Derek Vance: Catalogue data in Autumn Semester 2017

Award: The Golden Owl
Name Prof. Dr. Derek Vance
FieldGeochemistry
Address
Inst. für Geochemie und Petrologie
ETH Zürich, NW D 81.4
Clausiusstrasse 25
8092 Zürich
SWITZERLAND
Telephone+41 44 632 68 81
Fax+41 44 632 11 79
E-mailderek.vance@erdw.ethz.ch
URLhttp://www.erdw.ethz.ch/en/people/profile.html?persid=85257
DepartmentEarth Sciences
RelationshipFull Professor

NumberTitleECTSHoursLecturers
651-0254-00LSeminar Geochemistry and Petrology0 credits2SO. Bachmann, M. Schönbächler, C. A. Heinrich, M. W. Schmidt, D. Vance
AbstractSeminar series with external and occasional internal speakers addressing current research topics. Changing programs announced via D-ERDW homepage (Veranstaltungskalender)
ObjectivePresentations on isotope geochemistry, cosmochemistry, fluid processes, economic geology, petrology, mineralogy and experimental studies. Mostly international speakers provide students, department members and interested guests with insight into current research topics in these fields.
ContentWöchentliches Seminar mit Fachvorträgen eingeladener oder interner Wissenschafter, vornehmlich zu Themen der Geochemie, Isotogengeologie, Hydrothermalgeochemie, Lagerstättenbildung, Petrologie, Mineralogie und experimentelle Studien.
651-1091-00LColloquium Department Earth Sciences0 credits1KH. Stoll, D. Vance
AbstractInvited speakers from the entire range of Earth Sciences.
ObjectiveSelected themes in sedimentology, tectonics, paläontology, geophysics, mineralogy, paleoclimate and engineering geology on a regional and global scale.
ContentAccording to variable program.
Lecture notesNo
LiteratureNo
651-3400-00LGeochemistry I Information
Dieser Kurs ersetzt 651-3400-00 Geochemie. Sofern Geochemie absolviert wurde, darf der Kurs nicht belegt werden.
4 credits3GM. Schönbächler, D. Vance
AbstractIntroduction to geochemistry and its application to the study of the origin and evolution of the Earth and planets.
ObjectiveGain an overview of geochemical methods used in various fields of Earth Sciences and how they can be applied to study geological processes in the Earth’s mantle, crust, oceans and atmosphere.
ContentThis course is an introduction into geochemistry with a special focus on the basic concepts used in this rapidly evolving field. The course deals with the geochemist's toolbox: the basic chemical and nuclear properties of elements from the periodic table and how these elements can be used to ask fundamental questions in Earth Sciences. The important concepts used in solid-solution-gas equilibria are introduced. The concepts of chemical reservoirs and geochemical cycles are discussed with examples from the carbon cycle in the Earth. The course also addresses geological applications in low- and high-temperature geochemistry, including the formation of continents, the differentiation of the Earth, the geochemistry of ocean and continental waters.
Lecture notesAvailable
LiteratureH. Y. McSween et al.: Geochemistry - Pathways and Processes,
2nd ed. Columbia Univ. Press (2003)

William White: Geochemistry, Wiley-Blackwell Chichester (2013)
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequisite: chemical thermodynamics, basic inorganic chemistry and physics.
651-3501-00LIsotope Geochemistry and Isotope Geology
The course will no longer be taught after HS17.
3 credits2GS. Bernasconi, D. Vance
AbstractThe course focuses on the most important systems of radioactive and stable isotopes used in geochemistry and geology. Applications of isotope geochemistry for solving fundamental geological problems are discussed on the basis of case studies.
ObjectiveDevelopment of a basic knowledge and understanding of the applications of the most important systems of stable and radiogenic isotopes.
ContentThe following methods will be discussed in detail: the radioactive-radiogenic systems Rb-Sr, Sm-Nd, U-Th-Pb and K-Ar, as well as the stable isotope systems of oxygen, carbon, nitrogen, sulfur and hydrogen.

We will discuss how these methods are used in the following research fields: geochemistry of the earth, age dating, paleotemperature reconstructions, evolution of the crust and mantle reservoirs, sediment diagenesis, fluid rock interactions, hydrothermal activity, paleoceanography, biogeochemical cycles.
Lecture notesAvailable
Literature- Gunter Faure and Teresa M. Mensing. (2005): Isotopes : principles and applications. 3nd Ed. John Wiley & Sons. 897.pp

- Dickin A. P., Radiogenic Isotope Geology, (2005), Cambridge University Press

- Sharp Z.D. (2006) Principles of stable isotope geochemistry. Prentice Hall 360 pp.

