Search result: Catalogue data in Autumn Semester 2016

Biomedical Engineering Master Information
Track Courses
Bioelectronics
Track Core Courses
During the Master program, a minimum of 12 CP must be obtained from track core courses.
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
151-0604-00LMicrorobotics Information
Does not take place this semester.
W4 credits3GB. Nelson
AbstractMicrorobotics is an interdisciplinary field that combines aspects of robotics, micro and nanotechnology, biomedical engineering, and materials science. The aim of this course is to expose students to the fundamentals of this emerging field. Throughout the course students are expected to submit assignments. The course concludes with an end-of-semester examination.
ObjectiveThe objective of this course is to expose students to the fundamental aspects of the emerging field of microrobotics. This includes a focus on physical laws that predominate at the microscale, technologies for fabricating small devices, bio-inspired design, and applications of the field.
ContentMain topics of the course include:
- Scaling laws at micro/nano scales
- Electrostatics
- Electromagnetism
- Low Reynolds number flows
- Observation tools
- Materials and fabrication methods
- Applications of biomedical microrobots
Lecture notesThe powerpoint slides presented in the lectures will be made available in hardcopy and as pdf files. Several readings will also be made available electronically.
Prerequisites / NoticeThe lecture will be taught in English.
151-0605-00LNanosystemsW4 credits4GA. Stemmer, J.‑N. Tisserant
AbstractFrom atoms to molecules to condensed matter: characteristic properties of simple nanosystems and how they evolve when moving towards complex ensembles.
Intermolecular forces, their macroscopic manifestations, and ways to control such interactions.
Self-assembly and directed assembly of 2D and 3D structures.
Special emphasis on the emerging field of molecular electronic devices.
ObjectiveFamiliarize students with basic science and engineering principles governing the nano domain.
ContentThe course addresses basic science and engineering principles ruling the nano domain. We particularly work out the links between topics that are traditionally taught separately.

Special emphasis is placed on the emerging field of molecular electronic devices, their working principles, applications, and how they may be assembled.

Topics are treated in 2 blocks:

(I) From Quantum to Continuum
From atoms to molecules to condensed matter: characteristic properties of simple nanosystems and how they evolve when moving towards complex ensembles.

(II) Interaction Forces on the Micro and Nano Scale
Intermolecular forces, their macroscopic manifestations, and ways to control such interactions.
Self-assembly and directed assembly of 2D and 3D structures.
Literature- Kuhn, Hans; Försterling, H.D.: Principles of Physical Chemistry. Understanding Molecules, Molecular Assemblies, Supramolecular Machines. 1999, Wiley, ISBN: 0-471-95902-2
- Chen, Gang: Nanoscale Energy Transport and Conversion. 2005, Oxford University Press, ISBN: 978-0-19-515942-4
- Ouisse, Thierry: Electron Transport in Nanostructures and Mesoscopic Devices. 2008, Wiley, ISBN: 978-1-84821-050-9
- Wolf, Edward L.: Nanophysics and Nanotechnology. 2004, Wiley-VCH, ISBN: 3-527-40407-4

- Israelachvili, Jacob N.: Intermolecular and Surface Forces. 2nd ed., 1992, Academic Press,ISBN: 0-12-375181-0
- Evans, D.F.; Wennerstrom, H.: The Colloidal Domain. Where Physics, Chemistry, Biology, and Technology Meet. Advances in Interfacial Engineering Series. 2nd ed., 1999, Wiley, ISBN: 0-471-24247-0
- Hunter, Robert J.: Foundations of Colloid Science. 2nd ed., 2001, Oxford, ISBN: 0-19-850502-7
Prerequisites / NoticeCourse format:

