Lars-Erik Cederman: Catalogue data in Spring Semester 2022

Name Prof. Dr. Lars-Erik Cederman
FieldInternationale Konfliktforschung
Address
Internationale Konfliktforschung
ETH Zürich, IFW D 49.2
Haldeneggsteig 4
8092 Zürich
SWITZERLAND
Telephone+41 44 632 67 59
E-mailcederman@icr.gess.ethz.ch
DepartmentHumanities, Social and Political Sciences
RelationshipFull Professor

NumberTitleECTSHoursLecturers
364-1058-00LRisk Center Seminar Series0 credits2SH. Schernberg, D. Basin, A. Bommier, D. N. Bresch, S. Brusoni, L.‑E. Cederman, P. Cheridito, F. Corman, H. Gersbach, C. Hölscher, K. Paterson, G. Sansavini, D. Sornette, B. Stojadinovic, B. Sudret, J. Teichmann, R. Wattenhofer, U. A. Weidmann, S. Wiemer, M. Zeilinger, R. Zenklusen
AbstractIn this series of seminars, invited speakers discuss various topics in the area of risk modelling, governance of complex socio-economic systems, managing risks and crises, and building resilience. Students, PhD students, post-docs, faculty and individuals outside ETH are welcome.
ObjectiveParticipants gain insights in a broad range of risk- and resilience-related topics. They expand their knowledge of the field and deepen their understanding of the complexity of our social, economic and engineered systems. For young researchers in particular, the seminars offer an opportunity to learn academic presentation skills and to network with an interdisciplinary scientific audience.
ContentAcademic presentations from ETH faculty as well as external researchers.
Each seminar is followed by a Q&A session and (when permitted) a networking Apéro.
Lecture notesThe sessions are recorded whenever possible and posted on the ETH Risk Center webpage. If available, presentation slides are shared as well.
LiteratureEach speaker will provide a literature review.
Prerequisites / NoticeIn most cases, a quantitative background is required. Depending on the topic, field-specific knowledge may be required.
Fostered competenciesFostered competencies
Subject-specific CompetenciesConcepts and Theoriesnot assessed
Techniques and Technologiesnot assessed
Method-specific CompetenciesAnalytical Competenciesnot assessed
Decision-makingnot assessed
Media and Digital Technologiesnot assessed
Problem-solvingnot assessed
Project Managementnot assessed
Social CompetenciesCommunicationnot assessed
Cooperation and Teamworknot assessed
Customer Orientationnot assessed
Leadership and Responsibilitynot assessed
Self-presentation and Social Influence not assessed
Sensitivity to Diversitynot assessed
Negotiationnot assessed
Personal CompetenciesAdaptability and Flexibilitynot assessed
Creative Thinkingnot assessed
Critical Thinkingnot assessed
Integrity and Work Ethicsnot assessed
Self-awareness and Self-reflection not assessed
Self-direction and Self-management not assessed
853-0010-00LConflict Research II: Civil Wars Restricted registration - show details
Only for Public Policy BA.
4 credits2V + 1UA. Juon, L.‑E. Cederman
AbstractIntroduction to research on civil wars. This course covers the causes, processes and solutions to civil conflicts and wars.
Objective- Knowledge on different causes of civil wars.
- Knowledge on processes during civil wars.
- Knowledge on different solutions and strategies to end civil wars.
- Application of theory to current examples of civil wars.
ContentThis course focuses on civil war, which is the most common type of political violence. The course is divided into three blocks: The first part analyses the causes of civil wars. The second part focuses on processes during ongoing civil wars, such as mobilization and conflict diffusion. The third part investigates in the factors that contribute to effective peace building.

Research questions: What are the causes of civil wars? What happens during civil wars? How do civil wars end?
Prerequisites / NoticeParticipation in the preceding course, Conflict Research I: Political Violence, is recommended.
853-0010-01LConflict Research II: Civil Wars (Without Exercises)3 credits2VA. Juon, L.‑E. Cederman
AbstractIntroduction to research on civil wars. This course covers the causes, processes and solutions to civil conflicts and wars.
Objective- Knowledge on different causes of civil wars.
- Knowledge on processes during civil wars.
- Knowledge on different solutions and strategies to end civil wars.
- Application of theory to current examples of civil wars.
ContentThis course focuses on civil war, which is the most common type of political violence. The course is divided into three blocks: The first part analyses the causes of civil wars. The second part focuses on processes during ongoing civil wars, such as mobilization and conflict diffusion. The third part investigates in the factors that contribute to effective peace building.

Research questions: What are the causes of civil wars? What happens during civil wars? How do civil wars end?
Prerequisites / NoticeParticipation in the preceding course, Conflict Research I: Political Violence, is recommended.
857-0006-00LPolitical Order and Conflict Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 15.
MA Comparative and International Studies are given priority.
Registration required: lcederman@ethz.ch.
8 credits2SL.‑E. Cederman, Y. Pengl
AbstractThis seminar builds on the MACIS seminar on political violence and covers primarily the quantitative literature on civil and regional wars, especially with respect to the effect of economic and ethnic factors, political institutions and the geographic and international context. The students will develop an original research question to be dealt with in a research paper.
ObjectiveThis seminar covers ethnic violence, political-economy perspectives on war, the role of political institutions, and the international dimensions of civil conflict. The goal of the seminar is to expose the students to these topics by allowing them to discuss them in class and to write a term paper addressing an original research question.
868-0003-00LModule 3: Mediation Content Restricted registration - show details
Only for MAS Mediation in Peace Processes.
10 credits9GA. Wenger, L.‑E. Cederman
AbstractStudents learn about the content of peace processes in this module. This module combines various approaches to developing options with an examination of contemporary cases and how various content issues are managed and interlinked. The module focuses on security, power-sharing, justice, socioeconomic and environmental arrangements.
ObjectiveMediators learn about the content of peace negotiations and peace agreements in this module. The module builds on the understanding that the goal of mediation is not to eliminate the issues that are tearing a society apart, but rather to find mechanisms to deal with differences in a non-violent manner. Mediators need a sufficient understanding of various thematic topics related to peace processes (e.g., security, power-sharing, justice, economics) in order to create linkages between them and the specific content issues therein. An adequate level of knowledge of core themes will also help mediators understand how to work with expert advisors to support a mediation process. This module both introduces relevant theory on ways of dealing with content issues and looks at how such issues were managed and interlinked in specific contemporary cases. This module also begins to address the teamwork dimension of mediation, which will be further elaborated on in the following modules.