Search result: Catalogue data in Autumn Semester 2016

Physics Master Information
Core Courses
One Core Course in Experimental or Theoretical Physics from Physics Bachelor is eligible; however, this Core Course from Physics Bachelor cannot be used to compensate for the mandatory Core Course in Experimental or Theoretical Physics.
For the category assignment keep the choice "no category" and take contact with the Study Administration (www.phys.ethz.ch/studies/study-administration.html) after having received the credits.
Core Courses in Theoretical Physics
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
402-0861-00LStatistical PhysicsW10 credits4V + 2UG. Blatter
AbstractThis lecture covers the concepts of classical and quantum statistical physics, and some aspects of kinetic gas theory and hydrodynamics. In a more advanced part degenerate Fermions, Bose-Einstein condensation, real Bose gases, magnetism, general mean field theory and critical phenomena will be addressed.
ObjectiveThis lecture gives an introduction in the basic concepts and applications of statistical physics for the general use in physics and, in particular, as a preparation for the theoretical solid state physics education.
ContentBasics of phenomenological thermodynamics, three laws of thermodynamics.
Basics of kinetic gas theory: conservation laws, H-theorem, Boltzmann-Equations, Maxwell distribution.
Hydrodynamics.
Classical statistical physics: microcanonical ensembles, canonical ensembles and grandcanonical ensembles, applications to simple systems.
Quantum statistical physics: single particle, ideal quantum gases, fermions and bosons.
Degenerate fermions: Fermi gas, electrons in magnetic field.
Bosons: Bose-Einstein condensation, Bogoliubov theory, superfluidity.
Mean field and Landau theory: Ising-, XY-, Heisenberg models, Landau theory of phase transitions, fluctuations.
Critical phenomena: mean field, series expansions, scaling behavior, universality.
Renormalization group: fixed points, simple models.
Lecture notesLecture notes available in german.
LiteratureNo specific book is used for the course. Relevant literature will be given in the course.
402-0843-00LQuantum Field Theory I Information W10 credits4V + 2UC. Anastasiou
AbstractThis course discusses the quantisation of fields in order to introduce a coherent formalism for the combination of quantum mechanics and special relativity.
Topics include:
- Relativistic quantum mechanics
- Quantisation of bosonic and fermionic fields
- Interactions in perturbation theory
- Scattering processes and decays
- Radiative corrections
ObjectiveThe goal of this course is to provide a solid introduction to the formalism, the techniques, and important physical applications of quantum field theory. Furthermore it prepares students for the advanced course in quantum field theory (Quantum Field Theory II), and for work on research projects in theoretical physics, particle physics, and condensed-matter physics.
402-0830-00LGeneral Relativity Information W10 credits4V + 2UP. Jetzer
AbstractManifold, Riemannian metric, connection, curvature; Special Relativity; Lorentzian metric; Equivalence principle; Tidal force and spacetime curvature; Energy-momentum tensor, field equations, Newtonian limit; Post-Newtonian approximation; Schwarzschild solution; Mercury's perihelion precession, light deflection.
ObjectiveBasic understanding of general relativity, its mathematical foundations, and some of the interesting phenomena it predicts.
LiteratureSuggested textbooks:

C. Misner, K, Thorne and J. Wheeler: Gravitation
S. Carroll - Spacetime and Geometry: An Introduction to General
Relativity
R. Wald - General Relativity
S. Weinberg - Gravitation and Cosmology
N. Straumann - General Relativity with applications to Astrophysics
Core Courses: Experimental Physics
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
402-0257-00LAdvanced Solid State Physics Information W10 credits3V + 2UA. Zheludev
AbstractThis course is an extension of the introductory course on solid state physics.

