Search result: Catalogue data in Autumn Semester 2019

GESS Science in Perspective Information
Only the topics listed in this paragraph can be chosen as GESS Science in Perspective.
Further below you will find the "type B courses Reflections about subject specific methods and content" as well as the language courses.

6 ECTS need to be acquired during the BA and 2 ECTS during the MA

Students who already took a course within their main study program are NOT allowed to take the course again.
Type A: Enhancement of Reflection Competence
Suitable for all students.

Students who already took a course within their main study program are NOT allowed to take the course again.
Political Science
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
851-0589-00LTechnology and Innovation for DevelopmentW Dr3 credits2VP. Aerni
AbstractTechnological change plays a crucial role in efforts to create a more sustainable future. In this context, policy decision makers must design rules that minimize its risks and maximize its benefits for society at large. The course discusses this challenge from an interdisciplinary perspective taking into account legal, economic, historical, development and environmental aspects..
Objective- to recognize the challenges and opportunities of technological change in terms of sustainable development
- to become familiar with policy instruments to promote innovation
- to improve understanding of political decision-making processes in the regulation of science & technology
- improved understanding of the role of science and technology in the context of human and societal development
ContentScience and Technology Policy is normally associated with the improvement of national competitiveness; yet, it is also an integral part of effective environmental and development policies.
The course will discuss the challenges and opportunities of technological change in terms of sustainable development and show how public policy on the national and the international level is responding to this change.

In this context, students are to become familiar with the basic principles of political economy and New Growth Theory and how such theories help explain political decisions as well as political outcomes in the area of Science, Technology and Innovation. State interventions are either designed to regulate (e.g. environmental regulations, anti-trust law) or facilitate (e.g. intellectual property rights protection, public investment in R&D and technical education, technology transfer) technological change. This will be illustrated by looking at different industries and different national systems of innovation. Subsequently the positive and negative consequences for society and the natural environment will be discussed from a short-term and a long-term perspective.
Lecture notesReader with issue-specific articles. E-version is partly available under
Link
LiteratureAerni, P. 2017. ‘Principled Embeddedness’: How Foreign Direct Investment May Contribute To Inclusive And Sustainable Growth In Developing Economies. ATDF Journal 9(1/2), 3-19
Aerni, P. 2016a. Coping with Migration-Induced Urban Growth: Addressing the Blind Spot of UN Habitat. Sustainability 8(800), doi:10.3390/su8080800
Aerni, P. 2016b. The importance of public-private partnerships in the provision of global public goods. An academic view. In: Swiss Investment for a Better World, Swiss Sustainable Finance.
Aerni, P., Gagalac, F., Scholderer, J. 2016. The role of biotechnology in combating climate change: A question of politics. Science and Public Policy (43): 13–28.
Aerni, P. 2015a. Entrepreneurial Rights as Human Rights. Banson, Cambridge (June 2015) (available online: http://www.ourplanet.com/rights/index.php)
Aerni, P. 2015b. The Sustainable Provision of Environmental Services: From Regulation to Innovation. Springer, Heidelberg.
Aerni, P. 2013. Resistance to agricultural biotechnology: the importance of distinguishing between weak and strong public attitudes. Biotechnology Journal 8 (10): 1129–1132.
Aerni, Philipp. 2007. Exploring the Linkages between Commerce, Higher Education and Human Development: A Historical Review. ATDF Journal 4(2): 35-47.
Aerni, Philipp. 2004. Risk, Regulation and Innovation: The Case of Aquaculture and Transgenic Fish. Aquatic Sciences 66: 327-341.
Arthur, Brian. 2009. The Nature of Technology. New York: Free Press.
Carr, N. 2008. The Big Switch. Rewiring the World from Edison to Google. W. W. Norton & Company, New York.
Desai. M. (2003) Public Goods: A Historical Perspective. In Kaul, I., Conceicao, P., Le Goulven, K. and Mendoza, R.U. eds., 2003. Providing global public goods: managing globalization. Oxford University Press.
Diamond, Jared. 1999. Guns, Germs and Steel. New York: Norton.
Fraiberg, S. 2017. Start-up nation: Studying transnational entrepreneurial practices in Israel’s start-up ecosystem. Journal of Business and Technical Communication, 31(3), 350-388.
Hahn, R. W. and Sunstein, C. 2005. The Precautionary Principle as a Basis for Decision Making. The Economist’s Voice 2(2): 1-9
Heal, J.. 1999. New Strategies for the Provision of Global Public Goods. In: Kaul, Inge, Grunberg, Isabelle, and Marc A. Stern (eds) Global Public Goods. International Cooperation in the 21th century. Published for the United Nations Development Program. New York, Oxford University Press: 220-239
Hidalgo, C. 2015. When information grows. Basic Books.
Jacobs, J. 1969. The Economy of Cities. Vintage Books.
Kaplan, R. S., Serafeim, G., Tugendhat, E. (2018). Inclusive Growth: Profitable Strategies for Tackling Poverty and Inequality. Harvard Business Review, 96(1), 127-133.
Malakoff, D. 2011. Are More People Necessarily a Problem? Science 29 (333): 544-546
Malerba, Franco, and Luigi Orsenigo. 2015 The evolution of the pharmaceutical industry. Business History 57.5 (2015): 664-687.
Mazzucato, M. (2016). From market fixing to market-creating: a new framework for innovation policy. Industry and Innovation, 23(2), 140-156.
Mokyr, J. (2016). A culture of growth: the origins of the modern economy. Princeton University Press.
Roa, C., Hamilton, R.S., Wenzl, P. and Powell, W., 2016. Plant Genetic Resources: Needs, Rights, and Opportunities. Trends in Plant Science, 21(8), pp.633-636.
Romer, Paul. 1994. New Goods, Old Theory and the Welfare Costs of Trade Restrictions. Journal of Development Economics 43 (1): 5-38.
Schumpeter, Joseph A. 1942. Capitalism, Socialism and Democracy. New York, Harper Collins Publishers.
The Economist. 2014. Biodiversity Report. September, 2013: 1-14
Wang, F. & Matsuoka, M. (2018) A new green revolution on the horizon. Nature Magazine 360: 563-4.
Ziegler, N., Gassmann, O. and Friesike, S. 2014. Why do firms give away their patents for free? World Patent Information 37: 19–25
.
Prerequisites / NoticeThe 2-hour course (5-7 p.m.) will be held as a series of lectures. The course materials will be available in form of an electronic Reader at the beginning of the semester.
The class will be taught in English.
Students will be asked to make a contribution in class choosing one out of three options:
(a) presentation in class (15 Minutes) based on a paper to be discussed on a particular day in class
(b) review paper based on a selected publication in the course material
(c) preparation of questions for a selected invited speaker, and subsequent submission of protocol about the content of the talk and the discussion

