Search result: Catalogue data in Spring Semester 2020

Process Engineering Master Information
Core Courses
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
227-0966-00LQuantitative Big Imaging: From Images to StatisticsW4 credits2V + 1UP. A. Kaestner, M. Stampanoni
AbstractThe lecture focuses on the challenging task of extracting robust, quantitative metrics from imaging data and is intended to bridge the gap between pure signal processing and the experimental science of imaging. The course will focus on techniques, scalability, and science-driven analysis.
Objective1. Introduction of applied image processing for research science covering basic image processing, quantitative methods, and statistics.
2. Understanding of imaging as a means to accomplish a scientific goal.
3. Ability to apply quantitative methods to complex 3D data to determine the validity of a hypothesis
ContentImaging is a well established field and is rapidly growing as technological improvements push the limits of resolution in space, time, material and functional sensitivity. These improvements have meant bigger, more diverse datasets being acquired at an ever increasing rate. With methods varying from focused ion beams to X-rays to magnetic resonance, the sources for these images are exceptionally heterogeneous; however, the tools and techniques for processing these images and transforming them into quantitative, biologically or materially meaningful information are similar.
The course consists of equal parts theory and practical analysis of first synthetic and then real imaging datasets. Basic aspects of image processing are covered such as filtering, thresholding, and morphology. From these concepts a series of tools will be developed for analyzing arbitrary images in a very generic manner. Specifically a series of methods will be covered, e.g. characterizing shape, thickness, tortuosity, alignment, and spatial distribution of material features like pores. From these metrics the statistics aspect of the course will be developed where reproducibility, robustness, and sensitivity will be investigated in order to accurately determine the precision and accuracy of these quantitative measurements. A major emphasis of the course will be scalability and the tools of the 'Big Data' trend will be discussed and how cluster, cloud, and new high-performance large dataset techniques can be applied to analyze imaging datasets. In addition, given the importance of multi-scale systems, a data-management and analysis approach based on modern databases will be presented for storing complex hierarchical information in a flexible manner. Finally as a concluding project the students will apply the learned methods on real experimental data from the latest 3D experiments taken from either their own work / research or partnered with an experimental imaging group.
The course provides the necessary background to perform the quantitative evaluation of complicated 3D imaging data in a minimally subjective or arbitrary manner to answer questions coming from the fields of physics, biology, medicine, material science, and paleontology.
Lecture notesAvailable online.
LiteratureWill be indicated during the lecture.
Prerequisites / NoticeIdeally students will have some familiarity with basic manipulation and programming in languages like Python, Matlab, or R. Interested students who are worried about their skill level in this regard are encouraged to contact Per Anders Kaestner directly (anders.kaestner@psi.ch).

More advanced students who are familiar with Python, C++, (or in some cases Java) will have to opportunity to develop more of their own tools.
529-0191-01LElectrochemical Energy Conversion and Storage TechnologiesW4 credits3GL. Gubler, E. Fabbri, J. Herranz Salañer
AbstractThe course provides an introduction to the principles and applications of electrochemical energy conversion (e.g. fuel cells) and storage (e.g. batteries) technologies in the broader context of a renewable energy system.
ObjectiveStudents will discover the importance of electrochemical energy conversion and storage in energy systems of today and the future, specifically in the framework of renewable energy scenarios. Basics and key features of electrochemical devices will be discussed, and applications in the context of the overall energy system will be highlighted with focus on future mobility technologies and grid-scale energy storage. Finally, the role of (electro)chemical processes in power-to-X and deep decarbonization concepts will be elaborated.
ContentOverview of energy utilization: past, present and future, globally and locally; today’s and future challenges for the energy system; climate changes; renewable energy scenarios; introduction to electrochemistry; electrochemical devices, basics and their applications: batteries, fuel cells, electrolyzers, flow batteries, supercapacitors, chemical energy carriers: hydrogen & synthetic natural gas; electromobility; grid-scale energy storage, power-to-gas, power-to-X and deep decarbonization, techno-economics and life cycle analysis.
Lecture notesall lecture materials will be available for download on the course website.
Literature- M. Sterner, I. Stadler (Eds.): Handbook of Energy Storage (Springer, 2019).
- C.H. Hamann, A. Hamnett, W. Vielstich; Electrochemistry, Wiley-VCH (2007).
- T.F. Fuller, J.N. Harb: Electrochemical Engineering, Wiley (2018)
Prerequisites / NoticeBasic physical chemistry background required, prior knowledge of electrochemistry basics desired.
529-0633-00LHeterogeneous Reaction EngineeringW4 credits3GJ. Pérez-Ramírez, C. Mondelli
AbstractHeterogeneous Reaction Engineering equips students with tools essential for the optimal development of heterogeneous processes. Integrating concepts from chemical engineering and chemistry, students will be introduced to the fundamental principles of heterogeneous reactions and will develop the necessary skills for the selection and design of various types of idealized reactors.
ObjectiveAt the end of the course the students will understand the basic principles of catalyzed and uncatalyzed heterogeneous reactions. They will know models to represent fluid-fluid and fluid-solid reactions; how to describe the kinetics of surface reactions; how to evaluate mass and heat transfer phenomena and account for their impact on catalyst effectiveness; the principle causes of catalyst deactivation; and reactor systems and protocols for catalyst testing.
ContentThe following components are covered:
- Fluid-fluid and fluid-solid heterogeneous reactions.
- Kinetics of surface reactions.
- Mass and heat transport phenomena.
- Catalyst effectiveness.
- Catalyst deactivation.
- Strategies for catalyst testing.