Lectures and Mini-Review presentations: Thursday 10-13, ML F 36

Homework: Mini-Reviews
Students select a paper (list distributed in class) and expand the topic into a Mini-Review that illuminates the particular field beyond the immediate results reported in the paper.
151-0621-00LMicrosystems Technology Information W6 credits4GC. Hierold, M. Haluska
AbstractStudents are introduced to the basics of micromachining and silicon process technology and will learn about the fabrication of microsystems and -devices by a sequence of defined processing steps (process flow).
ObjectiveStudents are introduced to the basics of micromachining and silicon process technology and will understand the fabrication of microsystem devices by the combination of unit process steps ( = process flow).
Content- Introduction to microsystems technology (MST) and micro electro mechanical systems (MEMS)
- Basic silicon technologies: Thermal oxidation, photolithography and etching, diffusion and ion implantation, thin film deposition.
- Specific microsystems technologies: Bulk and surface micromachining, dry and wet etching, isotropic and anisotropic etching, beam and membrane formation, wafer bonding, thin film mechanical and thermal properties, piezoelectric and piezoresitive materials.
- Selected microsystems: Mechanical sensors and actuators, microresonators, thermal sensors and actuators, system integration and encapsulation.
Lecture notesHandouts (available online)
Literature- S.M. Sze: Semiconductor Devices, Physics and Technology
- W. Menz, J. Mohr, O.Paul: Microsystem Technology
- G. Kovacs: Micromachined Transducer Sourcebook
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequisites: Physics I and II
227-0385-10LBiomedical ImagingW6 credits5GS. Kozerke, K. P. Prüssmann, M. Rudin
AbstractIntroduction and analysis of medical imaging technology including X-ray procedures, computed tomography, nuclear imaging techniques using single photon and positron emission tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound imaging techniques.
ObjectiveTo understand the physical and technical principles underlying X-ray imaging, computed tomography, single photon and positron emission tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, ultrasound and Doppler imaging techniques. The mathematical framework is developed to describe image encoding/decoding, point-spread function/modular transfer function, signal-to-noise ratio, contrast behavior for each of the methods. Matlab exercises are used to implement and study basic concepts.
Content- X-ray imaging
- Computed tomography
- Single photon emission tomography
- Positron emission tomography
- Magnetic resonance imaging
- Ultrasound/Doppler imaging
Lecture notesLecture notes and handouts
LiteratureWebb A, Smith N.B. Introduction to Medical Imaging: Physics, Engineering and Clinical Applications; Cambridge University Press 2011
Prerequisites / NoticeAnalysis, Linear Algebra, Physics, Basics of Signal Theory, Basic skills in Matlab programming
227-0386-00LBiomedical Engineering Information W4 credits3GJ. Vörös, S. J. Ferguson, S. Kozerke, U. Moser, M. Rudin, M. P. Wolf, M. Zenobi-Wong
AbstractIntroduction into selected topics of biomedical engineering as well as their relationship with physics and physiology. The focus is on learning the concepts that govern common medical instruments and the most important organs from an engineering point of view. In addition, the most recent achievements and trends of the field of biomedical engineering are also outlined.
ObjectiveIntroduction into selected topics of biomedical engineering as well as their relationship with physics and physiology. The course provides an overview of the various topics of the different tracks of the biomedical engineering master course and helps orienting the students in selecting their specialized classes and project locations.
ContentIntroduction into neuro- and electrophysiology. Functional analysis of peripheral nerves, muscles, sensory organs and the central nervous system. Electrograms, evoked potentials. Audiometry, optometry. Functional electrostimulation: Cardiac pacemakers. Function of the heart and the circulatory system, transport and exchange of substances in the human body, pharmacokinetics. Endoscopy, medical television technology. Lithotripsy. Electrical Safety. Orthopaedic biomechanics. Lung function. Bioinformatics and Bioelectronics. Biomaterials. Biosensors. Microcirculation.Metabolism.
Practical and theoretical exercises in small groups in the laboratory.
Lecture notesIntroduction to Biomedical Engineering
by Enderle, Banchard, and Bronzino

AND

https://www1.ethz.ch/lbb/Education/BME
227-0393-10LBioelectronics and Biosensors
New course. Not to be confounded with 227-0393-00L last offered in the Spring Semester 2015.
W6 credits2V + 2UJ. Vörös, M. F. Yanik, T. Zambelli
AbstractThe course introduces the concepts of bioelectricity and biosensing. The sources and use of electrical fields and currents in the context of biological systems and problems are discussed. The fundamental challenges of measuring biological signals are introduced. The most important biosensing techniques and their physical concepts are introduced in a quantitative fashion.
ObjectiveDuring this course the students will:
- learn the basic concepts in biosensing and bioelectronics
- be able to solve typical problems in biosensing and bioelectronics
- learn about the remaining challenges in this field
ContentL1. Bioelectronics history, its applications and overview of the field
- Volta and Galvani dispute
- BMI, pacemaker, cochlear implant, retinal implant, limb replacement devices
- Fundamentals of biosensing
- Glucometer and ELISA

L2. Fundamentals of quantum and classical noise in measuring biological signals

L3. Biomeasurement techniques with photons

L4. Acoustics sensors
- Differential equation for quartz crystal resonance
- Acoustic sensors and their applications

L5. Engineering principles of optical probes for measuring and manipulating molecular and cellular processes

L6. Optical biosensors
- Differential equation for optical waveguides
- Optical sensors and their applications
- Plasmonic sensing

L7. Basic notions of molecular adsorption and electron transfer
- Quantum mechanics: Schrödinger equation energy levels from H atom to crystals, energy bands
- Electron transfer: Marcus theory, Gerischer theory

L8. Potentiometric sensors
- Fundamentals of the electrochemical cell at equilibrium (Nernst equation)
- Principles of operation of ion-selective electrodes