The purpose of this course is to learn to navigate the complex collective quantum phases, excitations and phase transitions
that are the dominant theme in modern solid state physics. The emphasis is on the main concepts and on specific experimental
examples, both classic ones and those from recent research.
ObjectiveThe goal is to study how novel phenomena emerge in the solid state.
Content= Today's challenges and opportunities in Solid State Physics

= Phase transitions and critical phenomena
.Main concepts: coherence length, symmetry, order parameter, correlation functions, generalized susceptibility
.Bragg-Williams mean field theory
.Landau theory of phase transitions
.Fluctuations in Landau theory
.Critical exponents: significance, measurement, inequalities, equalities
.Scaling and hyperscaling
.Universality
.Critical dynamics
.Quantum phase transitions and quantum criticality

=Fermi surface instabilities
. The concept of the Landau Fermi liquid in metals
. Kohn anomalies
. Charge density waves
. Metallic ferromagnets and half-metals
. Spin density waves

=Magnetism of insulators
.Magnetic interactions in solids and the spin Hamiltonian
.Magnetic structures and phase transitions
.Spin waves
.Quantum magnetism

= Electron correlations in solids
. Mott insulating state
. Phases of the Hubbard model
. Layered cuprates (non-superconducting properties)
Lecture notesThe printed material for this course involves: (1) a self-contained script, distributed electronically at semester start. (2) experimental examples (Power Point slide-style) selected from original publications, distributed at the start of every lecture.
LiteratureA list of books will be distributed. Numerous references to useful published scientific papers will be provided.
Prerequisites / NoticeThis course is for students who like to be engaged in active learning. The "exercise classes" are organized in a non-traditional way: following the idea of "less is more", we will work on only about half a dozen topics, and this gives students a chance to take a look at original literature (provided), and to get the grasp of a topic from a broader perspective.

Students report back that this mode of "exercise class" is more satisfying than traditional modes, even if it does not mean less effort.
402-0442-00LQuantum OpticsW10 credits3V + 2UJ. Faist
AbstractThis course gives an introduction to the fundamental concepts of Quantum Optics and will highlight state-of-the-art developments in this rapidly evolving discipline. The topics covered include the quantum nature of light, semi-classical and quantum mechanical description of light-matter interaction, laser manipulation of atoms and ions, optomechanics and quantum computation.
ObjectiveThe course aims to provide the knowledge necessary for pursuing research in the field of Quantum Optics. Fundamental concepts and techniques of Quantum Optics will be linked to modern experimental research. During the course the students should acquire the capability to understand currently published research in the field.
ContentThis course gives an introduction to the fundamental concepts of Quantum Optics and will highlight state-of-the-art developments in this rapidly evolving discipline. The topics that are covered include:

- coherence properties of light
- quantum nature of light: statistics and non-classical states of light
- light matter interaction: density matrix formalism and Bloch equations
- quantum description of light matter interaction: the Jaynes-Cummings model, photon blockade
- laser manipulation of atoms and ions: laser cooling and trapping, atom interferometry,
- further topics: Rydberg atoms, optomechanics, quantum computing, complex quantum systems.
Lecture notesSelected book chapters will be distributed.
LiteratureText-books:

G. Grynberg, A. Aspect and C. Fabre, Introduction to Quantum Optics
R. Loudon, The Quantum Theory of Light
Atomic Physics, Christopher J. Foot
Advances in Atomic Physics, Claude Cohen-Tannoudji and David Guéry-Odelin
C. Cohen-Tannoudji et al., Atom-Photon-Interactions
M. Scully and M.S. Zubairy, Quantum Optics
Y. Yamamoto and A. Imamoglu, Mesoscopic Quantum Optics
402-0402-00LUltrafast Laser Physics Information W10 credits3V + 2UL. P. Gallmann, S. Johnson, U. Keller
AbstractIntroduction to ultrafast laser physics with an outlook into cutting edge research topics such as attosecond science and coherent ultrafast sources from THz to X-rays.
ObjectiveUnderstanding of basic physics and technology for pursuing research in ultrafast laser science. How are ultrashort laser pulses generated, how do they interact with matter, how can we measure these shortest man-made events and how can we use them to time-resolve ultrafast processes in nature? Fundamental concepts and techniques will be linked to a selection of hot topics in current research and applications.
ContentThe lecture covers the following topics:

a) Linear pulse propagation: mathematical description of pulses and their propagation in linear optical systems, effect of dispersion on ultrashort pulses, concepts of pulse carrier and envelope, time-bandwidth product

b) Dispersion compensation: technologies for controlling dispersion, pulse shaping, measurement of dispersion