These aspects are exemplified through modern examples.
For each core topic exercises are assigned and evaluated.
The course also features an industrial lecture.
Lecture notesA dedicated script and lecture slides are available in printed form during the course.
LiteratureH. Scott Fogler: Elements of Chemical Reaction Engineering, Prentice Hall, New Jersey, 1992

O. Levenspiel: Chemical Reaction Engineering, 3rd edition, John Wiley & Sons, New Jersey, 1999

Further relevant sources are given during the course.
636-0111-00LSynthetic Biology I
Attention: This course was offered in previous semesters with the number: 636-0002-00L "Synthetic Biology I". Students that already passed course 636-0002-00L cannot receive credits for course 636-0111-00L.
W4 credits3GS. Panke, J. Stelling
AbstractTheoretical & practical introduction into the design of dynamic biological systems at different levels of abstraction, ranging from biological fundamentals of systems design (introduction to bacterial gene regulation, elements of transcriptional & translational control, advanced genetic engineering) to engineering design principles (standards, abstractions) mathematical modelling & systems desig
ObjectiveAfter the course, students will be able to theoretically master the biological and engineering fundamentals required for biological design to be able to participate in the international iGEM competition (see www.igem.ethz.ch).
ContentThe overall goal of the course is to familiarize the students with the potential, the requirements and the problems of designing dynamic biological elements that are of central importance for manipulating biological systems, primarily (but not exclusively) prokaryotic systems. Next, the students will be taken through a number of successful examples of biological design, such as toggle switches, pulse generators, and oscillating systems, and apply the biological and engineering fundamentals to these examples, so that they get hands-on experience on how to integrate the various disciplines on their way to designing biological systems.
Lecture notesHandouts during classes.
LiteratureMark Ptashne, A Genetic Switch (3rd ed), Cold Spring Haror Laboratory Press
Uri Alon, An Introduction to Systems Biology, Chapman & Hall
Prerequisites / Notice1) Though we do not place a formal requirement for previous participation in particular courses, we expect all participants to be familiar with a certain level of biology and of mathematics. Specifically, there will be material for self study available on https://bsse.ethz.ch/bpl/education/lectures/synthetic-biology-i/download.html as of mid January, and everybody is expected to be fully familiar with this material BEFORE THE CLASS BEGINS to be able to follow the different lectures. Please contact sven.panke@bsse.ethz.ch for access to material
2) The course is also thought as a preparation for the participation in the international iGEM synthetic biology summer competition (www.syntheticbiology.ethz.ch, http://www.igem.org). This competition is also the contents of the course Synthetic Biology II. https://bsse.ethz.ch/bpl/education/lectures/synthetic-biology-i/download.html
Multidisciplinary Courses
The students are free to choose individually from the Course Catalogue of ETH Zurich, ETH Lausanne and the Universities of Zurich and St. Gallen.
» Course Catalogue of ETH Zurich
Semester Project
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
151-1008-00LSemester Project Process Engineering Restricted registration - show details
Only for Process Engineering MSc.

The subject of the Master Thesis and the choice of the supervisor (ETH-professor) are to be approved in advance by the tutor.
O8 credits18AProfessors
AbstractThe semester project is designed to train the students in the solution of specific engineering problems. This makes use of the technical and social skills acquired during the master's program. Tutors propose the subject of the project, elaborate the project plan, and define the roadmap together with their students, as well as monitor the overall execution.
ObjectiveThe semester project is designed to train the students in the solution of specific engineering problems. This makes use of the technical and social skills acquired during the master's program.
Industrial Internship
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
151-1090-00LIndustrial Internship
Access to the company list and request for recognition under www.mavt.ethz.ch/praxis.

No registration required via myStudies.
O8 creditsexternal organisers
AbstractThe main objective of the minimum twelve-week internship is to expose Master’s students to the industrial work environment. The aim of the Industrial Internship is to apply engineering knowledge to practical situations.
ObjectiveThe aim of the Industrial Internship is to apply engineering knowledge to practical situations.
GESS Science in Perspective
» see Science in Perspective: Type A: Enhancement of Reflection Capability
» Recommended Science in Perspective (Type B) for D-MAVT
» see Science in Perspective: Language Courses ETH/UZH
Master's Thesis
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
151-1005-00LMaster's Thesis Process Engineering Restricted registration - show details
Students who fulfill the following criteria are allowed to begin with their Master's Thesis:
a. successful completion of the bachelor program;
b. fulfilling of any additional requirements necessary to gain admission to the master programme;
c. successful completion of the semester project and industrial internship;
d. achievement of 28 ECTS in the category "Core Courses".

The Master's Thesis must be approved in advance by the tutor and is supervised by a professor of ETH Zurich.
To choose a titular professor as a supervisor, please contact the D-MAVT Student Administration.
O30 credits64DProfessors
AbstractMaster's programs are concluded by the master's thesis. The thesis is aimed at enhancing the student's capability to work independently toward the solution of a theoretical or applied problem. The subject of the master's thesis, as well as the project plan and roadmap, are proposed by the tutor and further elaborated with the student.
ObjectiveThe thesis is aimed at enhancing the student's capability to work independently toward the solution of a theoretical or applied problem.
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