L9. Amperometric sensors and bioelectric potentials
- Fundamentals of the electrochemical cell with an applied overpotential to generate a faraday current
- Principles of operation of amperometric sensors
- Ion flow through a membrane (Fick equation, Nernst equation, Donnan equilibrium, Goldman equation)

L10. Channels, amplification, signal gating, and patch clamp Y4

L11. Action potentials and impulse propagation

L12. Functional electric stimulation and recording
- MEA and CMOS based recording
- Applying potential in liquid - simulation of fields and relevance to electric stimulation

L13. Neural networks memory and learning
LiteraturePlonsey and Barr, Bioelectricity: A Quantitative Approach (Third edition)
Prerequisites / NoticeSupervised exercises solving real-world problems. Some Matlab based exercises in groups.
227-0427-00LSignal and Information Processing: Modeling, Filtering, LearningW6 credits4GH.‑A. Loeliger
AbstractFundamentals in signal processing, detection/estimation, and machine learning.
I. Linear signal representation and approximation: Hilbert spaces, LMMSE estimation, regularization and sparsity.
II. Learning linear and nonlinear functions and filters: kernel methods, neural networks.
III. Structured statistical models: hidden Markov models, factor graphs, Kalman filter, parameter estimation.
ObjectiveThe course is an introduction to some basic topics in signal processing, detection/estimation theory, and machine learning.
ContentPart I - Linear Signal Representation and Approximation: Hilbert spaces, least squares and LMMSE estimation, projection and estimation by linear filtering, learning linear functions and filters, L2 regularization, L1 regularization and sparsity, singular-value decomposition and pseudo-inverse, principal-components analysis.
Part II - Learning Nonlinear Functions: fundamentals of learning, neural networks, kernel methods.
Part III - Structured Statistical Models and Message Passing Algorithms: hidden Markov models, factor graphs, Gaussian message passing, Kalman filter and recursive least squares, Monte Carlo methods, parameter estimation, expectation maximisation, sparse Bayesian learning.
Lecture notesLecture notes.
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequisites:
- local bachelors: course "Discrete-Time and Statistical Signal Processing" (5. Sem.)
- others: solid basics in linear algebra and probability theory
227-1037-00LIntroduction to Neuroinformatics Information W6 credits2V + 1UK. A. Martin, M. Cook, V. Mante, M. Pfeiffer
AbstractThe course provides an introduction to the functional properties of neurons. Particularly the description of membrane electrical properties (action potentials, channels), neuronal anatomy, synaptic structures, and neuronal networks. Simple models of computation, learning, and behavior will be explained. Some artificial systems (robot, chip) are presented.
ObjectiveUnderstanding computation by neurons and neuronal circuits is one of the great challenges of science. Many different disciplines can contribute their tools and concepts to solving mysteries of neural computation. The goal of this introductory course is to introduce the monocultures of physics, maths, computer science, engineering, biology, psychology, and even philosophy and history, to discover the enchantments and challenges that we all face in taking on this major 21st century problem and how each discipline can contribute to discovering solutions.
ContentThis course considers the structure and function of biological neural networks at different levels. The function of neural networks lies fundamentally in their wiring and in the electro-chemical properties of nerve cell membranes. Thus, the biological structure of the nerve cell needs to be understood if biologically-realistic models are to be constructed. These simpler models are used to estimate the electrical current flow through dendritic cables and explore how a more complex geometry of neurons influences this current flow. The active properties of nerves are studied to understand both sensory transduction and the generation and transmission of nerve impulses along axons. The concept of local neuronal circuits arises in the context of the rules governing the formation of nerve connections and topographic projections within the nervous system. Communication between neurons in the network can be thought of as information flow across synapses, which can be modified by experience. We need an understanding of the action of inhibitory and excitatory neurotransmitters and neuromodulators, so that the dynamics and logic of synapses can be interpreted. Finally, the neural architectures of feedforward and recurrent networks will be discussed in the context of co-ordination, control, and integration of sensory and motor information in neural networks.
376-1714-00LBiocompatible MaterialsW4 credits3GK. Maniura, J. Möller, M. Zenobi-Wong
AbstractIntroduction to molecules used for biomaterials, molecular interactions between different materials and biological systems (molecules, cells, tissues). The concept of biocompatibility is discussed and important techniques from biomaterials research and development are introduced.
ObjectiveThe class consists of three parts:
1. Introdcution into molecular characteristics of molecules involved in the materials-to-biology interface. Molecular design of biomaterials.
2. The concept of biocompatibility.
3. Introduction into methodology used in biomaterials research and application.
ContentIntroduction into native and polymeric biomaterials used for medical applications. The concepts of biocompatibility, biodegradation and the consequences of degradation products are discussed on the molecular level. Different classes of materials with respect to potential applications in tissue engineering and drug delivery are introduced. Strong focus lies on the molecular interactions between materials having very different bulk and/or surface chemistry with living cells, tissues and organs. In particular the interface between the materials surfaces and the eukaryotic cell surface and possible reactions of the cells with an implant material are elucidated. Techniques to design, produce and characterize materials in vitro as well as in vivo analysis of implanted and explanted materials are discussed.
In addition, a link between academic research and industrial entrepreneurship is established by external guest speakers.
Lecture notesHandouts can be accessed online.
LiteratureLiteratur
Biomaterials Science: An Introduction to Materials in Medicine, Ratner B.D. et al, 3rd Edition, 2013
Comprehensive Biomaterials, Ducheyne P. et al., 1st Edition, 2011