c) Nonlinear pulse propagation: intensity-dependent refractive index (Kerr effect), self-phase modulation, nonlinear pulse compression, self-focusing, filamentation, nonlinear Schrödinger equation, solitons, non-instantaneous nonlinear effects (Raman/Brillouin), self-steepening, saturable gain and absorption

d) Second-order nonlinearities with ultrashort pulses: phase-matching with short pulses and real beams, quasi-phase matching, second-harmonic and sum-frequency generation, parametric amplification and generation

e) Relaxation oscillations: dynamical behavior of rate equations after perturbation

f) Q-switching: active Q-switching and its theory based on rate equations, active Q-switching technologies, passive Q-switching and theory

g) Active modelocking: introduction to modelocking, frequency comb versus axial modes, theory for various regimes of laser operation, Haus master equation formalism

h) Passive modelocking: slow, fast and ideally fast saturable absorbers, semiconductor saturable absorber mirror (SESAM), designs of and materials for SESAMs, modelocking with slow absorber and dynamic gain saturation, modelocking with ideally fast saturable absorber, Kerr-lens modelocking, soliton modelocking, Q-switching instabilities in modelocked lasers, inverse saturable absorption

i) Pulse duration measurements: rf cables and electronics, fast photodiodes, linear system theory for microwave test systems, intensity and interferometric autocorrelations and their limitations, frequency-resolved optical gating, spectral phase interferometry for direct electric-field reconstruction and more

j) Noise: microwave spectrum analyzer as laser diagnostics, amplitude noise and timing jitter of ultrafast lasers, lock-in detection

k) Ultrafast measurements: pump-probe scheme, transient absorption/differential transmission spectroscopy, four-wave mixing, optical gating and more

l) Frequency combs and carrier-envelope offset phase: measurement and stabilization of carrier-envelope offset phase (CEP), time and frequency domain applications of CEP-stabilized sources

m) High-harmonic generation and attosecond science: non-perturbative nonlinear optics / strong-field phenomena, high-harmonic generation (HHG), phase-matching in HHG, attosecond pulse generation, attosecond technology: detectors and diagnostics, attosecond metrology (streaking, RABBITT, transient absorption, attoclock), example experiments

n) Ultrafast THz science: generation and detection, physics in THz domain, weak-field and strong-field applications

o) Brief introduction to other hot topics: relativistic and ultra-high intensity ultrafast science, ultrafast electron sources, free-electron lasers, etc.
Lecture notesClass notes will be made available.
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequisites: Basic knowledge of quantum electronics (e. g., 402-0275-00L Quantenelektronik).
402-0891-00LPhenomenology of Particle Physics IW10 credits3V + 2UA. Gehrmann-De Ridder, R. Wallny
AbstractTopics to be covered in Phenomenology of Particle Physics I:
Relativistic kinematics
Decay rates and cross sections
The Dirac equation
From the S-matrix to the Feynman rules of QED
Scattering processes in QED
Experimental tests of QED
Hadron spectroscopy
Unitary symmetries and QCD
QCD and alpha_s running
QCD in e^+e^- annihilation
Experimental tests of QCD in e^+e^- annihilation
ObjectiveIntroduction to modern particle physics
ContentTopics to be covered in Phenomenology of Particle Physics I:
Relativistic kinematics
Decay rates and cross sections
The Dirac equation
From the S-matrix to the Feynman rules of QED
Scattering processes in QED
Experimental tests of QED
Hadron spectroscopy
Unitary symmetries and QCD
QCD and alpha_s running
QCD in e^+e^- annihilation
Experimental tests of QCD in e^+e^- annihilation
LiteratureAs described in the entity: Lernmaterialien
Electives
Electives: Physics and Mathematics
Selection: Solid State Physics
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
402-0521-66LModern Aspects in Surface Science Research: Techniques and ApplicationsW6 credits2V + 1UO. Gürlü
AbstractThe Course will treat the subjects of the crystal structure of bulk and surfaces, imaging surfaces with electrons and ions, general scanning probe microscopy methods, Scanning Tunnelling Microscopy, Atomic force microscopy, Electronic structure of the bulk and surfaces, Photoelectric emission, STM and AFM spectroscopy. The various techniques will be illustrated with examples from modern research.
ObjectiveIt is the aim of this course to provide a review of modern aspects in surface science research.
ContentCourse description
The course will start with an overview of the fundamentals of bulk crystals and a reminder on the x-ray diffraction from crystals. We will continue with the extension of the alphabet of bulk crystal structure to surfaces and the nomenclature of surface reconstructions and interesting structures like moiré patterns will be introduced. Following the two introductory weeks, we will dwell in to the realm of imaging the surfaces. We will start with electron beam based imaging and analysis techniques of surfaces. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Low Energy Electron Diffraction (LEED) and Low Energy Electron Microscopy (LEEM) will be discussed. Imaging with ion beam based techniques like Low Energy Ion Scattering (LEIS) and He-ion microscopy will be touched upon. Following these, probe microscopy techniques will be explored starting with the topografiner and continuing with Scanning Tunnelling Microscopy (STM). Basics of Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) will follow. Imaging is a fundamental part of efforts on understanding surfaces. Yet, a through understanding and capability of generating and manipulating novel surface and interface systems can only be achieved by studying the electronic structure of surfaces. In order to investigate the electronic structure of surface and interface systems, a basic knowledge of the bulk electronic structure is necessary. So, introductory concepts on the electronic structure of the bulk and low dimensional systems will be discussed. Then, the basics of photoelectron emission form surfaces will be given. In the final two weeks of the course an overview of the spectroscopic modes of scanning probes and atomic scale electron spectroscopy will be introduced.