In addition, they will have to pass a written test at the end of the course in order to obtain 3 credit points in the ECTS System. In the final mark (a) will have a weight of 40% and (b) 60%.
853-0038-00LSwiss Foreign PolicyW3 credits2VD. Möckli
AbstractThis course analyzes the foundations and challenges of Swiss foreign policy. After reviewing the history of foreign policy conceptions since the early 20th century, we will discuss the determining factors of Swiss foreign policy and examine, together with guest speakers from the foreign ministry, current international developments and respective foreign policy challenges.
ObjectiveStudents should acquire a sound understanding of Swiss foreign policy and the relevant academic and political debates associated with it.
ContentNach einer Einführung in die Aussenpolitikanalyse behandelt die Lehrveranstaltung zunächst die historischen Grundlagen und die konzeptionelle Entwicklung der schweizerischen Aussenpolitik. Dabei stehen die unterschiedlichen Reaktionen der Schweiz auf die internationalen Neuordnungen nach 1918, 1945 und 1989 und die seitherige Ausgestaltung der Schweizer Aussenpolitik im Zentrum. Es wird auch darum gehen, zentrale Determinanten der Schweizer Aussenpolitik zu identifizieren.
Auf dieser Basis werden wir die derzeitigen weltpolitischen Entwicklungslinien und deren Bedeutung für die Schweiz analysieren. Zu den aussenpolitischen Herausforderungen und Themen, die wir diskutieren, gehören die Krise der liberalen internationalen Ordnung (Autoritarismus und Populismus), die Konflikte im Nahen und Mittleren Osten, Fragen der europäischen Sicherheit, die Guten Dienste der Schweiz, die Entwicklungszusammenarbeit, die Migrationsaussenpolitik, das Engagement der Schweiz gegen den Terrorismus, die Europapolitik und Brexit sowie die Schweizer UNO-Politik und die Kanddiatur für den Sicherheitsrat.
Die erste Stunde wird in der Regel als Vorlesung des Dozenten bestritten. In der zweiten Stunde vertiefen wir Themen teilweise durch den Einbezug von Gastreferaten von Mitarbeitenden des Eidgenössischen Departements für auswärtige Angelegenheiten (EDA).
Lecture notesStudents will receive a handout of slides accompanying the lectures.
LiteratureA reading list will be handed out at the beginning of the semester.
Prerequisites / NoticeThe course will be supported by an e-learning environment.
853-0047-01LWorld Politics Since 1945: The History of International Relations (Without Exercises)W3 credits2VA. Wenger
AbstractThis lecture series provides students with an overview of the development of international relations since the end of World War II. The first part of the series deals with the development of and changes in Cold War security policy structures. The second part deals with the period after the transformation of 1989/91; the focus here is on current issues in international security policy.
ObjectiveBy the end of the semester, participants should have a solid knowledge of the history and theoretical foundations of International Relations since the end of the Second World War.
Contentcf. "Diploma Supplement"
LiteratureReading:

Wenger, Andreas und Doron Zimmermann. International Relations: From the Cold War to the Globalized World. Boulder: Lynne Rienner, 2003.
Prerequisites / NoticeThe lecure is being supported by a website on Moodle. If you have any questions, please contact Julia Hofstetter or Boas Lieberherr (julia.hofstetter@sipo.gess.ethz.ch, boas.lieberherr@sipo.gess.ethz.ch)
853-0015-01LConflict Research I: Political Violence Information Restricted registration - show details W3 credits2VS. Rüegger
AbstractIntroduction to research on political violence in domestic and international politics. This course covers the causes and solutions to different types of political violence including interstate wars, civil wars, terrorism or social protests.
ObjectiveKnowledge on different types of political violence and their causes.
ContentThis course offers an introduction to research on the causes and solutions to political violence in domestic and international politics. First, we discuss the definitions and concepts used in conflict research, the data and methods commonly applied and their historical development. Second, we focus on interstate wars und examine in this context state formation, nationalism and democracy. The third part of the course focuses on different types of political violence, including civil war, terrorism or social protests.
Prerequisites / NoticeThe course «Conflict Research II» in the following semester further examines civil wars.
853-0302-01LEuropean Integration (Seminar without Tutorial)W2 credits2SF. Schimmelfennig
AbstractThe lecture course covers the theory, development, and core policy fields of European integration as well as structures and processes of the EU as a decision- and policy-making system.
ObjectiveThe seminar is designed to help students understand the European Union as a particular kind of political system that differs both from the nation-state and from other international organizations. It imparts basic knowledge on the development, institutions, procedures, and policies of the EU and provides an introduction to major approaches to integration theory and political science research on the EU.
Content1. Introduction
2. Theories of European integration
3. Institutional development of European integration
4. Development of political integration
5. Internal market and monetary union
6. Internal and external security policies
7. Constitutionalization
8. Widening and differentiation
9. European integration in crisis
10. Institutions
11. Law-making and law enforcement
12. Statehood and democracy
13. Switzerland, the EEA and Neighbourhood Policies
Lecture notesThe seminar covers the theory, development, and core policy fields of European integration as well as structures and processes of the EU as a decision- and policy-making system.
LiteratureDie Literatur wird auf Moodle bereitgestellt.
Prerequisites / NoticeThe grade is based on a written exam.
860-0023-00LInternational Environmental Politics
Particularly suitable for students of D-ITET, D-USYS
W3 credits2VT. Bernauer
AbstractThis course focuses on the conditions under which cooperation in international environmental politics emerges and the conditions under which such cooperation and the respective public policies are effective and/or efficient.
ObjectiveThe objectives of this course are to (1) gain an overview of relevant questions in the area of international environmental politics from a social sciences viewpoint; (2) learn how to identify interesting/innovative questions concerning this policy area and how to answer them in a methodologically sophisticated way; (3) gain an overview of important global and regional environmental problems and how they could be solved.
ContentThis course deals with how and why international cooperation in environmental politics emerges, and under what circumstances such cooperation is effective and efficient. Based on theories of international political economy and theories of government regulation various examples of international environmental politics are discussed: the management of international water resources, political responses to global warming, the protection of the stratospheric ozone layer, the reduction of long-range transboundary air pollution in Europe, protection of biodiversity, how to deal with plastic waste, the prevention of pollution of the oceans, etc.

The course is open to all ETH students. Participation does not require previous coursework in the social sciences.