(available online via ETH library)

Handouts provided during the classes and references therin.
402-0674-00LPhysics in Medical Research: From Atoms to Cells Information W6 credits2V + 1UB. K. R. Müller
AbstractScanning probe and diffraction techniques allow studying activated atomic processes during early stages of epitaxial growth. For quantitative description, rate equation analysis, mean-field nucleation and scaling theories are applied on systems ranging from simple metallic to complex organic materials. The knowledge is expanded to optical and electronic properties as well as to proteins and cells.
ObjectiveThe lecture series is motivated by an overview covering the skin of the crystals, roughness analysis, contact angle measurements, protein absorption/activity and monocyte behaviour.

As the first step, real structures on clean surfaces including surface reconstructions and surface relaxations, defects in crystals are presented, before the preparation of clean metallic, semiconducting, oxidic and organic surfaces are introduced.

The atomic processes on surfaces are activated by the increase of the substrate temperature. They can be studied using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The combination with molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) allows determining the sizes of the critical nuclei and the other activated processes in a hierarchical fashion. The evolution of the surface morphology is characterized by the density and size distribution of the nanostructures that could be quantified by means of the rate equation analysis, the mean-field nucleation theory, as well as the scaling theory. The surface morphology is further characterized by defects and nanostructure's shapes, which are based on the strain relieving mechanisms and kinetic growth processes.

High-resolution electron diffraction is complementary to scanning probe techniques and provides exact mean values. Some phenomena are quantitatively described by the kinematic theory and perfectly understood by means of the Ewald construction. Other phenomena need to be described by the more complex dynamical theory. Electron diffraction is not only associated with elastic scattering but also inelastic excitation mechanisms that reflect the electronic structure of the surfaces studied. Low-energy electrons lead to phonon and high-energy electrons to plasmon excitations. Both effects are perfectly described by dipole and impact scattering.

Thin-films of rather complex organic materials are often quantitatively characterized by photons with a broad range of wavelengths from ultra-violet to infra-red light. Asymmetries and preferential orientations of the (anisotropic) molecules are verified using the optical dichroism and second harmonic generation measurements. These characterization techniques are vital for optimizing the preparation of medical implants and the determination of tissue's anisotropies within the human body.

Cell-surface interactions are related to the cell adhesion and the contractile cellular forces. Physical means have been developed to quantify these interactions. Other physical techniques are introduced in cell biology, namely to count and sort cells, to study cell proliferation and metabolism and to determine the relation between cell morphology and function.

3D scaffolds are important for tissue augmentation and engineering. Design, preparation methods, and characterization of these highly porous 3D microstructures are also presented.