Course contents
1) Introduction and reminder of bulk crystals (week 1):
Reminder of the crystal structure, x-ray diffraction and determination of the crystal structure.

2) Crystal surfaces (weeks 2 and 3):
Definitions, description of surfaces, and reconstructions; Moire patterns; quasi-crystals.

3) Imaging surfaces with electrons (week 4):
SEM, LEED, LEEM

4) Imaging surfaces with ions (week 5):
LEIS, He ion microscopy

5) Introduction to probe microscopy (week 6):
General problems , field ion microscope, topografiner

6) Scanning Tunnelling Microscopy (weeks 6, 7 and 8):
Tunnelling problem (reminder), work function derivation and measurement with STM, imaging surfaces in real space, surface reconstructions, examples form metals and semiconductors and hybrid surface systems

7) Atomic force microscopy (week 9):
Technique, basics, examples.

8) Electronic structure of the bulk (week 10):
Reminders: density of states, band structure, low dimensional systems

9) Electronic structure of surfaces (week 11):
Bulk derived states, image states, examples from STM research

10) Photoelectric emission (week 12):
Basics of spectroscopy with x-rays and electrons.

11) STM and AFM derived spectroscopy techniques (weeks 13 and 14):
Comparative studies of Scanning Tunnelling spectroscopy (STS) to other integral spectroscopic methods.
Literature1) John A. Venables, Introduction to Surface and Thin Film Processes, Cambridge University Press (2000)
2) Hans Lüth, Solid Surfaces, Interfaces and Thin Films (6th ed.), Springer (2010)
3) Andrew Zangwill , Physics at Surfaces, Cambridge University Press (1988)
4) Julian Chen, Introduction to Scanning Tunneling Microscopy, Oxford University Press (2016)
5) Bert Voigtlaender, Scanning Probe Microscopy: Atomic Force Microscopy and Scanning Tunneling Microscopy, Springer (2015)
6) Charles Kittel, Introduction to Solid State Physics (8th Ed.)
7) Neil W. Ashcroft and N. David Mermin, Solid State Physics
8) Harald Ibach and Hans Lüth, Solid-State Physics: An Introduction to Principles of Materials Science
9) Further reading material will be supplied.
Prerequisites / NoticeAt least, 4 homework will be assigned.
402-0526-00LUltrafast Processes in SolidsW6 credits2V + 1UY. M. Acremann, A. Vaterlaus
AbstractUltrafast processes in solids are of fundamental interest as well as relevant for modern technological applications. The dynamics of the lattice, the electron gas as well as the spin system of a solid are discussed. The focus is on time resolved experiments which provide insight into pico- and femtosecond dynamics.
ObjectiveAfter attending this course you understand the dynamics of essential excitation processes which occur in solids and you have an overview over state of the art experimental techniques used to study fast processes.
Content1. Experimental techniques, an overview

