in der Kategorie "Kernfächer" mindestens 50 KP erworben hat, darunter die je minimal erforderlichen 16 KP in den Unterkategorien "Datenanalyse"
sowie "Datenmanagement und Datenverarbeitung" und
- in der Kategorie "Data Science Projektkurs" die erforderlichen 14 KP erworben hat.
O30 KP64DProfessor/innen
KurzbeschreibungDie Master-Arbeit bildet den Abschluss des Master-Studiums. Die Studierenden weisen mit der Master-Arbeit ihre Fähigkeit zu selbständiger und wissenschaftlich strukturierter Tätigkeit nach.
LernzielMit der Master-Arbeit sollen die Studierenden Ihre Fähigkeit zu selbständiger und wissenschaftlich strukturierter Tätigkeit aufzeigen.