Visiting clinical research in a leading university hospital will show the usefulness of the lecture series.
Recommended Elective Courses
These courses are particularly recommended for the Bioelectronics track. Please consult your track advisor if you wish to select other subjects.
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
227-0166-00LAnalog Integrated Circuits Information W6 credits2V + 2UQ. Huang
AbstractThis course provides a foundation in analog integrated circuit design based on bipolar and CMOS technologies.
ObjectiveIntegrated circuits are responsible for much of the progress in electronics in the last 50 years, particularly the revolutions in the Information and Communications Technologies we witnessed in recent years. Analog integrated circuits play a crucial part in the highly integrated systems that power the popular electronic devices we use daily. Understanding their design is beneficial to both future designers and users of such systems.
The basic elements, design issues and techniques for analog integrated circuits will be taught in this course.
ContentReview of bipolar and MOS devices and their small-signal equivalent circuit models; Building blocks in analog circuits such as current sources, active load, current mirrors, supply independent biasing etc; Amplifiers: differential amplifiers, cascode amplifier, high gain structures, output stages, gain bandwidth product of op-amps; Stability; Comparators; Second-order effects in analog circuits such as mismatch, noise and offset; A/D and D/A converters; Introduction to switched capacitor circuits.
The exercise sessions aim to reinforce the lecture material by well guided step-by-step design tasks. The circuit simulator SPECTRE is used to facilitate the tasks. There is also an experimental session on op-amp measurments.
Lecture notesHandouts of presented slides. No script but an accompanying textbook is recommended.
LiteratureGray, Hurst, Lewis, Meyer, "Analysis and Design of Analog Integrated Circuits", 5th Ed. Wiley, 2010.
227-0447-00LImage Analysis and Computer Vision Information W6 credits3V + 1UL. Van Gool, O. Göksel, E. Konukoglu
AbstractLight and perception. Digital image formation. Image enhancement and feature extraction. Unitary transformations. Color and texture. Image segmentation and deformable shape matching. Motion extraction and tracking. 3D data extraction. Invariant features. Specific object recognition and object class recognition.
ObjectiveOverview of the most important concepts of image formation, perception and analysis, and Computer Vision. Gaining own experience through practical computer and programming exercises.
ContentThe first part of the course starts off from an overview of existing and emerging applications that need computer vision. It shows that the realm of image processing is no longer restricted to the factory floor, but is entering several fields of our daily life. First it is investigated how the parameters of the electromagnetic waves are related to our perception. Also the interaction of light with matter is considered. The most important hardware components of technical vision systems, such as cameras, optical devices and illumination sources are discussed. The course then turns to the steps that are necessary to arrive at the discrete images that serve as input to algorithms. The next part describes necessary preprocessing steps of image analysis, that enhance image quality and/or detect specific features. Linear and non-linear filters are introduced for that purpose. The course will continue by analyzing procedures allowing to extract additional types of basic information from multiple images, with motion and depth as two important examples. The estimation of image velocities (optical flow) will get due attention and methods for object tracking will be presented. Several techniques are discussed to extract three-dimensional information about objects and scenes. Finally, approaches for the recognition of specific objects as well as object classes will be discussed and analyzed.
Lecture notesCourse material Script, computer demonstrations, exercises and problem solutions
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequisites:
Basic concepts of mathematical analysis and linear algebra. The computer exercises are based on Linux and C.
The course language is English.
227-0468-00LAnalog Signal Processing and Filtering Information
Suitable for Master Students as well as Doctoral Students.
W6 credits2V + 2UH. Schmid
AbstractThis lecture provides a wide overview over analog filters (continuous-time and discrete-time), signal-processing systems, and sigma-delta conversion, and gives examples with sensor interfaces and class-D audio drivers. All systems and circuits are treated using a signal-flow view. The lecture is suitable for both analog and digital designers.
ObjectiveThis lecture provides a wide overview over analog filters (continuous-time and discrete-time), signal-processing systems, and sigma-delta conversion, and gives examples with sensor interfaces and class-D audio drivers. All systems and circuits are treated using a signal-flow view. The lecture is suitable for both analog and digital designers. The way the exam is done allows for the different interests of the two groups.

The learning goal is that the students can apply signal-flow graphs and can understand the signal flow in such circuits and systems (including non-ideal effects) well enough to gain an understanding of further circuits and systems by themselves.
ContentAt the beginning, signal-flow graphs in general and driving-point signal-flow graphs in particular are introduced. We will use them during the whole term to analyze circuits and understand how signals propagate through them. The theory and CMOS implementation of active Filters is then discussed in detail using the example of Gm-C filters and active-RC filters. The ideal and nonideal behaviour of opamps, current conveyors, and inductor simulators follows. The link to the practical design of circuits and systems is done with an overview over different quality measures and figures of merit used in scientific literature and datasheets. Finally, an introduction to discrete-time and mixed-domain filters and circuits is given, including sensor read-out amplifiers, correlated double sampling, and chopping, and an introduction to sigma-delta A/D and D/A conversion on a system level.
Lecture notesThe base for these lectures are lecture notes and two or three published scientific papers. From these papers we will together develop the technical content.

Details: https://people.ee.ethz.ch/~haschmid/asfwiki/

Some material is protected by password; students from ETHZ who are interested can write to haschmid@ethz.ch to ask for the password even if they do not attend the lecture.
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequisites: Recommended (but not required): Stochastic models and signal processing, Communication Electronics, Analog Integrated Circuits, Transmission Lines and Filters.

Knowledge of the Laplace transform and z transform and their interpretation (transfer functions, poles and zeros, bode diagrams, stability criteria ...) and of the main properties of linear systems is necessary.
227-0981-00LCross-Disciplinary Research and Development in Medicine and Engineering Restricted registration - show details
A maximum of 12 medical degree students and 12 (biomedical) engineering degree students can be admitted, their number should be equal.
W4 credits2V + 2AV. Kurtcuoglu, D. de Julien de Zelicourt, M. Meboldt, M. Schmid Daners, O. Ullrich
AbstractCross-disciplinary collaboration between engineers and medical doctors is indispensable for innovation in health care. This course will bring together engineering students from ETH Zurich and medical students from the University of Zurich to experience the rewards and challenges of such interdisciplinary work in a project based learning environment.
ObjectiveThe main goal of this course is to demonstrate the differences in communication between the fields of medicine and engineering. Since such differences become the most evident during actual collaborative work, the course is based on a current project in physiology research that combines medicine and engineering. For the engineering students, the specific aims of the course are to:

- Acquire a working understanding of the anatomy and physiology of the investigated system;
- Identify the engineering challenges in the project and communicate them to the medical students;
- Develop and implement, together with the medical students, solution strategies for the identified challenges;
- Present the found solutions to a cross-disciplinary audience.
ContentAfter a general introduction to interdisciplinary communication and detailed background on the collaborative project, the engineering students will receive tailored lectures on the anatomy and physiology of the relevant system. They will then team up with medical students who have received a basic introduction to engineering methodology to collaborate on said project. In the process, they will be coached both by lecturers from ETH Zurich and the University of Zurich, receiving lectures customized to the project. The course will end with each team presenting their solution to a cross-disciplinary audience.
Lecture notesHandouts and relevant literature will be provided.
227-1033-00LNeuromorphic Engineering I Information Restricted registration - show details
Registration in this class requires the permission of the instructors. Class size will be limited to available lab spots.
Preference is given to students that require this class as part of their major.
W6 credits2V + 3UT. Delbrück, G. Indiveri, S.‑C. Liu
AbstractThis course covers analog circuits with emphasis on neuromorphic engineering: MOS transistors in CMOS technology, static circuits, dynamic circuits, systems (silicon neuron, silicon retina, silicon cochlea) with an introduction to multi-chip systems. The lectures are accompanied by weekly laboratory sessions.
ObjectiveUnderstanding of the characteristics of neuromorphic circuit elements.
ContentNeuromorphic circuits are inspired by the organizing principles of biological neural circuits. Their computational primitives are based on physics of semiconductor devices. Neuromorphic architectures often rely on collective computation in parallel networks. Adaptation, learning and memory are implemented locally within the individual computational elements. Transistors are often operated in weak inversion (below threshold), where they exhibit exponential I-V characteristics and low currents. These properties lead to the feasibility of high-density, low-power implementations of functions that are computationally intensive in other paradigms. Application domains of neuromorphic circuits include silicon retinas and cochleas for machine vision and audition, real-time emulations of networks of biological neurons, and the development of autonomous robotic systems. This course covers devices in CMOS technology (MOS transistor below and above threshold, floating-gate MOS transistor, phototransducers), static circuits (differential pair, current mirror, transconductance amplifiers, etc.), dynamic circuits (linear and nonlinear filters, adaptive circuits), systems (silicon neuron, silicon retina and cochlea) and an introduction to multi-chip systems that communicate events analogous to spikes. The lectures are accompanied by weekly laboratory sessions on the characterization of neuromorphic circuits, from elementary devices to systems.
LiteratureS.-C. Liu et al.: Analog VLSI Circuits and Principles; various publications.
Prerequisites / NoticeParticular: The course is highly recommended for those who intend to take the spring semester course 'Neuromorphic Engineering II', that teaches the conception, simulation, and physical layout of such circuits with chip design tools.