2. Dynamics of the electron gas
2.1 First experiments on electron dynamics and lattice heating
2.2 The finite lifetime of excited states
2.3 Detection of lifetime effects
2.4 Dynamical properties of reactions and adsorbents

3. Dynamics of the lattice
3.1 Phonons
3.2 Non-thermal melting

4. Dynamics of the spin system
4.1 Laser induced ultrafast demagnetization
4.2 Ultrafast spin currents generated by lasers
4.3 Landau-Lifschitz-Dynamics
4.4 Laser induced switching

5. Correlated materials
Lecture noteswill be distributed
Literaturerelevant publications will be cited
Prerequisites / NoticeThe lecture can also be followed by interested non-physics students as basic concepts will be introduced.

This lecture is complementary to the lecture on "ultrafast methods for solid state physics" of the spring semester. Both lectures can be attended independently. The focus of this lecture is on the physical processes whereas the focus of the "ultrafast methods for solid state physics" lecture is on the experimental techniques.
402-0535-00LIntroduction to MagnetismW6 credits2V + 1UA. Vindigni
AbstractAtomic paramagnetism and diamagnetism, intinerant and local-moment magnetism, Ising and Heisenberg models, the mean-field approximation, spin waves, magnetic phase transition, domains and domain walls, magnetization dynamics from picoseconds to human time scales.
Objective
ContentThe lecture ''Introduction to Magnetism'' is the regular course on Magnetism for the Master curriculum of the Department of Physics of ETH Zurich. With respect to specialized courses related to Magnetism (such as the one held by R. Allenspach in FS16) this lecture addresses more fundamental aspects -- quantum and statistical physics of magnetism -- which are often not comprehensively spelled out in conventional lectures on solid state physics.
Preliminary contents for the HS16:
- Magnetism in atoms (quantum-mechanical origin of atomic magnetic moments, intra-atomic exchange interaction)
- Magnetism in solids (mechanisms producing inter-atomic exchange interaction in solids, crystal field).
- Magnetic order at finite temperatures (Ising and Heisenberg models, mean-field approximation, low-dimensional magnetism)
- Dipolar interaction in ferromagnets (shape anisotropy, frustration and modulated phases of magnetic domains)
- Spin physics in the time domain (Larmor precession, resonance phenomena, Bloch equation, Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation, superparamagnetism)
Lecture notesLecture notes and slides are made available during the course, through the Moodle portal.
Prerequisites / NoticeThe former title of this course unit was "Fundamental Aspects of Magnetism". This lecture insists on the fundamental aspects -- quantum physics and statistical physics of magnetism.
Applications to nanoscale magnetism will be considered from the perspective of basic underlying principles.
402-0595-00LSemiconductor Nanostructures Information W6 credits2V + 1UT. M. Ihn
AbstractThe course covers the foundations of semiconductor nanostructures, e.g., materials, band structures, bandgap engineering and doping, field-effect transistors. The physics of the quantum Hall effect and of common nanostructures based on two-dimensional electron gases will be discussed, i.e., quantum point contacts, Aharonov-Bohm rings and quantum dots.
