Search result: Catalogue data in Spring Semester 2018

Interdisciplinary Sciences Bachelor Information
Biochemical-Physical Direction
4. Semester (Biochemical-Physical Direction)
Electives
The Bachelor's programme in Interdisciplinary Sciences allows students to choose from any subject taught at a Bachelor level at ETH Zurich.

In consultation with the Director of Studies of Interdisciplinary Sciences, every student must establish his/her own individual study programme at the beginning of the 2nd year. See the Programme Regulations 2010 for further details.
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
529-0058-00LAnalytical Chemistry IIW3 credits3GD. Günther, T. Bucheli, M.‑O. Ebert, P. Lienemann, G. Schwarz
AbstractEnhanced knowledge about the elemental analysis and spectrocopical techniques with close relation to practical applications. This course is based on the knowledge from analytical chemistry I. Separation methods are included.
ObjectiveUse and applications of the elemental analysis and spectroscopical knowledge to solve relevant analytical problems.
ContentCombined application of spectroscopic methods for structure determination, and practical application of element analysis. More complex NMR methods: recording techniques, application of exchange phenomena, double resonance, spin-lattice relaxation, nuclear Overhauser effect, applications of experimental 2d and multipulse NMR spectroscopy, shift reagents. Application of chromatographic and electrophoretic separation methods: basics, working technique, quality assessment of a separation method, van-Deemter equation, gas chromatography, liquid chromatography (HPLC, ion chromatography, gel permeation, packing materials, gradient elution, retention index), electrophoresis, electroosmotic flow, zone electrophoresis, capillary electrophoresis, isoelectrical focussing, electrochromatography, 2d gel electrophoresis, SDS-PAGE, field flow fractionation, enhanced knowledge in atomic absorption spectroscopy, atomic emission spectroscopy, X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy, ICP-OES, ICP-MS.
Lecture notesScript will be available
LiteratureLiterature will be within the script.
Prerequisites / NoticeExercises for spectra interpretation are part of the lecture. In addition the lecture 529-0289-00 "Instrumentalanalyse organischer Verbindungen" (4th semester) is recommended.
Prerequisite: 529-0051-00 "Analytische Chemie I" (3rd semester)
401-1662-10LIntroduction to Numerical Methods Information W6 credits4G + 2UV. C. Gradinaru
AbstractThis course gives an introduction to numerical methods, aimed at physics majors. It covers numerical linear algebra, quadrature as well as initial vaule problems. The focus is on the ability to apply the numerical methods.
ObjectiveOverview on the most important algorithms for the solution of the fundamental numerical problems in Physics and applications;
overview on available software for the numerical solutions;
ability to solve concrete problems
ability to interpret numerical results
ContentLeast squares (linear and non-linear), nonlinear equations,
numerical quadrature, initial value problems.
Lecture notesNotes, slides and other relevant materials will be available via the web page of the lecture.
LiteratureRelevant materials will be available via the web page of the lecture.
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequisite is familiarity with basic calculus (approximation theory and vector calculus: grad, div, curl) and linear algebra (Gauss-elimination, matrix decompositions and algorithms, determinant)
401-1152-02LLinear Algebra IIW7 credits4V + 2UM. Akveld
AbstractEigenvalues and eigenvectors, Jordan normal form, bilinear forms, euclidean and unitary vector spaces, selected applications.
ObjectiveBasic knowledge of the fundamentals of linear algebra.
529-0440-00LPhysical Electrochemistry and ElectrocatalysisW6 credits3GT. Schmidt
AbstractFundamentals of electrochemistry, electrochemical electron transfer, electrochemical processes, electrochemical kinetics, electrocatalysis, surface electrochemistry, electrochemical energy conversion processes and introduction into the technologies (e.g., fuel cell, electrolysis), electrochemical methods (e.g., voltammetry, impedance spectroscopy), mass transport.
ObjectiveProviding an overview and in-depth understanding of Fundamentals of electrochemistry, electrochemical electron transfer, electrochemical processes, electrochemical kinetics, electrocatalysis, surface electrochemistry, electrochemical energy conversion processes (fuel cell, electrolysis), electrochemical methods and mass transport during electrochemical reactions. The students will learn about the importance of electrochemical kinetics and its relation to industrial electrochemical processes and in the energy seactor.
ContentReview of electrochemical thermodynamics, description electrochemical kinetics, Butler-Volmer equation, Tafel kinetics, simple electrochemical reactions, electron transfer, Marcus Theory, fundamentals of electrocatalysis, elementary reaction processes, rate-determining steps in electrochemical reactions, practical examples and applications specifically for electrochemical energy conversion processes, introduction to electrochemical methods, mass transport in electrochemical systems. Introduction to fuel cells and electrolysis
Lecture notesWill be handed out during the Semester
LiteraturePhysical Electrochemistry, E. Gileadi, Wiley VCH
Electrochemical Methods, A. Bard/L. Faulkner, Wiley-VCH
Modern Electrochemistry 2A - Fundamentals of Electrodics, J. Bockris, A. Reddy, M. Gamboa-Aldeco, Kluwer Academic/Plenum Publishers
701-0423-00LChemistry of Aquatic SystemsW3 credits2GL. Winkel
AbstractThis course gives an introduction to chemical processes in aquatic systems and shows applications to various systems. The following topics are treated: acid-base reactions and carbonate system, solubility of solids and weathering, redox reactions, complexation of metals, reactions at the solid/water interface, applications to lakes, rivers and groundwater.
ObjectiveUnderstanding of chemical processes in aquatic systems. Quantitative application of chemical equilibria to processes in natural waters. Evaluation of analytical data from aquatic systems.
ContentIntroduction to the chemistry of aquatic systems. Regulation of the composition of natural waters by chemical, geochemical and biological processes. Quantitative application of chemical equilibria to processes in natural waters. The following topics are treated: acid-base reactions, carbonate system; solubility of solid phases and weathering; complexation of metals and metal cycling in natural waters; redox reactions; reactions at the interface solid phase-water; applications to lakes, rivers, groundwater.
Lecture notesScript is distributed.
LiteratureSigg, L., Stumm, W., Aquatische Chemie, 5. Aufl., vdf/UTB, Zürich, 2011.
701-0401-00LHydrosphereW3 credits2VR. Kipfer, W. Aeschbach
AbstractQualitative and quantitative understanding of the physical processes that control the terrestrial water cycle. Energy and mass exchange, mixing and transport processes are described and the coupling of the hydrosphere with the atmosphere and the solid Earth are discussed.
ObjectiveQualitative and quantitative understanding of the physical processes that control the terrestrial water cycle. Energy and mass exchange, mixing and transport processes are described and the coupling of the hydrosphere with the atmosphere and the solid Earth are discussed.
ContentTopics of the course.
Physical properties of water (i.e. density and equation of state)
- global water resources
Exchange at boundaries
- energy (thermal & kinetic), gas exchange
Mixing and transport processes in open waters
- vertical stratification, large scale transport
- turbulence and mixing
- mixing and exchange processes in rivers
Groundwater and its dynamics
- ground water as part of the terrestrial water cycle
- ground water hydraulics, Darcy's law
- aquifers and their properties
- hydrochemistry and tracer
- ground water use
Case studies
- 1. Water as resource, 2. Water and climate
Lecture notesIn addition to the suggested literature handouts are distributed.
LiteratureSuggested literature.
a) Park, Ch., 2001, The Environment, Routledge, 2001
b) Price, M., 1996. Introducing groundwater. Chapman & Hall, London u.a.
Prerequisites / NoticeThe case studies and the analysis of the questions and problems are integral part of the course.
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