Prerequisites: Background in basics of semiconductor physics helpful, but not required.
227-2037-00LPhysical Modelling and Simulation Information W5 credits4GC. Hafner, J. Leuthold, J. Smajic
AbstractThis module consists of (a) an introduction to fundamental equations of electromagnetics, mechanics and heat transfer, (b) a detailed overview of numerical methods for field simulations, and (c) practical examples solved in form of small projects.
ObjectiveBasic knowledge of the fundamental equations and effects of electromagnetics, mechanics, and heat transfer. Knowledge of the main concepts of numerical methods for physical modelling and simulation. Ability (a) to develop own simple field simulation programs, (b) to select an appropriate field solver for a given problem, (c) to perform field simulations, (d) to evaluate the obtained results, and (e) to interactively improve the models until sufficiently accurate results are obtained.
ContentThe module begins with an introduction to the fundamental equations and effects of electromagnetics, mechanics, and heat transfer. After the introduction follows a detailed overview of the available numerical methods for solving electromagnetic, thermal and mechanical boundary value problems. This part of the course contains a general introduction into numerical methods, differential and integral forms, linear equation systems, Finite Difference Method (FDM), Boundary Element Method (BEM), Method of Moments (MoM), Multiple Multipole Program (MMP) and Finite Element Method (FEM). The theoretical part of the course finishes with a presentation of multiphysics simulations through several practical examples of HF-engineering such as coupled electromagnetic-mechanical and electromagnetic-thermal analysis of MEMS.
In the second part of the course the students will work in small groups on practical simulation problems. For solving practical problems the students can develop and use own simulation programs or chose an appropriate commercial field solver for their specific problem. This practical simulation work of the students is supervised by the lecturers.
151-0255-00LEnergy Conversion and Transport in BiosystemsW4 credits2V + 1UD. Poulikakos, A. Ferrari
AbstractTheory and application of thermodynamics and energy conversion in biological systems with focus on the cellular level.
ObjectiveTheory and application of energy conversion at the cellular level. Understanding of the basic features governing solutes transport in the principal systems of the human cell. Connection of characteristics and patterns from other fields of engineering to biofluidics. Heat and mass transport processes in the cell, generation of forces, work and relation to biomedical technologies.
ContentMass transfer models for the transport of chemical species in the human cell. Organization and function of the cell membrane and of the cell cytoskeleton. The role of molecular motors in cellular force generation and their function in cell migration. Description of the functionality of these systems and of analytical experimental and computational techniques for understanding of their operation. Introduction to cell metabolism, cellular energy transport and cellular thermodynamics.
Lecture notesMaterial in the form of hand-outs will be distributed.
LiteratureLecture notes and references therein.
151-0509-00LMicroscale Acoustofluidics Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 30.
W4 credits3GJ. Dual
AbstractIn this lecture the basics as well as practical aspects (from modelling to design and fabrication ) are described from a solid and fluid mechanics perspective with applications to microsystems and lab on a chip devices.
ObjectiveUnderstanding acoustophoresis, the design of devices and potential applications
ContentLinear and nonlinear acoustics, foundations of fluid and solid mechanics and piezoelectricity, Gorkov potential, numerical modelling, acoustic streaming, applications from ultrasonic microrobotics to surface acoustic wave devices
Lecture notesYes, incl. Chapters from the Tutorial: Microscale Acoustofluidics, T. Laurell and A. Lenshof, Ed., Royal Society of Chemistry, 2015
LiteratureMicroscale Acoustofluidics, T. Laurell and A. Lenshof, Ed., Royal Society of Chemistry, 2015
Prerequisites / NoticeSolid and fluid continuum mechanics. Notice: The exercise part is a mixture of presentation, lab session and hand in homework.
376-1103-00LFrontiers in NanotechnologyW4 credits4VV. Vogel, further lecturers
AbstractMany disciplines are meeting at the nanoscale, from physics, chemistry to engineering, from the life sciences to medicine. The course will prepare students to communicate more effectively across disciplinary boundaries, and will provide them with deep insights into the various frontiers.
ObjectiveBuilding upon advanced technologies to create, visualize, analyze and manipulate nano-structures, as well as to probe their nano-chemistry, nano-mechanics and other properties within manmade and living systems, many exciting discoveries are currently made. They change the way we do science and result in so many new technologies.

The goal of the course is to give Master and Graduate students from all interested departments an overview of what nanotechnology is all about, from analytical techniques to nanosystems, from physics to biology. Students will start to appreciate the extent to which scientific communities are meeting at the nanoscale. They will learn about the specific challenges and what is currently “sizzling” in the respective fields, and learn the vocabulary that is necessary to communicate effectively across departmental boundaries.

Each lecturer will first give an overview of the state-of-the art in his/her field, and then describe the research highlights in his/her own research group. While preparing their Final Projects and discussing them in front of the class, the students will deepen their understanding of how to apply a range of new technologies to solve specific scientific problems and technical challenges. Exposure to the different frontiers will also improve their ability to conduct effective nanoscale research, recognize the broader significance of their work and to start collaborations.
ContentStarting with the fabrication and analysis of nanoparticles and nanostructured materials that enable a variety of scientific and technical applications, we will transition to discussing biological nanosystems, how they work and what bioinspired engineering principles can be derived, to finally discussing biomedical applications and potential health risk issues. Scientific aspects as well as the many of the emerging technologies will be covered that start impacting so many aspects of our lives. This includes new phenomena in physics, advanced materials, novel technologies and new methods to address major medical challenges.
Lecture notesAll the enrolled students will get access to a password protected website where they can find pdf files of the lecture notes, and typically 1-2 journal articles per lecture that cover selected topics.
376-1219-00LRehabilitation Engineering II: Rehabilitation of Sensory and Vegetative FunctionsW3 credits2VR. Riener, R. Gassert, L. Marchal Crespo
AbstractRehabilitation Engng is the application of science and technology to ameliorate the handicaps of individuals with disabilities to reintegrate them into society.The goal is to present classical and new rehabilitation engineering principles applied to compensate or enhance motor, sensory, and cognitive deficits. Focus is on the restoration and treatment of the human sensory and vegetative system.
ObjectiveProvide knowledge on the anatomy and physiology of the human sensory system, related dysfunctions and pathologies, and how rehabilitation engineering can provide sensory restoration and substitution.