ObjectiveAt the end of the lecture the student should understand four key phenomena of electron transport in semiconductor nanostructures:
1. The integer quantum Hall effect
2. Conductance quantization in quantum point contacts
3. the Aharonov-Bohm effect
4. Coulomb blockade in quantum dots
Content1. Introduction and overview
2. Semiconductor crystals: Fabrication and band structures
3. k.p-theory, effective mass
4. Envelope functions and effective mass approximation, heterostructures and band engineering
5. Fabrication of semiconductor nanostructures
6. Elektrostatics and quantum mechanics of semiconductor nanostructures
7. Heterostructures and two-dimensional electron gases
8. Drude Transport
9. Electron transport in quantum point contacts; Landauer-Büttiker description
10. Ballistic transport experiments
11. Interference effects in Aharonov-Bohm rings
12. Electron in a magnetic field, Shubnikov-de Haas effect
13. Integer quantum Hall effect
14. Coulomb blockade and quantum dots
Lecture notesT. Ihn, Semiconductor Nanostructures, Quantum States and Electronic Transport, Oxford University Press, 2010.
LiteratureIn addition to the lecture notes, the following supplementary books can be recommended:
1. J. H. Davies: The Physics of Low-Dimensional Semiconductors, Cambridge University Press (1998)
2. S. Datta: Electronic Transport in Mesoscopic Systems, Cambridge University Press (1997)
3. D. Ferry: Transport in Nanostructures, Cambridge University Press (1997)
4. T. M. Heinzel: Mesoscopic Electronics in Solid State Nanostructures: an Introduction, Wiley-VCH (2003)
5. Beenakker, van Houten: Quantum Transport in Semiconductor Nanostructures, in: Semiconductor Heterostructures and Nanostructures, Academic Press (1991)
6. Y. Imry: Introduction to Mesoscopic Physics, Oxford University Press (1997)
Prerequisites / NoticeThe lecture is suitable for all physics students beyond the bachelor of science degree. Basic knowledge of solid state physics is recommended. Very ambitioned students in the third year may be able to follow. The lecture can be chosen as part of the PhD-program. The course is taught in English.
402-0313-00LMaterials Research Using Synchrotron Radiation Information W6 credits2V + 2PL. Heyderman, V. Scagnoli
AbstractThe course gives an introduction to the use of synchrotron radiation in materials science. It treats the generation of intense x-ray beams at synchrotron radiation sources and their use for the characterisation of materials properties at different length scales. As part of the course, experiments will be carried out at the Swiss Light Source, Paul Scherrrer Institut.
ObjectiveA comprehensive understanding of the interaction of x-rays with condensed matter and their use in materials analysis; acquiring hands-on experience with the use of synchrotron radiation.
ContentInteraction of x-rays with matter:
Elastic scattering from bound electron, atom and assemblies of atoms; Compton scattering; principles of diffraction from crystals and scattering from disordered systems; thermal diffuse scattering, small-angle scattering from nanometre-sized objects; X-ray absorption spectroscopy; microscopy; comparison with neutron scattering, where appropriate.