William White (2011) Geochemistry
http://www.geo.cornell.edu/geology/classes/geo455/Chapters.HTML
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequisites:

Geochemie I: (Bachelor course)
651-3507-00LIntroduction to Oceanography and Hydrogeology3 credits2VD. Vance, M. O. Saar
AbstractThe course provides an introduction to hydrogeology and oceanography for all Earth Science students at ETH. It provides an overview of the physical controls on water flow in streams, aquifers, and the oceans. It also deals with the basics of groundwater chemistry, biogeochemical cycling in the oceans, the role of the oceans as carbon reservoirs and their dynamic redox state.
ObjectiveTo understand and describe the basic principles of the hydrologic cycle and water flow in streams and aquifers.

To conduct simple calculations of water transfer in streams and aquifers as well as of flood frequencies and magnitudes.

To discuss surface and groundwater as a water resource.

To interpret different ion distributions in aquifers in terms of bacic water chemistry, fluid-mineral reactions, water contamination, and water origin.

To understand the major features of ocean basins and the tectonic controls on their structure.

To identify the major controls on the temperature, salinity and density structure of the oceans.

To describe how these controls interact to drive surface and interior ocean circulation.

To interpret different kinds of element distribution in the oceans in terms of basic chemistry, sinks, sources and internal biogeochemical cycling.

To discuss the cycles of carbon and oxygen in the ocean, with a view to the critical analysis of how the oceans respond to, cause and record the dynamics of these cycles in Earth history.
ContentThis course provides an introduction to oceanography and hydrogeology, with a special focus on the basic physicochemical concepts that control the properties and behaviour of two major reservoirs of water on Earth.

The hydrogeology component will: 1) describe the hydrologic cycle, with a focus on the importance of groundwater to society; introduce the basic physical aspects of groundwater flow, including Darcy's law, hydraulic head, hydraulic conductivity, aquifers; 2) describe the basics of groundwater chemistry, including major ions and mean meteoric water line, basics of groundwater contamination; 3) introduce the interface with the oceans, including hydrothermal circulation at mid-ocean ridges, ocean-water intrusion into groundwater at coasts.

The oceanography component will: 1) provide an overview of the physical circulation of the oceans, including its importance for heat transfer around the surface of the Earth and for climate; 2) describe the basic processes that control the chemistry of the oceans, including its temporal and spatial variability; 3) introduce some simple concepts in biological oceanography, including the dependence of ocean ecology on nutrient distributions. There will be a specific focus on how the physics, chemistry and biology of the ocean might have changed through Earth history, and the impact of oceanic processes on Earth's climate.
Lecture notesAvailable
LiteratureTalley, L.D., Pickard, G.L., Emery, W.J. and Swift, J.H. Descriptive Physical Oceanography, an Introduction. (2011) Online textbook, available at http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/book/9780750645522.

Libes, S.M. (2009) Introduction to marine biogeochemistry. 2nd edition. Academic Press
Prerequisites / NoticeChemie I and II, Physik I and II, Mathematik I and II.
651-4049-00LConceptual and Quantitative Methods in Geochemistry
For this course the successful completion of the BSc-course "Geochemistry" (651-3400-00L) is a condition.
3 credits2GO. Bachmann, M. Schönbächler, D. Vance, K. W. Burton
AbstractThis course will introduce some of the main quantitative methods available for the quantitative treatment of geochemical data, as well as the main modelling tools. Emphasis will both be on conceptual understanding of these methods as well as on their practical application, using key software packages to analyse real geochemical datasets.
ObjectiveDevelopment of a basic knowledge and understanding of the main tools available for the quantitative analysis of geochemical data.
ContentThe following approaches will be discussed in detail: major and trace element modelling of magmas, with application to igneous systems; methods and statistics for calculation of isochrons and model ages; reservoir dynamics and one-dimensional modelling of ocean chemistry; modelling speciation in aqueous (hydrothermal, fresh water sea water) fluids.

We will discuss how these methods are applied in a range of Earth Science fields, from cosmochemistry, through mantle and crustal geochemistry, volcanology and igneous petrology, to chemical oceanography.

A special emphasis will be put on dealing with geochemical problems through modeling. Where relevant, software packages will be introduced and applied to real geochemical data.
Lecture notesSlides of lectures will be available.
Prerequisites / NoticePre-requisite: Geochemistry (651-3400-00L), Isotope Geochemistry and Geochronology (651-3501-00L).