Tom Crowther: Catalogue data in Spring Semester 2019

Name Prof. Dr. Tom Crowther
FieldGlobal Ecosystem Ecology
Address
Institut für Integrative Biologie
ETH Zürich, CHN G 66
Universitätstrasse 16
8092 Zürich
SWITZERLAND
Telephone+41 44 632 32 01
E-mailtom.crowther@usys.ethz.ch
DepartmentEnvironmental Systems Science
RelationshipAssistant Professor (Tenure Track)

NumberTitleECTSHoursLecturers
701-1461-00LEcology and Evolution: Seminar Restricted registration - show details
Direct continuation of course unit 701-1460-00L "Ecology and Evolution: Term Paper" of the previous semester (HS).
3 credits6ST. Städler, S. Bonhoeffer, T. Crowther, A. Hall, J. Jokela, G. Velicer, A. Widmer
AbstractThe organization and functioning of academic research as well as academic publishing are introduced and applied: students critically review two term papers written by their student colleagues. Based on the reviews, the authors of the papers write reply letters and revise their own term papers. They finally present their topic during an in-house "mini-conference" with a talk.
Objective• Students become familiar with the academic peer-review and publishing process
• They learn to evaluate the quality of a manuscript and formulate constructive criticism
• They learn to deal with criticism of their own work (by their student peers)
• They practise oral presentations and discussions in English
ContentThe organization and functioning of academic research as well as academic publishing are introduced and applied: students critically review two term papers written by their student colleagues. Based on the reviews, the authors of the papers write reply letters and revise their own term papers. They finally present their topic during an in-house "mini-conference" with a talk.
Lecture notesnone
Prerequisites / NoticeDirect continuation of "Ecology and Evolution: Term Paper" of the previous semester
701-1646-00LCarbon and Nutrient Cycling in a Changing Climate and Land-Use5 credits3GF. Hagedorn, T. Crowther, S. Dötterl
AbstractThe course covers the pools and fluxes of carbon and nutrients in forests and dynamic landscapes and how they are affected by a changing climate and land-use. Specifically, the course explores carbon and nutrient cycling: (i) in vegetation and soils at the plot to global scale; (ii) the role of abiotic soil properties as controls; and (iii) the effects of climate changes and land management.
ObjectiveThe students learn to identify, analyze and propose solutions for problems associated with land management and climate change on carbon and nutrient cycling in forests and dynamic landscapes.
ContentAfter short thematic introductions, the students will work in small groups on the following topics:

Part 1 Carbon and nutrient pools and fluxes in terrestrial ecosystems of Switzerland
o Carbon and nutrient cycles from the plot to national scale
o Impacts of land use changes on biomass and soil carbon
o Effects of soil warming and drought

Part 2: Rock, soil, sediment: Geomorphic cascades and soil weathering
o Weathering and geochemistry as controls on carbon and nutrient cycles
o Feedbacks between soil development, soil transport and soil loss for carbon cycling
o Global patterns and consequences of disturbance for soil landscapes

Part 3: Global biogeochemical cycles and climate change
o Global biogeochemical cycles and impacts on climate
o Carbon cycle feedbacks to climate change
o Changes in global nutrient balance

The students will work on specific projects which includes the evaluation and interpretation of data as well as the preparation of a presentation either as a poster, report or a talk.
Prerequisites / NoticeApart from a background in terrestrial ecosystems, the students must have basic knowledge in soil sciences, plant nutrition, and biogeochemical cycles. Given that the background of the students will be very heterogeneous, the course will build on individual learning and interactive teaching.

The format of the course is that the students work in small groups of 2 or 3 members on a small project in each of the three parts of the course. Introductory information will be given on the first day of the course and at the beginning of each part. For structuring the project, homework will be given from week to week. Each group will do a poster presentation (end of part 1), a short report (end of part 2) and an oral presentation (end of part 3) on their respective subjects. Active participation at all contact hours is compulsory for all students.
701-1674-00LGeospatial Data Management and Analysis Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 25.

Prerequisites: 701-0951-00L "GIS - Introduction into Geoinformation Science" in autum semester or comparable preparatory training.
5 credits4GM. A. M. Niederhuber, T. Crowther
AbstractProblems encountered in forest and landscape management often have a spatial dimension. Methods of geoinformation sciences provide support in identifying creative solutions. Students will learn to a) understand, search for, and manage different forms of geospatial data; b) conceptualize, implement, and combine spatial analysis methods; and c) interpret the results.
ObjectiveUnderstand, search for, and manage various types of geospatial data; Carry out conceptual data modelling for a spatial problem and translate it into a tangible form within a GIS software; Conceptualize spatial problems and design a workflow that transitions from "data processing" through "advanced spatial analysis" to "presentation of results"; Implement such a workflow in standard GIS software, verify and validate the procedures, then present the final results.
Prerequisites / NoticeKnowledge and skills equal those of the course "GIST - Einführung in die räumliche Informationswissenschaften und Technologien"