The generation of high-brilliance x-ray beams at synchrotron radiation sources:
Undulators, wigglers and bending magnets; comparison with conventional lab sources; the future x-ray free electron laser.

Instrumentation:
Monochromator; diffractometer; detector.

Determination of materials properties:
Crystal structure; defects and strain fields; structure of surfaces and interfaces; chemical bonding properties.

New methods:
Coherent x-ray scattering and diffractive imaging.
Lecture notesA reader and a guide through the experiments at the Swiss Light Source will be made available on the web.
LiteraturePhilip Willmott: An Introduction to Synchrotron Radiation: Techniques and Applications, Wiley, 2011

J. Als-Nielsen and D. McMorrow: Elements of Modern X-Ray Physics, Wiley, 2011.

The lab course has been designed by J. Als-Nielsen in collaboration with staff from the SLS.
Prerequisites / NoticePart of the course is in the form of practical work at the Swiss Light Source. During two days (dates to be agreed), the following experiments will be performed: (1) elastic and Compton scattering, (2) liquid scattering and powder diffraction, and (4) X-ray absorption spectroscopy.
402-0317-00LSemiconductor Materials: Fundamentals and FabricationW6 credits2V + 1US. Schön, W. Wegscheider
AbstractThis course gives an introduction into the fundamentals of semiconductor materials. The main focus is on state-of-the-art fabrication and characterization methods. The course will be continued in the spring term with a focus on applications.
ObjectiveBasic knowledge of semiconductor physics and technology. Application of this knowledge for state-of-the-art semiconductor device processing
ContentFundamentals of Solid State Physics: Semiconductor materials, band structures, carrier statistics in intrinsic and doped seminconductors, p-n junctions, low-dimensional structures;
Bulk Material growth of Semiconductors: Czochralski method, floating zone method, high pressure synthesis;
Semiconductor Epitaxy: Fundamentals, MBE, MOCVD, LPE;
In situ characterization: RHEED, LEED, AES, XPS, process control (temperature, thickness)
Lecture noteshttps://moodle-app2.let.ethz.ch/course/view.php?id=2395
Selection: Quantum Electronics
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
402-0464-00LOptical Properties of SemiconductorsW8 credits2V + 2UA. Imamoglu, G. Scalari
AbstractThis course presents a comprehensive discussion of optical processes in semiconductors.
ObjectiveThe rich physics of the optical properties of semiconductors, as well as the advanced processing available on these material, enabled numerous applications (lasers, LEDs and solar cells) as well as the realization of new physical concepts. Systems that will be covered include quantum dots, exciton-polaritons, quantum Hall fluids and graphene-like materials.
ContentElectronic states in III-V materials and quantum structures, optical transitions, excitons and polaritons, novel two dimensional semiconductors, spin-orbit interaction and magneto-optics.
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequisites: Quantum Mechanics I, Introduction to Solid State Physics
402-0865-66LPhysics of Cold Atomic GasesW6 credits2V + 1UW. Zwerger
Abstract
Objective
402-0415-62LModern Topics in Terahertz Science Information W6 credits2V + 1US. Johnson
AbstractThis course reviews current research topics in Terahertz Science with a strong focus on scientific applications in physics, chemistry and biology, as well as the emerging field of nonlinear THz optics.
ObjectiveTerahertz frequency electromagnetic radiation lies at the border between electronics and optics, and as such has many unique properties that make it well-suited to study the electronic, magnetic and structural properties of many materials. The course objective is to give students the ability to identify problems of current interest in physics, chemistry, materials science and biology that can be potentially addressed using terahertz photonics and to design potential experimental solutions.

The course will focus predominantly on understanding research conducted over the last 4-5 years at the forefront of this developing field, with a strong emphasis on nonlinear THz science which has only recently become possible. This in particular has generated excitement as it offers potential new ways to control chemical reactions and/or phase transitons in materials.
ContentTopics to be discussed in the class include:

1) Overview of THz & interactions with matter
2) THz generation and detection
3) Linear THz spectroscopies
4) Imaging
5) Nonlinear THz interactions
Lecture notesScripts will be distributed via moodle.
LiteratureThe readings for the course will draw mostly on current journal articles that will be distributed in class/via moodle. There is also a general textbook listed below available electronically via the ETH library system. You can also order a black-and-white paperback via an "on-demand" system for a pretty reasonable price.

Principles of Terahertz Science and Technology, Yun-Shick Lee (Springer, 2008).
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequqisites: Quantum electronics.