After passing an end-of-semester test (requirement: grade 4.0 or higher) students will receive 3 ECTS credit points. The workload is around 90 hours (meetings, reading assignments, preparation of test).

Visiting students (e.g., from the University of Zurich) are subject to the same conditions. Registration of visiting students in the web-based system of ETH is compulsory.
Lecture notesAssigned reading materials and slides will be available at http://www.ib.ethz.ch/teaching.html (select link 'Registered students, please click here for course materials' at top of that page) when the course starts. Log in with your nethz name and password. Questions concerning access to course materials can be addressed to Nicolas Solenthaler at: nicolas.solenthaler@gess.ethz.ch. All assigned papers must be read ahead of the respective meeting. Following the course on the basis of on-line slides and papers alone is not sufficient. Physical presence in the classroom is essential. Many books and journals covering international environmental policy issues can be found at the D-GESS library at the IFW building, Haldeneggsteig 4, B-floor, or in the library of D-USYS.
LiteratureAssigned reading materials and slides will be available at http://www.ib.ethz.ch/teaching.html (select link -Registered students, please click here for course materials- at top of that page). Log in with your nethz name and password. Questions concerning access to course materials can be addressed to Nicolas Solenthaler at: nicolas.solenthaler@gess.ethz.ch.
Prerequisites / NoticeNone
860-0001-00LPublic Institutions and Policy-Making Processes Restricted registration - show details
Does not take place this semester.
Number of participants limited to 25.

Priority for MSc Science, Technology, and Policy.
W3 credits3GT. Bernauer, S. Bechtold, F. Schimmelfennig
AbstractStudents acquire the contextual knowledge for analyzing public policies. They learn why and how public policies and laws are developed, designed, and implemented at national and international levels, and what challenges arise in this regard.
ObjectivePublic policies result from decision-making processes that take place within formal institutions of the state (parliament, government, public administration, courts). That is, policies are shaped by the characteristics of decision-making processes and the characteristics of public institutions and related actors (e.g. interest groups). In this course, students acquire the contextual knowledge for analyzing public policies. They learn why and how public policies and laws are developed, designed, and implemented at national and international levels, and what challenges arise in this regard. The course is organized in three modules. The first module (Stefan Bechtold) examines basic concepts and the role of law, law-making, and law enforcement in modern societies. The second module (Thomas Bernauer) deals with the functioning of legislatures, governments, and interest groups. The third module (Frank Schimmelfennig) focuses on the European Union and international organisations.
ContentPublic policies result from decision-making processes that take place within formal institutions of the state (parliament, government, public administration, courts). That is, policies are shaped by the characteristics of decision-making processes and the characteristics of public institutions and related actors (e.g. interest groups). In this course, students acquire the contextual knowledge for analyzing public policies. They learn why and how public policies and laws are developed, designed, and implemented at national and international levels, and what challenges arise in this regard. The course is organized in three modules. The first module (Stefan Bechtold) examines basic concepts and the role of law, law-making, and law enforcement in modern societies. The second module (Thomas Bernauer) deals with the functioning of legislatures, governments, and interest groups. The third module (Frank Schimmelfennig) focuses on the European Union and international organisations.
Lecture notesReading materials will be distributed electronically to the students when the semester starts.
LiteratureBaylis, John, Steve Smith, and Patricia Owens (2014): The Globalization of World Politics. An Introduction to International Relations. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Caramani, Daniele (ed.) (2014): Comparative Politics. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Gilardi, Fabrizio (2012): Transnational Diffusion: Norms, Ideas, and Policies, in Carlsnaes, Walter, Thomas Risse and Beth Simmons, Handbook of International Relations, 2nd Edition, London: Sage, pp. 453-477.

Hage, Jaap and Bram Akkermans (eds.) (2nd edition 2017): Introduction to Law, Heidelberg: Springer.

Jolls, Christine (2013): Product Warnings, Debiasing, and Free Speech: The Case of Tobacco Regulation, Journal of Institutional and Theoretical Economics 169: 53-78.

Lelieveldt, Herman and Sebastiaan Princen (2011): The Politics of European Union. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Lessig, Lawrence (2006): Code and Other Laws of Cyberspace, Version 2.0, New York: Basic Books. Available at http://codev2.cc/download+remix/Lessig-Codev2.pdf.

Schimmelfennig, Frank and Ulrich Sedelmeier (2004): Governance by Conditionality: EU Rule Transfer to the Candidate Countries of Central and Eastern Europe, in: Journal of European Public Policy 11(4): 669-687.