This lecture is independent from Rehabilitation Engineering I. Thus, both lectures can be visited in arbitrary order.
ContentIntroduction, problem definition, overview
Rehabilitation of visual function
- Anatomy and physiology of the visual sense
- Technical aids (glasses, sensor substitution)
- Retina and cortex implants
Rehabilitation of hearing function
- Anatomy and physiology of the auditory sense
- Hearing aids
- Cochlea Implants
Rehabilitation and use of kinesthetic and tactile function
- Anatomy and physiology of the kinesthetic and tactile sense
- Tactile/haptic displays for motion therapy (incl. electrical stimulation)
- Role of displays in motor learning
Rehabilitation of vestibular function
- Anatomy and physiology of the vestibular sense
- Rehabilitation strategies and devices (e.g. BrainPort)
Rehabilitation of vegetative Functions
- Cardiac Pacemaker
- Phrenic stimulation, artificial breathing aids
- Bladder stimulation, artificial sphincter
Brain stimulation and recording
- Deep brain stimulation for patients with Parkinson, epilepsy, depression
- Brain-Computer Interfaces
LiteratureIntroductory Books:

An Introduction to Rehabilitation Engineering. R. A. Cooper, H. Ohnabe, D. A. Hobson (Eds.). Taylor & Francis, 2007.

Principles of Neural Science. E. R. Kandel, J. H. Schwartz, T. M Jessell (Eds.). Mc Graw Hill, New York, 2000.

Force and Touch Feedback for Virtual Reality. G. C. Burdea (Ed.). Wiley, New York, 1996 (available on NEBIS).

Human Haptic Perception, Basics and Applications. M. Grunwald (Ed.). Birkhäuser, Basel, 2008.

The Sense of Touch and Its Rendering, Springer Tracts in Advanced Robotics 45, A. Bicchi et al.(Eds). Springer-Verlag Berlin, 2008.

Interaktive und autonome Systeme der Medizintechnik - Funktionswiederherstellung und Organersatz. Herausgeber: J. Werner, Oldenbourg Wissenschaftsverlag 2005.

Neural prostheses - replacing motor function after desease or disability. Eds.: R. Stein, H. Peckham, D. Popovic. New York and Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Advances in Rehabilitation Robotics - Human-Friendly Technologies on Movement Assistance and Restoration for People with Disabilities. Eds: Z.Z. Bien, D. Stefanov (Lecture Notes in Control and Information Science, No. 306). Springer Verlag Berlin 2004.

Intelligent Systems and Technologies in Rehabilitation Engineering. Eds: H.N.L. Teodorescu, L.C. Jain (International Series on Computational Intelligence). CRC Press Boca Raton, 2001.


Selected Journal Articles and Web Links:

Abbas, J., Riener, R. (2001) Using mathematical models and advanced control systems techniques to enhance neuroprosthesis function. Neuromodulation 4, pp. 187-195.

Bach-y-Rita P., Tyler M., and Kaczmarek K (2003). Seeing with the brain. International journal of human-computer-interaction, 15(2):285-295.

Burdea, G., Popescu, V., Hentz, V., and Colbert, K. (2000): Virtual reality-based orthopedic telerehabilitation, IEEE Trans. Rehab. Eng., 8, pp. 430-432
Colombo, G., Jörg, M., Schreier, R., Dietz, V. (2000) Treadmill training of paraplegic patients using a robotic orthosis. Journal of Rehabilitation Research and Development, vol. 37, pp. 693-700.

Hayward, V. (2008): A Brief Taxonomy of Tactile Illusions and
Demonstrations That Can Be Done In a Hardware Store. Brain Research Bulletin, Vol 75, No 6, pp 742-752

Krebs, H.I., Hogan, N., Aisen, M.L., Volpe, B.T. (1998): Robot-aided neurorehabilitation, IEEE Trans. Rehab. Eng., 6, pp. 75-87

Levesque. V. (2005). Blindness, technology and haptics. Technical report, McGill University. Available at: http://www.cim.mcgill.ca/~vleves/docs/VL-CIM-TR-05.08.pdf

Quintern, J. (1998) Application of functional electrical stimulation in paraplegic patients. NeuroRehabilitation 10, pp. 205-250.

Riener, R., Nef, T., Colombo, G. (2005) Robot-aided neurorehabilitation for the upper extremities. Medical & Biological Engineering & Computing 43(1), pp. 2-10.

Riener, R. (1999) Model-based development of neuroprostheses for paraplegic patients. Royal Philosophical Transactions: Biological Sciences 354, pp. 877-894.

The vOICe. http://www.seeingwithsound.com.

VideoTact, ForeThought Development, LLC. http://my.execpc.com/?dwysocki/videotac.html
Prerequisites / NoticeTarget Group:
Students of higher semesters and PhD students of
- D-MAVT, D-ITET, D-INFK, D-HEST
- Biomedical Engineering, Robotics, Systems and Control
- Medical Faculty, University of Zurich
Students of other departments, faculties, courses are also welcome
This lecture is independent from Rehabilitation Engineering I. Thus, both lectures can be visited in arbitrary order.
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