The former course title of this course is "Terahertz Technology and Applications".
Selection: Particle Physics, Nuclear Physics
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
402-0725-00LExperimental Methods and Instruments of Particle Physics Information W6 credits3V + 1UU. Langenegger, M. Dittmar, A. Streun, University lecturers
AbstractPhysics and design of particle accelerators.
Basics and concepts of particle detectors.
Track- and vertex-detectors, calorimetry, particle identification.
Special applications like Cherenkov detectors, air showers, direct detection of dark matter.
Simulation methods, readout electronics, trigger and data acquisition.
Examples of key experiments.
ObjectiveAcquire an in-depth understanding and overview of the essential elements of experimental methods in particle physics, including accelerators and experiments.
Content1. Examples of modern experiments
2. Basics: Bethe-Bloch, radiation length, nucl. interaction length, fixed-target vs. collider, principles of measurements: energy- and momentum-conservation, etc
3. Physics and layout of accelerators
4. Charged particle tracking and vertexing
5. Calorimetry
6. Particle identification
7. Analysis methods: invariant and missing mass, jet algorithms, b-tagging
8. Special detectors: extended airshower detectors and cryogenic detectors
9. MC simulations (GEANT), trigger, readout, electronics
Lecture notesSlides are handed out regularly, see http://www.physik.uzh.ch/en/teaching/PHY461/HS2016.html
402-0713-00LAstro-Particle Physics I Information W6 credits2V + 1UA. Biland
AbstractThis lecture gives an overview of the present research in the field of Astro-Particle Physics, including the different experimental techniques. In the first semester, main topics are the charged cosmic rays including the antimatter problem. The second semester focuses on the neutral components of the cosmic rays as well as on some aspects of Dark Matter.
ObjectiveSuccessful students know:
- experimental methods to measure cosmic ray particles over full energy range
- current knowledge about the composition of cosmic ray
- possible cosmic acceleration mechanisms
- correlation between astronomical object classes and cosmic accelerators
- information about our galaxy and cosmology gained from observations of cosmic ray
ContentFirst semester (Astro-Particle Physics I):
- definition of 'Astro-Particle Physics'
- important historical experiments
- chemical composition of the cosmic rays
- direct observations of cosmic rays
- indirect observations of cosmic rays
- 'extended air showers' and 'cosmic muons'
- 'knee' and 'ankle' in the energy spectrum
- the 'anti-matter problem' and the Big Bang
- 'cosmic accelerators'
Lecture notesSee lecture home page: http://ihp-lx2.ethz.ch/AstroTeilchen/
LiteratureSee lecture home page: http://ihp-lx2.ethz.ch/AstroTeilchen/
402-0833-00LParticle Physics in the Early Universe
Does not take place this semester.
W6 credits2V + 1U
AbstractAn introduction to key concepts on the interface of Particle Physics and Early Universe cosmology. Topics include inflation and inflationary models, the ElectroWeak phase transition and vacuum stability, matter-antimatter asymmetry, recombination and the Cosmic Microwave Background, relic abundances and primordial nucleosynthesis, baryogenesis, dark matter and more.
Objective
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequisites: Particle Physics Phenomenolgy 1 or Quantum Field Theory 1
Recommended: Quantum Field Theory 2, Advanced Field Theory, General Relativity
402-0715-00LLow Energy Particle PhysicsW6 credits2V + 1UA. S. Antognini, P. A. Schmidt-Wellenburg
AbstractLow energy particle physics provides complementary information to high energy physics with colliders. In this lecture, we will concentrate on selected experiments, using mainly neutrons and muons, which have significantly improved our understanding of particle physics today.
ObjectiveThe course aims to provide an introduction to selected advanced topics in low energy particle physics with neutrons and muons.
ContentLow energy particle physics provides complementary information to high energy physics with colliders. At the Large Hadron Collider one directly searches for new particles at energies up to the TeV range. In a complementary way, low energy particle physics indirectly probes the existence of such particles and provides constraints for "new physics", making use of precision and high intensities.

Besides the sensitivity to effects related with new physics (e.g. lepton flavor violation, symmetry violations, CPT tests, search for electric dipole moments, new low mass exchange bosons etc.), low energy physics provides the best test of QED (electron g-2), the best tests of bound-state QED (atomic physics and exotic atoms), precise determinations of fundamental constants, information about the CKM matrix, precise information on the weak and strong force even in the non-perturbative regime etc.

In this lecture, we will concentrate on selected experiments, using mainly neutrons and muons, which have significantly improved our understanding of particle physics today. Starting from a general introduction on high intensity/high precision particle physics and the main characteristics of muons and neutrons and their production, we will then focus on the discussion of fundamental problems and ground-breaking experiments:

- Production and characteristics of muon and neutron beams
- Ultracold neutron production
- Measurement of the neutron lifetime and electric dipole moment
- The neutron in the gravitational field and its electric charge
- Muon and neutron decay correlations
- Lepton flavour violations with muons to search for new physics
- What atomic physics can do for particle physics and vice versa
- Laser experiments at accelerators
- From myonic hydrogen to the proton structure and bound-state QED
- From pionic hydrogen to the strong interaction and effective field theories
- etc.
LiteratureGolub, Richardson & Lamoreaux: "Ultra-Cold Neutrons"
Rauch & Werner: "Neutron Interferometry"
Carlile & Willis: "Experimental Neutron Scattering"
Byrne: "Neutrons, Nuclei and Matter"
Klapdor-Kleingrothaus: "Non Accelerator Particle Physics"
Prerequisites / NoticeEinführung in die Kern- und Teilchenphysik / Introduction to Nuclear- and Particle-Physics
  •  Page  1  of  6 Next page Last page     All