Dennis Hofheinz: Catalogue data in Spring Semester 2020

Name Prof. Dr. Dennis Hofheinz
FieldComputer Science
Address
Inst. f. Theoretische Informatik
ETH Zürich, CAB H 33.3
Universitätstrasse 6
8092 Zürich
SWITZERLAND
Telephone+41 44 632 40 29
E-mailhofheinz@inf.ethz.ch
URLhttps://people.inf.ethz.ch/dhofheinz/
DepartmentComputer Science
RelationshipFull Professor

NumberTitleECTSHoursLecturers
263-4651-00LCurrent Topics in Cryptography Information Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 24.

The deadline for deregistering expires at the end of the second week of the semester. Students who are still registered after that date, but do not attend the seminar, will officially fail the seminar.
2 credits2SD. Hofheinz, U. Maurer, K. Paterson
AbstractIn this seminar course, students present and discuss a variety of recent research papers in Cryptography.
ObjectiveIndependent study of scientific literature and assessment of its contributions as well as learning and practicing presentation techniques.
ContentThe course lecturers will provide a list of papers from which students will select.
LiteratureThe reading list will be published on the course website.
Prerequisites / NoticeIdeally, students will have taken the D-INFK Bachelors course “Information Security" or an equivalent course at Bachelors level. Ideally, they will have attended or will attend in parallel the Masters course in "Applied Cryptography”.
263-4656-00LDigital Signatures Information 4 credits2V + 1AD. Hofheinz
AbstractDigital signatures as one central cryptographic building block. Different security goals and security definitions for digital signatures, followed by a variety of popular and fundamental signature schemes with their security analyses.
ObjectiveThe student knows a variety of techniques to construct and analyze the security of digital signature schemes. This includes modularity as a central tool of constructing secure schemes, and reductions as a central tool to proving the security of schemes.
ContentWe will start with several definitions of security for signature schemes, and investigate the relations among them. We will proceed to generic (but inefficient) constructions of secure signatures, and then move on to a number of efficient schemes based on concrete computational hardness assumptions. On the way, we will get to know paradigms such as hash-then-sign, one-time signatures, and chameleon hashing as central tools to construct secure signatures.
LiteratureJonathan Katz, "Digital Signatures."
Prerequisites / NoticeIdeally, students will have taken the D-INFK Bachelors course "Information Security" or an equivalent course at Bachelors level.