Shipan, Charles V. and Craig Volden (2012): Policy Diffusion: Seven Lessons for Scholars and Practitioners. Public Administration Review 72(6): 788-796.

Sunstein, Cass R. (2014): The Limits of Quantification, California Law Review 102: 1369-1422.

Thaler, Richard H. and Cass R. Sunstein (2003): Libertarian Paternalism. American Economic Review: Papers & Proceedings 93: 175-179.
Prerequisites / NoticeThis is a Master level course. The course is capped at 25 students, with ISTP Master students having priority.
363-1094-00LMathematics in Politics and LawW3 credits2VP. Grech
AbstractThis course intends to show the usefulness of mathematical reasoning in selected areas of politics and law. As such, it targets both students with a mathematical/science/engineering background as well as students of political science and law who are interested in interdisciplinary methods.
ObjectiveDevelop an understanding in which areas of politics and law and how specifically mathematical reasoning can be a helpful tool.
Apply specific procedures and methods, inspired by microeconomics and computer science, in voting situations and negotiations.
ContentThis course presents a selection of topics relevant to real-life elections as well as negotiations from a mathematical perspective, e.g.
- Voting systems (Is there a `good' voting scheme?)
- Apportionment theory (How can one reasonably apportion seats to representatives given a popular vote?)
- Voting power (Who is the most influencial? How should one define voting power?)
- Fairness (How do you fairly settle a negotiation over homogeneous/heterogeneous resources?)
- ...

Particular emphasis will be put on examples, such as
- US and Swiss elections (vote splitting, gerrymandering)
- EU Council
- Divorces, bequests
- Bilateral treaties
- CO2 negotiations
- Refugee distribution
- ...

The course consists of core lectures, exercise sessions, as well as two distinguished guest lectures that bridge theory and practice. Contact hours to discuss the student assignment and lecture content will also be announced.
Lecture notesA slide deck will be made available.
LiteratureA list of relevant references will be distributed in the beginning of the course.
Prerequisites / NoticeThe course does not require specific mathematical prerequisites. A flair/interest for mathematical reasoning is however important.
853-0061-00LIntroduction to Cybersecurity PoiticsW3 credits2GA. Wenger, M. Dunn Cavelty
AbstractThe lecture is an introduction to global cybersecurity politics. The focus is on the strategic use of cyberspace by state and non-state actors (threats) and different answers to these new challenges (countermeasures).
ObjectiveParticipants learn to assess the advantages and disadvantages of cyberspace as a domain for strategic military operations. They understand the technical basics of cyber operations and know how technology and politics are interlinked in this area. They understand the security challenges for and the motivations of states to be active in cyberspace offensively and defensively and they are familiar with the consequences for international politics.
ContentWe start with an overview of cybersecurity issue from 1980 to today and look at events and actors responsible for turning cybersecurity matters into a security political issue with top priority. After familiarizing ourselves with the technical basics, we look at different forms of cyberviolence and trends in cyber conflicts (technique in social and political practice). Then, we turn to countermeasures: we compare national cybersecurity strategies, examine international norms building, and scrutinize concepts such as cyber-power and cyber-deterrence (technique in social and political regulartory contexts).
Lecture notesA script with background information and comments on the literature will be made available at the beginning of the semester.
LiteratureLiterature for each session will be available on Moodle.
Prerequisites / NoticeThe lecture is being supported by a website on Moodle. If you have any questions, please contact Jasper Frei; jasper.frei@sipo.gess.ethz.ch.
853-8002-00LThe Role of Technology in National and International Security PolicyW3 credits2GA. Wenger, A. Dossi, M. Haas, M. Leese, O. Thränert
AbstractThe lecture gives an introduction to the role of security and military technologies in the formulation and implementation of national and international security policies. The focus is on challenges from new and emerging technologies, the change in military capacities, and the question of regulation.
ObjectiveParticipants gain an in-depth overview of the diverse areas in which technology becomes part of security policy and practices, both in civil and military contexts.
ContentDer erste Teil befasst sich mit den vielgestaltigen und komplexen Beziehungen zwischen Konzepten nationaler und internationaler Sicherheit, der Förderung von Forschung und Entwicklung, ökonomischen Aspekten von Technologie, und Aussenpolitik und Diplomatie. Der zweite Teil behandelt die Auswirkungen von neuen Technologien auf militärische Kapazitäten, strategische Optionen, und Militärdoktrinen in Krieg und Frieden. Der dritte Teil konzentriert sich auf regulatorische Herausforderungen, die aus der Implementierung und der globalen Weiterverbreitung von Technologie resultieren. Der letzte Teil schliesslich beschäftigt sich mit den Herausforderungen für den Staat im Umgang mit neuen und noch in der Entwicklung befindlicher Technologien, vorrangig in den sensiblen Bereich der Rüstungsbeschaffung und des nachrichtendienstlichen Einsatzes.
LiteratureLiteratur für die einzelnen Sitzungen wird auf Moodle bereitgestellt.
Prerequisites / NoticeThe lecture is being supported by a website on Moodle. If you have any questions, please contact Julia Hofstetter, julia.hofstetter@sipo.gess.ethz.ch.
851-0101-81LScience, Politics, Ideology: Mapping a Conflict Zone Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 30.
W3 credits2SM. Wulz
AbstractAs an 'objective' search for knowledge, science seems to be in sharp contrast to ideology. Or can we also find ideological forms of science – thus scientific knowledge under ideological conditions? Is 'ideology', in this case, a form of knowledge? And what is its role with regard to other forms of scientific knowledge?
ObjectiveIn the course, we will look at case studies and theoretical accounts in order to examine the conflict zone between science and ideology. We will develop methods in order to understand in which way 'ideological knowledge' can be analyzed in relation to science.
ContentThe relation of science and ideology has a long and controversial history. And even today this relation seems to be at stake, for example, when critics denounce climate change as an "ideological construct". In the course, we will look at case studies and in this way explore the conflict zone between ideological and scientific forms of knowledge. Based on theoretical approaches we will, moreover, develop methods in order to analyze the characteristics of ideological knowledge in relation to science.
363-1049-00LContemporary Conflict Management
Does not take place this semester.
The deadline for deregistering expires at the end of the second week of the semester. Students who are still registered after that date, but do not attend the exam, will officially fail the course.
W3 credits2V
AbstractThis course provides students with insights about the occurrence of conflicts on different levels of interaction, the many dimension of studying conflicts, and approaches of dealing with conflicts. Thereby, a special emphasis lies on the influence of natural sciences and technology on conflicts, conflict research, and conflict management.
ObjectiveDeveloping an understanding of conflicts, gaining insights in the scientific study of conflicts, and learning about the handling of conflicts in practice.
ContentThis course presents a selection of topics relevant to the occurrence of conflicts, conflict research, and conflict management. We will cover topics such as:

- Emergence of conflicts on different levels of society (international, business, private)
- Influence of new technologies on conflicts (e.g. online dispute, cyber conflicts, autonomous systems)
- Conflict research and its technical influences (e.g. modelling, simulations, big data)
- Concepts in theory and practice of conflict management

The course consists of core lectures and distinguished guest lectures that bridge theory and practice.
Lecture notesA slide deck will be made available.
LiteratureA list of relevant references will be distributed in the beginning of the course.
851-0101-65LRegional Politics of the Arabian Peninsula Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 30
W3 credits2VE. Manea
AbstractThe course examines how the internal power structures of selected arabian peninsula countries shape foreign policies and regional politics. It looks in particular at Saudi Arabia, Oman and Yemen in detail, from state formation to current affairs and from local to international government.
ObjectiveUnderstand the type of political systems prevalent on the Arabian peninsula, religious denominations, sectarian rivalry, and how these shape regional relations.
ContentThe neighbouring states of the Arabian Peninsula - especially Saudi Arabia, Oman and Yemen - make for strange bedfellows. They are governed by different systems with different results, calling into question how their internal policies affect regional relations and vice versa. Saudi Arabia is a monarchy, a prosperous, religious and restrictive state increasingly facing problems of social/political unrest. Oman is a small, thriving, stable sultanate, modernised and moderate but tightly controlled; and the republic of Yemen, which has the region's poorest economy, sunk into the mire of civil ear. Each state adheres to a different Islamic sect, moreover, and though their populations are overwhelmingly Arab, differing tribal structures result in widely variant effects on the political process in their respective systems. Each state has also had extensive historical relationships with the Ottoman and British empires, the US and Russia, and these too have colored regional relations. More recent events such as the terrorist attacks of 11 September 2001, the American-led invasion of Iraq, the Arab uprisings of 2011 and the on-going civil strife in Yemen have further affected their dealing with one another and with the world at large. This course examines each country in detail, from state formation to current affairs and from local to international government.
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